Special Issue "Recent Climate Change Impacts in Australia"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2023 | Viewed by 747

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Milton S. Speer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Interests: severe weather; climate variability and change; synoptic and mesoscale meteorology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Lance Leslie
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Interests: climate variability and change; severe weather; natural hazards; computational methods in geophysics; machine learning techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main threats of climate change in Australia, as elsewhere, resulting from the increase in temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans, include ecosystem collapse, more frequent severe weather, longer and more frequent droughts, and rising sea levels. The increasing temperatures at the poles are amplified by warmer oceans causing ice melt and rising sea levels, leading to lower oxygen in ocean habitats and killing coral reefs. The extreme coral bleaching event of 2016 resulted in a loss of approximately one-third of shallow-water coral cover in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. The combination of warming atmosphere and oceans is altering rainfall patterns, affecting the sustainability of a wide range of ecosystems. Dry rivers and streams in southeast Australia during a recent drought resulted in mass fish deaths in southeast Australia, and further fish deaths occurred in recent river surges from flooding rains that mixed with toxic water caused by algal blooms.

In summary, global warming is already leading to dramatic changes in the Australian climate, with impacts on ecosystems and most aspects of human health, economic activity and wellbeing.

This Special Issue welcomes all studies related to climate change impacts in Australia.

Dr. Milton S. Speer
Prof. Dr. Lance Leslie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change impacts
  • ecosystem collapse
  • climate change and variability
  • Australia

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Jet Stream Changes over Southeast Australia during the Early Cool Season in Response to Accelerated Global Warming
Climate 2022, 10(6), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10060084 - 15 Jun 2022
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Abstract
In recent decades, southeast Australia has experienced both extreme drought and record-breaking rainfall, with devastating societal impacts. Variations in the Australian polar-front jet (PFJ) and the subtropical jet (STJ) determine, for example, the location and frequency of the cool season (April–September) weather systems [...] Read more.
In recent decades, southeast Australia has experienced both extreme drought and record-breaking rainfall, with devastating societal impacts. Variations in the Australian polar-front jet (PFJ) and the subtropical jet (STJ) determine, for example, the location and frequency of the cool season (April–September) weather systems influencing rainfall events and, consequently, water availability for the southern half of Australia. Changes in jet stream wind speeds also are important for aviation fuel and safety requirements. A split jet occurs when the single jet separates into the STJ and PFJ in the early cool season (April–May). This study focusses on split jet characteristics over Australian/New Zealand longitudes in recent decades. During the accelerated global warming from the mid-1990s, higher mean wind speeds were found in the PJF across the Australian region during June–September, compared to the STJ. In contrast, significant wind speed increases occur in the early cool season (April–May) at STJ latitudes, which straddle the East Coast of Australia and the adjacent Tasman Sea. These changes are linked to major changes in the mean atmospheric circulation, and they include relative vorticity and humidity, both being vital for the development of rain-bearing weather systems that affect the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Climate Change Impacts in Australia)
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