Special Issue "Pediatric Surgical Oncology"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Harold N. Lovvorn, III
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
Interests: Wilms tumor; embryonal tumors; pediatric solid tumors; neonatal conditions; minimally invasive surgery; global health; all Pediatric Surgery

Special Issue Information

This Special Issue of the journal, Children, will highlight the biology of different embryonal tumors and how these factors stratify risk and treatment algorithms. Innovative surgical approaches for unique oncologic problems encountered will also be emphasized.

Dr. Harold N. Lovvorn III
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neuroblastoma
  • Wilms tumor
  • hepatoblastoma
  • osteosarcoma
  • Ewing sarcoma
  • rhabdomyosarcoma
  • nephron-sparing surgery
  • laparoscopy for pediatric solid tumors

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Article
Rhabdomyosarcoma and Extraosseous Ewing Sarcoma
Children 2018, 5(12), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5120165 - 10 Dec 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3349
Abstract
Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignant tumor that represents the most common form of pediatric soft tissue sarcoma. It arises from mesenchymal origin and forms part of the group of small round blue cell tumors of childhood. It has a constant annual incidence of [...] Read more.
Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a malignant tumor that represents the most common form of pediatric soft tissue sarcoma. It arises from mesenchymal origin and forms part of the group of small round blue cell tumors of childhood. It has a constant annual incidence of 4.5 cases per 1,000,000 children. The known histological diagnosis of the two major subtypes (embryonal and alveolar) has been recently enhanced by tumor biological markers and molecular differentiation diagnostic tools that have improved not only the updated classification based on risk stratification, but also the treatment approach based on the clinical group. Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a round cell tumor, highly malignant and poorly differentiated that is currently the second most common malignant bone tumor in children. In rare instances, it develops from an extraskeletal origin, classified as extraosseous Ewing sarcoma (EES). We provide an updated, evidence-based and comprehensive review of the molecular diagnosis, clinical and diagnostic approach and a multidisciplinary medical and surgical management according to the latest standard of care for the treatment of pediatric RMS and EES. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review

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Review
Current Management of Pleuropulmonary Blastoma: A Surgical Perspective
Children 2019, 6(8), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6080086 - 25 Jul 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3027
Abstract
Pleuropulmonary blastomas (PPB) are pediatric, embryonal cancers of the lung parenchyma and pleural surfaces and are among the most common DICER1—related disorders. These tumors undergo evolution through several forms, allowing division into types I, Ir, II, and III, with correlates to the age [...] Read more.
Pleuropulmonary blastomas (PPB) are pediatric, embryonal cancers of the lung parenchyma and pleural surfaces and are among the most common DICER1—related disorders. These tumors undergo evolution through several forms, allowing division into types I, Ir, II, and III, with correlates to the age of diagnosis and prognosis. We sought to provide a comprehensive review of the relevant literature describing the characteristics of these tumors and their multidisciplinary treatment, with an emphasis on surgical management. We describe the complementary roles of chemotherapy and surgery in the successful management of this disease. We discuss the timing of surgery and options for surgical approaches. We address the differentiation of PPB from congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the role of DICER1 testing for children with pulmonary cysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review
Neuroblastoma: Tumor Biology and Its Implications for Staging and Treatment
Children 2019, 6(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010012 - 17 Jan 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3726
Abstract
Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, has widely variable outcomes dependent on the specific biology of the tumor. In this review, current biologic principles that are used to stratify risk and guide treatment algorithms are discussed. The role for surgical [...] Read more.
Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, has widely variable outcomes dependent on the specific biology of the tumor. In this review, current biologic principles that are used to stratify risk and guide treatment algorithms are discussed. The role for surgical resection in neuroblastoma is also reviewed, including the indications and timing of surgery within the greater treatment plan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review
Pulmonary Metastasectomy in Pediatric Solid Tumors
Children 2019, 6(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010006 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2834
Abstract
Metastatic disease and the complications of treating metastatic disease are the primary causes of mortality in children with solid malignancies. Nearly 25% of children with solid tumors have metastatic disease at initial diagnosis and another 20% develop metastases during or after treatment. The [...] Read more.
Metastatic disease and the complications of treating metastatic disease are the primary causes of mortality in children with solid malignancies. Nearly 25% of children with solid tumors have metastatic disease at initial diagnosis and another 20% develop metastases during or after treatment. The most common location of these metastases is the lung. The role of surgery in metastatic disease depends greatly on the histology of the primary. In general, tumors that are refractory to adjuvant therapies are most appropriate for pulmonary metastasectomy. This article will summarize the indications for metastasectomy in pediatric solid tumors and discuss the ongoing debate over the technique of metastasectomy in osteosarcoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
Review
Hepatoblastoma—The Evolution of Biology, Surgery, and Transplantation
Children 2019, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010001 - 21 Dec 2018
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3959
Abstract
The most common primary malignant liver tumor of childhood, hepatoblastoma has increased in incidence over the last 30 years, but little is still known about its pathogenesis. Discoveries in molecular biology provide clues but have yet to define targeted therapies. Disease-free survival varies [...] Read more.
The most common primary malignant liver tumor of childhood, hepatoblastoma has increased in incidence over the last 30 years, but little is still known about its pathogenesis. Discoveries in molecular biology provide clues but have yet to define targeted therapies. Disease-free survival varies according to stage, but is greater than 90% in favorable risk populations, in part due to improvements in chemotherapeutic regimens, surgical resection, and earlier referral to liver transplant centers. This article aims to highlight the principles of disease that guide current treatment algorithms. Surgical treatment, especially orthotopic liver transplantation, will also be emphasized in the context of the current Children’s Oncology Group international study of pediatric liver cancer (AHEP-1531). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review
Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Surgical Oncology
Children 2018, 5(12), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5120158 - 26 Nov 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2351
Abstract
The application of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to resect pediatric solid tumors offers the potential for reduced postoperative morbidity with smaller wounds, less pain, fewer surgical site infections, decreased blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and less disruption to treatment regimens. However, significant controversy [...] Read more.
The application of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to resect pediatric solid tumors offers the potential for reduced postoperative morbidity with smaller wounds, less pain, fewer surgical site infections, decreased blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and less disruption to treatment regimens. However, significant controversy surrounds the question of whether a high-fidelity oncologic resection of childhood cancers can be achieved through MIS. This review outlines the diverse applications of MIS to treat pediatric malignancies, up to and including definitive resection. This work further summarizes the current evidence supporting the efficacy of MIS to accomplish a definitive, oncologic resection as well as appropriate patient selection criteria for the minimally invasive approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review
Biological Drivers of Wilms Tumor Prognosis and Treatment
Children 2018, 5(11), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5110145 - 26 Oct 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2237
Abstract
Prior to the 1950s, survival from Wilms tumor (WT) was less than 10%. Today, a child diagnosed with WT has a greater than 90% chance of survival. These gains in survival rates from WT are attributed largely to improvements in multimodal therapy: Enhanced [...] Read more.
Prior to the 1950s, survival from Wilms tumor (WT) was less than 10%. Today, a child diagnosed with WT has a greater than 90% chance of survival. These gains in survival rates from WT are attributed largely to improvements in multimodal therapy: Enhanced surgical techniques leading to decreased operative mortality, optimization of more effective chemotherapy regimens (specifically, dactinomycin and vincristine), and inclusion of radiation therapy in treatment protocols. More recent improvements in survival, however, can be attributed to a growing understanding of the molecular landscape of Wilms tumor. Particularly, identification of biologic markers portending poor prognosis has facilitated risk stratification to tailor therapy that achieves the best possible outcome with the least possible toxicity. The aim of this review is to (1) outline the specific biologic markers that have been associated with prognosis in WT and (2) provide an overview of the current use of biologic and other factors to stratify risk and assign treatment accordingly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
Review
Pediatric Solid Tumors in Resource-Constrained Settings: A Review of Available Evidence on Management, Outcomes, and Barriers to Care
Children 2018, 5(11), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5110143 - 23 Oct 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1850
Abstract
International disparities in outcomes from pediatric solid tumors remain striking. Herein, we review the current literature regarding management, outcomes, and barriers to care for pediatric solid tumors in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In sub-Saharan Africa, Wilms Tumor represents the most commonly encountered [...] Read more.
International disparities in outcomes from pediatric solid tumors remain striking. Herein, we review the current literature regarding management, outcomes, and barriers to care for pediatric solid tumors in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In sub-Saharan Africa, Wilms Tumor represents the most commonly encountered solid tumor of childhood and has been the primary target of recent efforts to improve outcomes in low-resource settings. Aggressive and treatment-resistant tumor biology may play a role in poor outcomes within certain populations, but socioeconomic barriers remain the principal drivers of preventable mortality. Management protocols that include measures to address socioeconomic barriers have demonstrated early success in reducing abandonment of therapy. Further work is required to improve infrastructure and general pediatric care to address disparities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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Review
Bilateral Wilms Tumor: A Surgical Perspective
Children 2018, 5(10), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5100134 - 24 Sep 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2650
Abstract
Historically, the management of bilateral Wilms tumor (BWT) was non-standardized and suffered from instances of prolonged chemotherapy and inconsistent surgical management which resulted in suboptimal renal and oncologic outcomes. Because of the risk of end-stage renal disease associated with the management of BWT, [...] Read more.
Historically, the management of bilateral Wilms tumor (BWT) was non-standardized and suffered from instances of prolonged chemotherapy and inconsistent surgical management which resulted in suboptimal renal and oncologic outcomes. Because of the risk of end-stage renal disease associated with the management of BWT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and nephron-sparing surgery have been adopted as the guiding management principles. This management strategy balances acceptable oncologic outcomes against the risk of end-stage renal disease. A recent multi-institutional Children’s Oncology Group study (AREN0534) has confirmed the benefits of standardized 3-drug neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the utilization of nephron-sparing surgery in BWT patients; however, less than 50% of patients underwent bilateral nephron-sparing surgery. The coordination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the timing and implementation of bilateral nephron-sparing surgery are features of BWT management that require collaboration between oncologists and surgeons. This review discusses the surgical management strategy in the context of BWT disease biology, with an emphasis on timepoints during therapy at which surgical decision making can greatly impact this disease and minimize long-term toxicities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Surgical Oncology)
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