Cardiometabolic Health in Children: Correlates, Determinants, Methodology, and Policy

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Cardiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 May 2024) | Viewed by 4412

Special Issue Editors

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27278, USA
Interests: vascular physiology; cardiometabolic risk; behavioural physiology; lifestyle; sedentary behaviour
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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand
Interests: dietary patterns; chronic disease; children; adolescents; cardiometabolic health
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Guest Editor
Department of Exercise Science, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244, USA
Interests: cardiometabolic diseases; skeletal health; behavioural assessment; young adults; children; adolescents

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) develop over a long period of time with pre-birth origins and childhood manifestation. During childhood, biological systems are the most malleable, and chronic disease risk trajectories are established. These trajectories are dependent on the interplay between genetic and environmental cues. Failure to expose children to environments that result in beneficial epigenetic changes can and will predispose them to the development of CMDs, including type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This Special Issue will explore the genetic and environmental (e.g., lifestyle, psycho-social, toxins, etc.) determinants of CMD in children, methodological considerations, and public health policy. The Guest Editors welcome various types of articles, such as original research, CMD risk stratification, methodology articles, and review articles.

Dr. Lee Stoner
Dr. Paula Skidmore
Dr. Simon Higgins
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lifestyle
  • cardiometabolic disease risk
  • environmental determinants
  • sedentary behaviour
  • nutrition
  • physical activity
  • sleep
  • risk stratification
  • growth and development
  • policy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 811 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Dietary Patterns and Indices of Arterial Stiffness and Central Arterial Wave Reflection in 9–11-Year-Old Children
by Pouya Saeedi, Jillian Haszard, Lee Stoner, Sheila Skeaff, Katherine E. Black, Brittany Davison, Harriet Harrex, Kim Meredith-Jones, Robin Quigg, Jyh Eiin Wong and Paula M.L. Skidmore
Children 2020, 7(6), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7060066 - 25 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3346
Abstract
Arterial stiffness is an important marker of vascular damage and a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Given that pathophysiological processes leading to an increased arterial stiffness begin during childhood, the aim of this clustered observational study was to determine the relationship between [...] Read more.
Arterial stiffness is an important marker of vascular damage and a strong predictor of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Given that pathophysiological processes leading to an increased arterial stiffness begin during childhood, the aim of this clustered observational study was to determine the relationship between modifiable factors including dietary patterns and indices of aortic arterial stiffness and wave reflection in 9–11-year-old children. Data collection was conducted between April and December 2015 in 17 primary schools in Dunedin, New Zealand. Dietary data were collected using a previously validated food frequency questionnaire and identified using principal component analysis method. Arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, PWV) and central arterial wave reflection (augmentation index, AIx) were measured using the SphygmoCor XCEL system (Atcor Medical, Sydney, Australia). Complete data for PWV and AIx analyses were available for 389 and 337 children, respectively. The mean age of children was 9.7 ± 0.7 years, 49.0% were girls and 76.0% were classified as “normal weight”. The two identified dietary patterns were “Snacks” and “Fruit and Vegetables”. Mean PWV and AIx were 5.8 ± 0.8 m/s and −2.1 ± 14.1%, respectively. There were no clinically meaningful relationships between the identified dietary pattern scores and either PWV or AIx in 9–11-year-old children. Full article
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