Special Issue "Parenting in Face of Health Challenges: Research and Interventions"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dora Isabel Fialho Pereira
Website
Guest Editor
Deptment of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, University of Madeira, Campus da Penteada, 9020-105 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: parenting assessment; child protection; systemic intervention; parenting capacity; parenting skills; mental health
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Special Issue Information

Health can be considered as a major asset or a special challenge for parenting, as situations such as mental disorders, chronic diseases, or long-term treatments require major changes and adaptations in a family life or, more specifically, in parenting functioning in order to assure children’s needs. Since parenting is an interpersonal process, the health conditions of both children and parents influence it. In addition, the health conditions of parents may also impact the quality of children’s development, being sometimes associated with a higher risk of child abuse and neglect. Gathering and mobilizing adequate internal and external resources (as parenting capacity, skills, or social support) to deal with the health conditions of parents, children, or both are a major concern for many researchers and professionals in health care, as well as in social services, education, or justice.

This Special Issue welcomes submissions from any discipline focused on universal, indicated, or specialized preventive approaches to parenting in the presence of some kind of health challenge, based on conceptual models and interventions with parents (including kinship care, foster parents, and adoptive parents), and their impact on children’s and parents wellbeing. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary approaches, examining  different health conditions in diverse settings (community, schools, health services) and regions of the world. Systematic reviews, pilot studies, case studies, description of innovative practices or impact evaluations of parenting interventions and programs are welcome.

Dr. Dora Isabel Fialho Pereira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health conditions
  • parenting skills
  • parenting capacity
  • prevention
  • intervention
  • children' well-being
  • impact studies
  • innovative practices

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Familial Factors Associating with Youth Physical Activity Using a National Sample
Children 2020, 7(7), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7070079 - 15 Jul 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of familial and child-related factors with reported child physical activity using a representative sample of US children and adolescents. Data were analyzed from the combined 2017–2018 National Survey of Children’s Health. Household addresses [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of familial and child-related factors with reported child physical activity using a representative sample of US children and adolescents. Data were analyzed from the combined 2017–2018 National Survey of Children’s Health. Household addresses were randomly selected within each US state. One parent within each household answered health and wellness questions pertaining to one randomly selected child (n = 37,392; 48.8% female; 6–17 years old). Weighted logistic regression models examined the independent and joint associations between family-level and child-level factors with a child meeting the 60 min of physical activity per day guideline. After controlling for confounders, higher levels of family resilience (odds ratio (OR) = 2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35–3.49, p = 0.001), high event attendance (OR = 1.65; 95%CI: 1.18–2.31, p = 0.004), and high family income (OR = 1.84, 95%CI: 1.34–2.52, p < 0.001) significantly associated with higher odds of a child meeting the 60 min of physical activity per day guideline. Family generational status and adult education significantly modified the association between family resilience and child physical activity. Programs that develop family resilience and encourage parental attendance for their child’s events or activities may positively influence a child’s physical activity behaviors. Expanded or enhanced programming may be needed for lower income families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in Face of Health Challenges: Research and Interventions)
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