Special Issue "Chemical Sensors for Heavy Metals/Toxin Detection"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Larisa Lvova

Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: electrochemical and opticl chemical sensors; multisensory analysis and chemometrics; environmental monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The huge release of toxins into the environment and multi-metal contamination have become significant problems nowadays in many countries and entire regions. The growing industrial impact, incorrect preservation of wastes, and, as a consequence, the massive proliferation of toxic microorganisms, are the main causes of widespread environmental pollution by toxins and heavy metals. The high content of these pollutants in soil, air and drinking water cause their consecutive accumulation in humans and this phenomenon has been connected to the insurgence of allergies, tumors, and other pathologies. The necessity of careful detection and frequent analysis of heavy metals and toxins, in order to protect humans and the environment against risks caused by them, are evident.

This Special Issue on “Chemical Sensors for Heavy Metals/Toxin Detection” will include the latest developments and advances in chemical sensors and related analytical methods for heavy metals and toxins assessment. New research and ideas for metallic pollutants and toxins detection, comprising novel sensing ligands and materials, functioning mechanisms, fabrication technologies, construction details, and practical applications for environmental monitoring, industrial control, clinical analysis are strongly invited to be a part of this Special Issue.

Dr. Larisa Lvova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical sensors
  • electrochemical methods
  • optical sensors
  • nanomaterials
  • heavy metals
  • bacterial toxins
  • environmental monitoring

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Handheld Enzymatic Luminescent Biosensor for Rapid Detection of Heavy Metals in Water Samples
Chemosensors 2019, 7(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors7010016
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
Enzymatic luminescent systems are a promising tool for rapid detection of heavy metals ions for water quality assessment. Nevertheless, their widespread use is limited by the lack of test procedure automation and available sensitive handheld luminometers. Herein we describe integration of disposable microfluidic [...] Read more.
Enzymatic luminescent systems are a promising tool for rapid detection of heavy metals ions for water quality assessment. Nevertheless, their widespread use is limited by the lack of test procedure automation and available sensitive handheld luminometers. Herein we describe integration of disposable microfluidic chips for bioluminescent enzyme-inhibition based assay with a handheld luminometer, which detection system is based on a thermally stabilized silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Microfluidic chips were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) by micro-milling method and sealed using a solvent bonding technique. The composition of the bioluminescent system in microfluidic chip was optimized to achieve higher luminescence intensity and storage time. Results indicate that developed device provided comparable sensitivity with bench-scale PMT-based commercial luminometers. Limit of detection for copper (II) sulfate reached 2.5 mg/L for developed biosensor. Hereby we proved the concept of handheld enzymatic optical biosensors with disposable chips for bioassay. The proposed biosensor can be used as an early warning field-deployable system for rapid detection of heavy metals salts and other toxic chemicals, which affect bioluminescent signal of enzymatic reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors for Heavy Metals/Toxin Detection)
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Open AccessCommunication Fluorescence and Naked-Eye Detection of Pb2+ in Drinking Water Using a Low-Cost Ionophore Based Sensing Scheme
Chemosensors 2018, 6(4), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6040051
Received: 7 October 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 6 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
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Abstract
Drinking water contamination of lead from various environmental sources, leaching consumer products, and intrinsic water-pipe infrastructure is still today a matter of great concern. Therefore, new highly sensitive and convenient Pb2+ measurement schemes are necessary, especially for in-situ measurements at a low [...] Read more.
Drinking water contamination of lead from various environmental sources, leaching consumer products, and intrinsic water-pipe infrastructure is still today a matter of great concern. Therefore, new highly sensitive and convenient Pb2+ measurement schemes are necessary, especially for in-situ measurements at a low cost. Within this work dye/ionophore/Pb2+ co-extraction and effective water phase de-colorization was utilized for highly sensitive lead measurements and sub-ppb naked-eye detection. A low-cost ionophore Benzo-18-Crown-6-ether was used, and a simple test-tube mix and separate procedure was developed. Instrumental detection limits were in the low ppt region (LOD = 3, LOQ = 10), and naked-eye detection was 500 ppt. Note, however, that this sensing scheme still has improvement potential as concentrations of fluorophore and ionophore were not optimized. Artificial tap-water samples, leached by a standardized method, demonstrated drinking water application. Implications for this method are convenient in-situ lead ion measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors for Heavy Metals/Toxin Detection)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Electrochemical Immuno- and Aptasensors for Mycotoxin Determination
Chemosensors 2019, 7(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors7010010
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 24 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
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Abstract
Modern analysis of food and feed is mostly focused on development of fast and reliable portable devices intended for field applications. In this review, electrochemical biosensors based on immunological reactions and aptamers are considered in the determination of mycotoxins as one of most [...] Read more.
Modern analysis of food and feed is mostly focused on development of fast and reliable portable devices intended for field applications. In this review, electrochemical biosensors based on immunological reactions and aptamers are considered in the determination of mycotoxins as one of most common contaminants able to negatively affect human health. The characteristics of biosensors are considered from the point of view of general principles of bioreceptor implementation and signal transduction providing sub-nanomolar detection limits of mycotoxins. Moreover, the modern trends of bioreceptor selection and modification are discussed as well as future trends of biosensor development for mycotoxin determination are considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Sensors for Heavy Metals/Toxin Detection)
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