Special Issue "Regulation of Erythropoiesis—Building a Red Blood Cell"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Andrew Perkins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Monash University, Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: transcriptional regulation of erythropoiesis; Kruppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) and networks; congenital anemias; JAK–STAT signalling in stress erythropoieis and myeloproliferative neoplasms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In healthy humans, erythropoiesis ensures the production of more than two million red blood cells (RBCs) every second. This can be increased 5–10-fold in response to increased requirements. There is a rich history of productive global collaborations between researchers and haematologists with diverse skill sets, which has led to our current comprehensive understanding of the ontogeny, cell biology, genetics, and genomics of erythropoiesis. Many pioneering discoveries in the field have led the way to a greater understanding of cell differentiation processes in general. RBCs are exquisitely built for one purpose, i.e., the transport of oxygen from the lungs to every cell in the body. This review series will track the journey of red blood cell (RBC) production in time and place, and from genetic blueprint to final construction. The series will integrate new knowledge about ontogeny, the niche, transcription, RNA processing and translation, cytokine signalling and stress responses, cell cycle control, and enucleation. We will attempt to integrate our understanding of the normal physiology and genetics of erythropoiesis with the aberrant differentiation that ensues from inherited or acquired mutations in the DNA blueprint. Lastly, we will review new ideas about how to make new RBCs from non-haematopoietic cells, such as iPS cells, or via direct reprogramming. Such knowledge could be harnessed in the future to replace endogenous factories within the bone marrow with exogenous ones so as to secure RBC supply.

It is with great pleasure that I invite you to contribute to this review series in Cells on “Regulation of Erythropoiesis: Building a Red Blood Cell”. The aim of the series is to provide a comprehensive and integrated series of reviews on key topics in erythropoiesis. The series will follow the construction of an RBC from the DNA blueprint to the final supply of an enucleated long-lived cell to the circulation. This process is very commonly derailed by inherited or acquired mutations that disrupt the journey of an RBC from inception to the final enucleated cell that provides three months of oxygen delivery service to the body. I encourage reviews that compare normal with aberrant genetic programs that direct production of normal or defective RBCs, respectively.

Prof. Andrew Perkins
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • erythroid cell ontogeny
  • stress erythropoiesis
  • EPOR and other signalling pathways
  • transcriptional networks
  • RNA splicing including intron retention
  • translation and Diamond-Blackfan anemia
  • heme and erythroid regulation
  • globin gene switching
  • nuclear compaction and enucleation
  • the erythroblastic island

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Do Blood Group Antigens and the Red Cell Membrane Influence Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection?
Cells 2020, 9(4), 845; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9040845 - 31 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1408
Abstract
The expression of blood group antigens varies across human populations and geographical regions due to natural selection and the influence of environment factors and disease. The red cell membrane is host to numerous surface antigens which are able to influence susceptibility to disease, [...] Read more.
The expression of blood group antigens varies across human populations and geographical regions due to natural selection and the influence of environment factors and disease. The red cell membrane is host to numerous surface antigens which are able to influence susceptibility to disease, by acting as receptors for pathogens, or by influencing the immune response. Investigations have shown that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) can bind and gain entry into erythrocytes, and therefore it is hypothesized that blood groups could play a role in this process. The ABO blood group has been well studied. However, its role in HIV susceptibility remains controversial, while other blood group antigens, and the secretor status of individuals, have been implicated. The Duffy antigen is a chemokine receptor that is important in the inflammatory response. Those who lack this antigen, and type as Duffy null, could therefore be susceptible to HIV infection, especially if associated with neutropenia. Other antigens including those in the Rh, Lutheran and OK blood group systems have all been shown to interact with HIV. More recently, experiments show that cells which overexpress the Pk antigen appear to be protected against infection. These reports all demonstrate that red cell antigens interact and influence HIV infection. However, as the red cell membrane is complex and the pathogenesis of HIV multi-factorial, the role of blood group antigens cannot be studied in isolation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Erythropoiesis—Building a Red Blood Cell)
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Stress Erythropoiesis is a Key Inflammatory Response
Cells 2020, 9(3), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030634 - 06 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1620
Abstract
Bone marrow medullary erythropoiesis is primarily homeostatic. It produces new erythrocytes at a constant rate, which is balanced by the turnover of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages in the spleen. Despite the enormous capacity of the bone marrow to produce erythrocytes, there are times [...] Read more.
Bone marrow medullary erythropoiesis is primarily homeostatic. It produces new erythrocytes at a constant rate, which is balanced by the turnover of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages in the spleen. Despite the enormous capacity of the bone marrow to produce erythrocytes, there are times when it is unable to keep pace with erythroid demand. At these times stress erythropoiesis predominates. Stress erythropoiesis generates a large bolus of new erythrocytes to maintain homeostasis until steady state erythropoiesis can resume. In this review, we outline the mechanistic differences between stress erythropoiesis and steady state erythropoiesis and show that their responses to inflammation are complementary. We propose a new hypothesis that stress erythropoiesis is induced by inflammation and plays a key role in maintaining erythroid homeostasis during inflammatory responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Erythropoiesis—Building a Red Blood Cell)
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Open AccessReview
Optical Tweezers in Studies of Red Blood Cells
Cells 2020, 9(3), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030545 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1975
Abstract
Optical tweezers (OTs) are innovative instruments utilized for the manipulation of microscopic biological objects of interest. Rapid improvements in precision and degree of freedom of multichannel and multifunctional OTs have ushered in a new era of studies in basic physical and chemical properties [...] Read more.
Optical tweezers (OTs) are innovative instruments utilized for the manipulation of microscopic biological objects of interest. Rapid improvements in precision and degree of freedom of multichannel and multifunctional OTs have ushered in a new era of studies in basic physical and chemical properties of living tissues and unknown biomechanics in biological processes. Nowadays, OTs are used extensively for studying living cells and have initiated far-reaching influence in various fundamental studies in life sciences. There is also a high potential for using OTs in haemorheology, investigations of blood microcirculation and the mutual interplay of blood cells. In fact, in spite of their great promise in the application of OTs-based approaches for the study of blood, cell formation and maturation in erythropoiesis have not been fully explored. In this review, the background of OTs, their state-of-the-art applications in exploring single-cell level characteristics and bio-rheological properties of mature red blood cells (RBCs) as well as the OTs-assisted studies on erythropoiesis are summarized and presented. The advance developments and future perspectives of the OTs’ application in haemorheology both for fundamental and practical in-depth studies of RBCs formation, functional diagnostics and therapeutic needs are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of Erythropoiesis—Building a Red Blood Cell)
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