Special Issue "Advances in Musculoskeletal Cell Therapy: Basic Science and Translational Approaches"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cellular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alessandra Colombini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Orthopaedic Biotechnology Lab, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161 Milan, Italy
Interests: mesenchymal stem cells; cartilage; intervertebral disc; genes
Dr. Enrico Ragni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Orthopaedic Biotechnology Lab, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161 Milan, Italy
Tel. +390266214067
Interests: mesenchymal stem cells; arthritis; exosomes; miRNA
Dr. Silvia Lopa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161 Milan, Italy
Interests: advanced in vitro models; inflammation; arthritis; mesenchymal stem cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The unstoppable progression of knowledge of the pathophysiological processes affecting bony, articular, and muscular structures allows for the continuous identification of new therapeutic targets and agents to be exploited in addressing the degenerative mechanisms affecting the musculoskeletal system.

The ultimate goal is to validate the results of in vitro studies in preclinical in vivo models, and subsequently translate the most promising therapies to clinical practice. The cutting-edge approaches are multiple, from the development of advanced in vitro models for the study of pathophysiological process to the implementation of cell-based therapies, including those that only involve cell paracrine activity or the combination of cells and scaffolds in tissue engineering approaches. In this context, progenitor cells, either stem or tissue specific, are fundamental as both actors and as in situ targets, due to their ability to promote a trophic and anti-inflammatory microenvironment.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect reports concerning advances in musculoskeletal cell therapy to drive researchers and clinicians towards innovative perspectives for the treatment of degenerative orthopaedic diseases.

Dr. Alessandra Colombini
Dr. Enrico Ragni
Dr. Silvia Lopa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • orthopaedics
  • stem cells
  • progenitors
  • regenerative medicine
  • clinical translation
  • bioengineering
  • in vitro models
  • cell-free approaches

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Treatment with Human Amniotic Suspension Allograft Improves Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Collagenase-Induced Tendinopathy
Cells 2019, 8(11), 1411; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8111411 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Treatment of tendon injuries is challenging, with neither conservative nor surgical approaches providing full recovery. Placental-derived tissues represent a promising tool for the treatment of tendon injuries. In this study, human amniotic suspension allograft (ASA) was investigated in a pre-clinical model of Achilles [...] Read more.
Treatment of tendon injuries is challenging, with neither conservative nor surgical approaches providing full recovery. Placental-derived tissues represent a promising tool for the treatment of tendon injuries. In this study, human amniotic suspension allograft (ASA) was investigated in a pre-clinical model of Achilles tendinopathy. Collagenase type I was injected in the right hind limb of Sprague Dawley rats to induce disease. Contralateral tendons were either left untreated or injected with saline as controls. Seven days following induction, tendons were injected with saline, ASA, or left untreated. Rats were sacrificed 14 and 28 days post-treatment. Histological and biomechanical analysis of tendons was completed. Fourteen days after ASA injection, improved fiber alignment and reduced cell density demonstrated improvement in degenerated tendons. Twenty-eight days post-treatment, tendons in all treatment groups showed fewer signs of degeneration, which is consistent with normal tendon healing. No statistically significant differences in histological or biomechanical analyses were observed between treatment groups at 28 days independent of the treatment they received. In this study, ASA treatment was safe, well-tolerated, and resulted in a widespread improvement of the tissue. The results of this study provide preliminary insights regarding the potential use of ASA for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Reliable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Assessment in Tendon-Derived Cells under Inflammatory and Pro-Fibrotic/Healing Stimuli
Cells 2019, 8(10), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8101188 - 01 Oct 2019
Abstract
Tendon cells (TCs) are important for homeostatic maintenance in the healthy tendon and to promote tissue healing after injury. Further, resident and rare populations of tendon stem/progenitor cells, located at various sites within the tendon, contribute to tendon recovery by differentiating into repairing [...] Read more.
Tendon cells (TCs) are important for homeostatic maintenance in the healthy tendon and to promote tissue healing after injury. Further, resident and rare populations of tendon stem/progenitor cells, located at various sites within the tendon, contribute to tendon recovery by differentiating into repairing TCs. Gene expression analysis, through quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), constitutes a useful tool to study cellular responses, including the transition from initial inflammation to healing processes. A critical step required for data normalization is the choice of reliable reference genes (RGs), a process highly underestimated in tendon biology. In this study, the suitability of five commonly used RGs (ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, and RPLP0) was evaluated using TCs samples cultured in both standard and progenitor-enriching conditions, as well as under either inflammatory (IFNγ + TNFα) or pro-fibrotic/healing (CTGF) stimulation. The stability of the candidate RGs was computationally determined using NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper, and DeltaCt applets. Overall, ACTB resulted as the most stable RG on the basis of the integration of each gene weight, whereas B2M and RPLP0 performed poorly. To further validate ACTB’s optimal performance, we evaluated the expression of ICAM1, coding for an immune-related cell surface glycoprotein, and COL1A1, encoding collagen type I that is the main component of the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM), both known to be modulated by inflammation. The expression of both genes was heavily affected by the RGs used. Consequently, when analyzing gene expression in tendon-derived cells subjected to various stimulatory protocols, the use of a suitable RG should be considered carefully. On the basis of our results, ACTB can be reliably used when analyzing different TC types exposed to pathological conditions. Full article
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