Special Issue "Neurogenesis and Regeneration in the Zebrafish Central Nervous System"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cells of the Nervous System".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sepand Rastegar
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Guest Editor
Institute of Biological and Chemical Systems-Biological Information Processing (IBCS-BIP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany
Interests: gene regulation; transcription; neurogenesis; zebrafish; regeneration; neural stem cell
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Ms. Luisa Lübke
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Assistant Guest Editor
Institute of Biological and Chemical Systems - Biological Information Processing Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe, Germany
Interests: Developmental Biology; Zebrafish regeneration; Neurogenesis; Development of the CNS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In our modern society, neurodegenerative diseases, along with cancer, pose one of the main health threats, as the number of older citizens is rising. These diseases are characterized by a progressive degeneration of neurons, which eventually leads to their death and to the disintegration of the nervous system structure.

Currently, neurodegenerative diseases are incurable, as the available treatments either only manage the symptoms or slow down disease progression.

Deciphering the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adult neurogenesis and regeneration is of great importance because it will eventually allow us to identify specific reactive neurogenesis mechanisms and re-instruct neurogenesis in patients suffering from neurodegenerative conditions.

Lately, zebrafish has become a popular model in biomedical research due to its experimental advantages, the existence of numerous genetic manipulation tools and various genetic resources, and the fact that the genetic basis of most diseases is shared between human and zebrafish.

The present Special Issue aims to summarize some of the latest advances in the field of adult neurogenesis and regeneration, using zebrafish as a model organism. We intend to highlight the key molecular mechanisms involved in neurogenesis, under normal physiological conditions and regenerative conditions, in the zebrafish nervous system, focusing on different regions of the brain, retina, and spinal cord.

Dr. Sepand Rastegar
Dr. Luisa Lübke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Zebrafish
  • Adult neurogenesis
  • Neural stem cells
  • Glial Cells
  • Regeneration
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Brain injury
  • Olfactory bulb
  • Telencephalon
  • Retina
  • Optic tectum
  • Cerebellum
  • Spinal cord

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Review
Inflammation Regulates the Multi-Step Process of Retinal Regeneration in Zebrafish
Cells 2021, 10(4), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10040783 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 620
Abstract
The ability to regenerate tissues varies between species and between tissues within a species. Mammals have a limited ability to regenerate tissues, whereas zebrafish possess the ability to regenerate almost all tissues and organs, including fin, heart, kidney, brain, and retina. In the [...] Read more.
The ability to regenerate tissues varies between species and between tissues within a species. Mammals have a limited ability to regenerate tissues, whereas zebrafish possess the ability to regenerate almost all tissues and organs, including fin, heart, kidney, brain, and retina. In the zebrafish brain, injury and cell death activate complex signaling networks that stimulate radial glia to reprogram into neural stem-like cells that repair the injury. In the retina, a popular model for investigating neuronal regeneration, Müller glia, radial glia unique to the retina, reprogram into stem-like cells and undergo a single asymmetric division to generate multi-potent retinal progenitors. Müller glia-derived progenitors then divide rapidly, numerically matching the magnitude of the cell death, and differentiate into the ablated neurons. Emerging evidence reveals that inflammation plays an essential role in this multi-step process of retinal regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the inflammatory events during retinal regeneration and highlights the mechanisms whereby inflammatory molecules regulate the quiescence and division of Müller glia, the proliferation of Müller glia-derived progenitors and the survival of regenerated neurons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurogenesis and Regeneration in the Zebrafish Central Nervous System)
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Review
Cellular Mechanisms Participating in Brain Repair of Adult Zebrafish and Mammals after Injury
Cells 2021, 10(2), 391; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10020391 - 14 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 868
Abstract
Adult neurogenesis is an evolutionary conserved process occurring in all vertebrates. However, striking differences are observed between the taxa, considering the number of neurogenic niches, the neural stem cell (NSC) identity, and brain plasticity under constitutive and injury-induced conditions. Zebrafish has become a [...] Read more.
Adult neurogenesis is an evolutionary conserved process occurring in all vertebrates. However, striking differences are observed between the taxa, considering the number of neurogenic niches, the neural stem cell (NSC) identity, and brain plasticity under constitutive and injury-induced conditions. Zebrafish has become a popular model for the investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in adult neurogenesis. Compared to mammals, the adult zebrafish displays a high number of neurogenic niches distributed throughout the brain. Furthermore, it exhibits a strong regenerative capacity without scar formation or any obvious disabilities. In this review, we will first discuss the similarities and differences regarding (i) the distribution of neurogenic niches in the brain of adult zebrafish and mammals (mainly mouse) and (ii) the nature of the neural stem cells within the main telencephalic niches. In the second part, we will describe the cascade of cellular events occurring after telencephalic injury in zebrafish and mouse. Our study clearly shows that most early events happening right after the brain injury are shared between zebrafish and mouse including cell death, microglia, and oligodendrocyte recruitment, as well as injury-induced neurogenesis. In mammals, one of the consequences following an injury is the formation of a glial scar that is persistent. This is not the case in zebrafish, which may be one of the main reasons that zebrafish display a higher regenerative capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurogenesis and Regeneration in the Zebrafish Central Nervous System)
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