Special Issue "Catalytic Combustion of Soot"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Piotr Legutko
Website
Guest Editor
Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland
Interests: environmental catalysis; material synthesis and characterization; transition metal oxides; alkali doping; processes: soot combustion, dry methane reforming; N2O decomposition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing worldwide energy demand has led to the increased combustion of fossil fuels, despite all efforts to substitute it with “green energy”. A large variety of pollutants are emitted to the atmosphere during the combustion of carbon-based fuels. Special attention is focused on soot, which is responsible for many lung (i.e., pneumonia, pneumoconiosis) and cardiovascular (i.e., arrhythmia, heart attack) diseases, as well as cancerogenic activity. The negative influence of soot on the environment (i.e., greenhouse effect by albedo) has also been confirmed.

Soot emission sources can be divided into two groups: stationary (factories, energy plants, domestic heating) and mobile (cars, planes, ships), the latter creating more problems. The most promising solution seems to be particulate filters (DPF for diesel and GPF for gasoline), combined with a catalyst. As both soot and the catalyst are in the solid state, the most important challenge for catalyst design is to ensure a high degree of contact between them, as soot/catalyst contact is a key factor in the case of activity. Three main mechanisms of catalytic soot combustion can be found in the literature—the activation of an oxygen molecule, usage of NO2 formed by the oxidation of NO, and the mobility of the catalytic phase. Many catalytic systems have been explored so far, but numerous investigations still have to be conducted in the case of basic research as well as applied studies to ultimately solve the problem of soot removal from exhaust gases.

    

Dr. Piotr Legutko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • catalytic soot combustion
  • catalytic soot oxidation
  • catalytic soot abatement
  • catalytic particulate filter
  • particular matter removal
  • soot oxidation mechanism
  • soot oxidation kinetics and modeling
  • soot combustion catalysts
  • catalytic materials synthesis and characterization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Different Birnessite Interlayer Alkali Cations on Catalytic Oxidation of Soot and Light Hydrocarbons
Catalysts 2020, 10(5), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10050507 - 05 May 2020
Abstract
A series of layered birnessite (AMn4O8) catalysts containing different alkali cations (A = H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, or Cs+) was synthesized. The materials were thoroughly characterized [...] Read more.
A series of layered birnessite (AMn4O8) catalysts containing different alkali cations (A = H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, or Cs+) was synthesized. The materials were thoroughly characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, specific surface area analysis, work function, thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. The catalytic activity in soot combustion in different reaction modes was investigated (tight contact, loose contact, loose contact with NO addition). The activity in the oxidation of light hydrocarbons was evaluated by tests with methane and propane. The obtained results revealed that alkali-promoted manganese oxides are highly catalytically active in oxidative reactions. In soot combustion, the reaction temperature window was shifted by 195 °C, 205 °C, and 90 °C in tight, loose + NO, and loose contact conditions against uncatalyzed oxidation, respectively. The catalysts were similarly active in hydrocarbon combustion, achieving a 40% methane conversion at 600 °C and a total propane conversion at ~450 °C. It was illustrated that the difference in activity between tight and loose contacts can be successfully bridged in the presence of NO due to its facile transformation into NO2 over birnessite. The particular activity of birnessite with H+ cations paves the road for the further development of the active phase, aiming at alternative catalytic systems for efficient soot, light hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds removal in the conditions present in combustion engine exhaust gases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Combustion of Soot)
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Open AccessArticle
Developmental Study of Soot-Oxidation Catalysts for Fireplaces: The Effect of Binder and Preparation Techniques on Catalyst Texture and Activity
Catalysts 2019, 9(11), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9110957 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
An awareness of increasing climate and health problems has driven the development of new functional and affordable soot-oxidation catalysts for stationary sources, such as fireplaces. In this study, Al(OH)3, water glass and acidic aluminium phosphate binder materials were mixed with soot-oxidation [...] Read more.
An awareness of increasing climate and health problems has driven the development of new functional and affordable soot-oxidation catalysts for stationary sources, such as fireplaces. In this study, Al(OH)3, water glass and acidic aluminium phosphate binder materials were mixed with soot-oxidation catalysts. The effect of the binder on the performance of the Ag/La-Al2O3 catalyst was examined, while the Pt/La-Al2O3 catalyst bound with Al(OH)3 was used as a reference. Soot was oxidised above 340 °C on the Ag/La-Al2O3 catalyst, but at 310 °C with same catalyst bound with Al(OH)3. The addition of water glass decreased the catalytic performance because large silver crystals and agglomeration resulted in a blockage of the support material’s pores. Pt/La-Al2O3 bound with Al(OH)3 was ineffective in a fireplace environment. We believe that AgOx is the active form of silver in the catalyst. Hence, Ag/La-Al2O3 was shown to be compatible with the Al(OH)3 binder as an effective catalyst for fireplace soot oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Combustion of Soot)
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