Special Issue "Emerging Nanostructured Catalytic Materials for Energy and Environmental Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Anantha-Iyengar Gopalan Website 1 Website 2 E-Mail
Daeyong Regional Infrastructure Technology Development Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea
Interests: electrochemistry, polymer science, nanostructured materials, energy devices
Guest Editor
Dr. Saianand Gopalan Website 1 Website 2 E-Mail
Research and Innovation Division, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Global Innovative Center for Advanced Nanomaterials, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan Campus NSW 2308, Australia
Interests: solar energy conversion, functional nanomaterials, materials science, energy materials, electrocatalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Kwang-Pill Lee E-Mail
Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, South Korea
Interests: nanomaterials, sensors, environmental applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 In recent years, there has been great demand for the development of catalytic materials at the nanoscale (defined in general as 1–100 nm size scale) with a view to more accurately and efficiently control the reaction pathways. The development of next-generation nanostructured catalytic materials (NCM) relies on synthesis approaches, which can be suitable to produce stable surface-active sites through controlling the size, shape, and chemical composition of nanostructured catalysts and the surface characterization techniques that can determine catalytic activities.

The advances in NCM in the last ten years support a new vision for the nanoscience-inspired design, synthesis, and formulation of new NCM with high activities for energetically challenging reactions, high selectivity to valuable products, extended life times, and recyclability leading to the production of industrially important catalytic materials. Success has been achieved to a great extent, but exploration of developing new NCM through the precise control of the composition and structure of the materials (metals, polymers, alloys, composites, hybrids, etc.) of choice is continuing. Tremendous efforts are being made to design innovative catalysts that can be utilized in a multitude of applications. The implications of further progress in the development of new NCM and applications in the areas of energy and the environment are profound. 

This Special Issue is aimed at covering the latest progress and advances on emerging NCM to overcome the current issues and challenges with regards to synthesis and properties in the fields of energy (conversion and storage) and environment-related applications. We believe that this Special Issue will provide an excellent platform for researchers to share their newest scientific advancements in the field of NCM focusing on energy and environmental applications. Authors with adequate expertise on these topics are cordially invited to submit their contributions to Catalysts.  

We invite contributions in the form of original research papers, detailed reviews, or mini-reviews in, but not limited to, the specialized fields outlined below.

Prof. Anantha-Iyengar Gopalan
Dr. Saianand Gopalan
Prof. Kwang-Pill Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanostructured catalysts for energy conversion and storage
  • Semiconductor nanostructured materials for energy and environmental applications
  • Environmental remediation
  • Supported nanocatalysts
  • Nanostructured electrocatalysts
  • Nanostructured photocatalysts
  • Nanostructured photoelectrocatalysts
  • Nanostructured bio/photobiocatalysts
  • Nanostructured catalysts for photosynthesis/artificial photosynthesis
  • Nanostructured membranes for water purifications
  • Photoelectrochemical water splitting
  • Oxygen reduction reaction
  • Oxygen/hydrogen evolution reaction
  • Bioinspired catalysts
  • Sustainable/clean energy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Peroxide Production over TiO2 Passivated by SnO2
Catalysts 2019, 9(7), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9070623 - 21 Jul 2019
Abstract
Photocatalysis provides an attractive strategy for synthesizing H2O2 at ambient condition. However, the photocatalytic synthesis of H2O2 is still limited due to the inefficiency of photocatalysts and decomposition of H2O2 during formation. Here, we [...] Read more.
Photocatalysis provides an attractive strategy for synthesizing H2O2 at ambient condition. However, the photocatalytic synthesis of H2O2 is still limited due to the inefficiency of photocatalysts and decomposition of H2O2 during formation. Here, we report SnO2-TiO2 heterojunction photocatalysts for synthesizing H2O2 directly in aqueous solution. The SnO2 passivation suppresses the complexation and decomposition of H2O2 on TiO2. In addition, loading of Au cocatalyst on SnO2-TiO2 heterojunction further improves the production of H2O2. The in situ electron spin resonance study revealed that the formation of H2O2 is a stepwise single electron oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for Au and SnO2 modified TiO2 photocatalysts. We demonstrate that it is feasible to enhance H2O2 formation and suppress H2O2 decomposition by surface passivation of the H2O2-decomposition-sensitive photocatalysts. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Preparation of Visible Light Photocatalytic Graphene Embedded Rutile Titanium(IV) Oxide Composite Nanowires and Enhanced NOx Removal
Catalysts 2019, 9(2), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9020170 - 11 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The quest for developing highly efficient TiO2-based photocatalysts is continuing and, in particular, evolving a new strategy is an important aspect in this regard. In general, much effort has been devoted to the anatase TiO2 modifications, despite there being only [...] Read more.
The quest for developing highly efficient TiO2-based photocatalysts is continuing and, in particular, evolving a new strategy is an important aspect in this regard. In general, much effort has been devoted to the anatase TiO2 modifications, despite there being only a few recent studies on rutile TiO2 (rTiO2). To the best of our knowledge, studies on the preparation and characterization of the photocatalysts based on the intentional inclusion of graphene (G) into rTiO2 nanostructures have not been reported yet. Herein, we develop a new type of TiO2-based photocatalyst comprising of G included pure rTiO2 nanowire (abbreviated as rTiO2(G) NW) with enhanced visible light absorption capability. To prepare rTiO2(G) NW, the G incorporated titanate electrospun fibers were obtained by electrospinning and subsequently heat treated at various temperatures (500 to 800 °C). Electrospinning conditions were optimized for producing good quality rTiO2(G) NW. The rTiO2(G) NW and their corresponding samples were characterized by appropriate techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to ascertain their material characteristics. XRD results show that the lattice strain occurs upon inclusion of G. We present here the first observation of an apparent bandgap lowering because of the G inclusion into TiO2 NW. While anatase TiO2 NW exhibited poor visible light photocatalysis towards NOx removal, the rTiO2(G) NW photocatalyst witnessed a significantly enhanced (~67%) photocatalytic performance as compared to anatase TiO2(G) NW. We concluded that the inclusion of G into rTiO2 nanostructures enhances the visible light photoactivity. A plausible mechanism for photocatalysis is suggested. Full article
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