Special Issue "Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 4281

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anil Banerjee
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Columbus State University, Columbus, GA 31909, USA
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; low temperature catalytic oxidation of methane and carbon monoxide; kinetics and mechanism; surface science; identification of surface species by XPS; storage of hydrogen as automobile fuel
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Prof. Dr. Hongxing Dai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Environment and Life, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; environmental catalysis; photocatalysis; methane combustion; VOC removal
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Prof. Dr. Junhu Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023, China
Interests: in situ/operando spectroscopic characterizations (mainly Mössbauer spectroscopy) applied in chemistry and environmental and energy catalysis; highly efficiency heterogeneous catalytic materials; high-temperature anti-sintering supported metal catalysts by designing the novel strong metal–support interactions (SMSI)
Prof. Dr. Patrick Da Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut d’Alembert, Sorbonne Université, CNRS UMR7190, 2 pl de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr L’Ecole, France
Interests: kinetics; catalysis; thermodynamics; fuels; catalytic process; catalytic pollution control processes; chemistry of combustion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to provide an account of recent advances in the catalytic oxidation of methane and carbon monoxide. The proposed Special Issue will cover the following aspects. Invited papers dealing with some of these aspects will be considered for this Special Issue. We welcome original research articles and reviews. Routine research is not suitable for this Special Issue.

  • Concepts/themes:
  1. Development of catalysts, catalytic reactions, and processes; chemical engineering reactor design, reaction kinetics and mechanism; lab-scale and bench-scale process development; optimum conditions, catalytic efficiency, stability and sustainability, resistance to steam deactivation, etc.
  2. Determination of the structure and morphology of the catalyst and support, interactions of the support with the catalyst, changes in crystallite sizes, shape and chemical state of the catalyst in the presence of the support, catalyst–support interfaces, structural variations in the catalyst, effects of catalyst–support interactions on particle size distribution, etc.
  3. Techniques: Improvements/innovations in catalytic process development and reactor design; analytical techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), spherical aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (Cs-S/TEM); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infra-red spectroscopy (ir), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS); chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction; theoretical/computational studies, etc.
  • Applications: Catalytic activity, reaction rate, turnover frequency, activation energy, reaction mechanism; development of more sustainable catalysts by e.g. green/renewable synthesis of support, replacement of rare metals with available alternatives, etc.

Prof. Dr. Anil Banerjee
Prof. Dr. Hongxing Dai
Prof. Dr. Junhu Wang
Prof. Dr. Patrick Da Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • catalytic oxidation of methane
  • catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide
  • process development
  • catalyst development
  • catalyst characterization
  • reaction mechanism
  • catalyst–support interactions
  • sustainable catalyst
  • reactor design
  • lab-scale and bench-scale process development

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Investigation on the Role of Pd, Pt, Rh in Methane Abatement for Heavy Duty Applications
Catalysts 2022, 12(4), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12040373 - 25 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 590
Abstract
Methane abatement remains a challenge in aftertreatment systems of natural gas engines, currently under discussion in combination with synthetic methane. In this study, Pt/Rh and Pd/Rh-based three-way catalysts are investigated under various transient conditions because transients between O2 excess (lean) and O [...] Read more.
Methane abatement remains a challenge in aftertreatment systems of natural gas engines, currently under discussion in combination with synthetic methane. In this study, Pt/Rh and Pd/Rh-based three-way catalysts are investigated under various transient conditions because transients between O2 excess (lean) and O2-poor (rich) conditions can significantly enhance methane abatement. At mid to high temperatures, transitions from rich to lean feed yield higher rates of methane direct oxidation under lean conditions with the Pt/Rh catalyst, compared to the Pd/Rh catalyst. Both catalysts are able to trigger methane steam reforming (SR) after transitions from lean to rich feed. The SR reaction leads to increased H2 and NH3 formation. However, SR deactivates much faster in the Pt/Rh catalyst. At low temperature, the Pt/Rh catalyst is more active for SR. Results from an additional Pd-only catalyst confirm that Rh is essential for NOx conversion and high N2 selectivity. The distinct characteristics of Pt, Pd and Rh demonstrate the benefits obtained from the combination of the three platinum group metals. The potential of the Pt/Pd/Rh catalyst is proved to be significant throughout the complete engine map. Under optimized lean/rich oscillatory conditions, the Pt/Pd/Rh catalyst yields more than 95% methane conversion under almost all conditions while maintaining efficient abatement of all other pollutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide)
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Article
Magnesium as a Methanation Suppressor for Iron- and Cobalt-Based Oxide Catalysts during the Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide
Catalysts 2022, 12(2), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12020118 - 19 Jan 2022
Viewed by 550
Abstract
The preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PrOx) to CO2 is an effective catalytic process for purifying the H2 utilized in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells for power generation. Our current work reports on the synthesis, characterization and CO-PrOx performance evaluation of unsubstituted and [...] Read more.
The preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PrOx) to CO2 is an effective catalytic process for purifying the H2 utilized in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells for power generation. Our current work reports on the synthesis, characterization and CO-PrOx performance evaluation of unsubstituted and magnesium-substituted iron- and cobalt-based oxide catalysts (i.e., Fe3O4, Co3O4, MgFe2O4 and MgCo2O4). More specifically, the ability of Mg to stabilize the MgFe2O4 and MgCo2O4 structures, as well as suppress CH4 formation during CO-PrOx was of great importance in this study. The cobalt-based oxide catalysts achieved higher CO2 yields than the iron-based oxide catalysts below 225 °C. The highest CO2 yield (100%) was achieved over Co3O4 between 150 and 175 °C, however, undesired CH4 formation was only observed over this catalyst due to the formation of bulk fcc and hcp Co0 between 200 and 250 °C. The presence of Mg in MgCo2O4 suppressed CH4 formation, with the catalyst only reducing to a CoO-type phase (possibly containing Mg). The iron-based oxide catalysts did not undergo bulk reduction and did not produce CH4 under reaction conditions. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated the beneficial effect of Mg in stabilizing the active iron- and cobalt-based oxide structures, and in suppressing CH4 formation during CO-PrOx. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide)
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Article
LaNiO3 Perovskite Synthesis through the EDTA–Citrate Complexing Method and Its Application to CO Oxidation
Catalysts 2022, 12(1), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12010057 - 05 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 611
Abstract
A series of LaNiO3 materials were synthesized by the EDTA–citrate complexing method, modifying different physicochemical conditions. The LaNiO3 samples were calcined between 600 and 800 °C and characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, CO-TPD, TG, DT, and N2 adsorption. The results [...] Read more.
A series of LaNiO3 materials were synthesized by the EDTA–citrate complexing method, modifying different physicochemical conditions. The LaNiO3 samples were calcined between 600 and 800 °C and characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, CO-TPD, TG, DT, and N2 adsorption. The results evidence that although all the samples presented the same crystal phase, LaNiO3 as expected, some microstructural and superficial features varied as a function of the calcination temperature. Then, LaNiO3 samples were tested as catalysts of the CO oxidation process, a reaction never thoroughly analyzed employing this material. The catalytic results showed that LaNiO3 samples calcined at temperatures of 600 and 700 °C reached complete CO conversions at ~240 °C, while the sample thermally treated at 800 °C only achieved a 100% of CO conversion at temperatures higher than 300 °C. DRIFTS and XRD were used for studying the reaction mechanism and the catalysts’ structural stability, respectively. Finally, the obtained results were compared with different Ni-containing materials used in the same catalytic process, establishing that LaNiO3 has adequate properties for the CO oxidation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide)
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Article
Preparation of Pd/SiO2 Catalysts by a Simple Dry Ball-Milling Method for Lean Methane Oxidation and Probe of the State of Active Pd Species
Catalysts 2021, 11(6), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11060725 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 893
Abstract
A series of Pd/SiO2 catalysts were prepared with different Pd precursors by a dry ball-milling method and used in the catalytic oxidation of lean methane at low temperature. The effect of Pd precursors on the catalytic performance was investigated and the state [...] Read more.
A series of Pd/SiO2 catalysts were prepared with different Pd precursors by a dry ball-milling method and used in the catalytic oxidation of lean methane at low temperature. The effect of Pd precursors on the catalytic performance was investigated and the state of the most active Pd species was probed. The results indicate that dry ball-milling is a simple but rather effective method to prepare the Pd/SiO2 catalysts for lean methane oxidation, and palladium acetylacetonate is an ideal precursor to obtain a highly active Pd/SiO2-Acac catalyst with well- and stably dispersed Pd species, owing to the tight contact between acetylacetonate and Si–OH on the SiO2 support. Besides the size and dispersion of Pd particles, the oxidation state of Pd species also plays a crucial role in determining the catalytic activity of Pd/SiO2 in lean methane oxidation at low temperature. A non-monotonic dependence of the catalytic activity on the Pd oxidation state is observed. The activity of various Pd species follows the order of PdOx >> Pd > PdO; the PdOx/SiO2-Acac catalysts (in particular for PdO0.82/SiO2-Acac when x = 0.82) exhibit much higher activity in lean methane oxidation at low temperature than Pd/SiO2-Acac and PdO/SiO2-Acac. The catalytic activity of PdOx/SiO2 may degrade during the methane oxidation due to the gradual transformation of PdOx to PdO in the oxygen-rich ambiance; however, such degradation is reversible and the activity of a degraded Pd/SiO2 catalyst can be recovered through a redox treatment to regain the PdOx species. This work helps to foster a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and performance of supported Pd catalysts by clarifying the state of active Pd species, which should be beneficial to the design of an active catalyst in lean methane oxidation at low temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide)
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Article
Catalytic Elimination of Carbon Monoxide, Ethyl Acetate, and Toluene over the Ni/OMS-2 Catalysts
Catalysts 2021, 11(5), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050581 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 752
Abstract
The Ni-loaded cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) catalysts (xNi/OMS-2: x = 1, 3, 5, and 10 wt%) were prepared by a pre-incorporation method. Physicochemical properties of the as-synthesized materials were characterized by means of various techniques, and their catalytic [...] Read more.
The Ni-loaded cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) catalysts (xNi/OMS-2: x = 1, 3, 5, and 10 wt%) were prepared by a pre-incorporation method. Physicochemical properties of the as-synthesized materials were characterized by means of various techniques, and their catalytic activities for CO, ethyl acetate, and toluene oxidation were evaluated.The loading of Ni played an important role in improving physicochemical propertiesof OMS-2. Among all of the samples, 5Ni/OMS-2 exhibited the best catalytic activity, with the T90 being 155 °C for CO oxidation at a space velocity (SV) of 60,000 mL/(g·h), 225 °C for ethyl acetate oxidation at an SV of 240,000 mL/(g·h), and 300 °C for toluene oxidation at an SV of 240,000 mL/(g·h), which was due to its high Mn3+ content and Oads concentration, good low-temperature reducibility and lattice oxygen mobility, and strong interaction between the Ni species and the OMS-2 support. In addition, catalytic mechanisms of the oxidation of three pollutants over 5Ni/OMS-2 were also studied. The oxidation of CO, ethyl acetate, and toluene over the catalysts took place first via the activated adsorption, then intermediates formation, and finally complete conversion of the formed intermediates to CO2 and H2O. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane and Carbon Monoxide)
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