Special Issue "Air Pollution Control: Catalytic Oxidation and Reduction of Gaseous Pollutants"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kun-Yi Andrew Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, Taiwan
Interests: environmental catalysis; MOFs; nanomaterials; biomass conversion
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air pollution has been posing serious and extensive threats to human health, ecology, and even the economy. While various air pollution control technologies have been developed, catalysis represents one of the most practical and efficient methods to mitigate the negative impacts of air pollutants. Specifically, catalytic oxidization and reduction processes have become key to eliminating the emissions of gaseous pollutants. As catalysts—especially heterogeneous catalysts—play crucial roles in these catalytic reactions of air pollution control, the design, development, and fabrication of efficient and advantageous catalysts are focuses in environmental chemical engineering to offer a sustainable solution to control air pollution. Thus, this Special Issue is seeking original works that describe recent advances and efforts in designing and fabricating novel catalysts for air pollution control and elucidating relationships between characteristics and catalytic activities of catalysts to offer insights into catalysis science and materials technology.

We invite articles that address new advances in air pollution control technologies. We welcome the submission of works on topics including but not limited to the following for this Special Issue: the development of catalysts for oxidation processes of air pollutants (e.g., VOC, soot, etc.), the development of catalysts for reduction processes of air pollutants (e.g., NOx), catalytic indoor air quality control technologies, emissions and control technologies for vehicles, and integrated pollution control for CO2 and other air pollutants.

Prof. Kun-Yi Andrew Lin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heterogeneous catalysts
  • oxidation
  • reduction
  • air pollutants
  • environmental catalysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Insight into the Promoting Role of Er Modification on SO2 Resistance for NH3-SCR at Low Temperature over FeMn/TiO2 Catalysts
Catalysts 2021, 11(5), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050618 - 11 May 2021
Viewed by 159
Abstract
Er-modified FeMn/TiO2 catalysts were prepared through the wet impregnation method, and their NH3-SCR activities were tested. The results showed that Er modification could obviously promote SO2 resistance of FeMn/TiO2 catalysts at a low temperature. The promoting effect and [...] Read more.
Er-modified FeMn/TiO2 catalysts were prepared through the wet impregnation method, and their NH3-SCR activities were tested. The results showed that Er modification could obviously promote SO2 resistance of FeMn/TiO2 catalysts at a low temperature. The promoting effect and mechanism were explored in detail using various techniques, such as BET, XRD, H2-TPR, XPS, TG, and in-situ DRIFTS. The characterization results indicated that Er modification on FeMn/TiO2 catalysts could increase the Mn4+ concentration and surface chemisorbed labile oxygen ratio, which was favorable for NO oxidation to NO2, further accelerating low-temperature SCR activity through the “fast SCR” reaction. As fast SCR reaction could accelerate the consumption of adsorbed NH3 species, it would benefit to restrain the competitive adsorption of SO2 and limit the reaction between adsorbed SO2 and NH3 species. XPS results indicated that ammonium sulfates and Mn sulfates formed were found on Er-modified FeMn/TiO2 catalyst surface seemed much less than those on FeMn/TiO2 catalyst surface, suggested that Er modification was helpful for reducing the generation or deposition of sulfate salts on the catalyst surface. According to in-situ DRIFTS the results of, the presence of SO2 in feeding gas imposed a stronger impact on the NO adsorption than NH3 adsorption on Lewis acid sites of Er-modified FeMn/TiO2 catalysts, gradually making NH3-SCR reaction to proceed in E–R mechanism rather than L–H mechanism. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Solid Deposit Inside L-Type Urea Injector and NOx Conversion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine
Catalysts 2021, 11(5), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11050595 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 254
Abstract
The heavy-duty diesel engine is used in the main transportation vehicles in Korea to deliver products from various companies; however, diesel engines produce enormous quantities of nitrogen oxide (NOx), which harms human health. The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system is a [...] Read more.
The heavy-duty diesel engine is used in the main transportation vehicles in Korea to deliver products from various companies; however, diesel engines produce enormous quantities of nitrogen oxide (NOx), which harms human health. The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system is a common solution to reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines; however, heavy-duty diesel engines produce more NOx than can be dealt with using an SCR and thus require investigations into effective NOx reduction solutions. This study investigated 12,000 cc heavy-duty diesel engines from Hyundai using the 1000 rpm engine operation to produce 1330 ppm of NOx emission. The ammonia generation process was assessed by the amount of ammonia produced; the amount of ammonia gas was identified by 19 gas sensors on the catalyst surface; the effectiveness of the mixing process between the ammonia and the NOx in the system was determined by the NOx conversion values from a gas analyzer. Comparison between the experiment and simulation results shows the ammonia and NOx values and elucidates the temperature results for vaporization and saturation quantity, ammonia distribution, and NOx conversion in the system. The NOx conversion investigations also provide the chemical reaction and numerical equation relevant to the ammonia and NOx distribution. Full article
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