Special Issue "The Emerging Hallmarks of Cancer Metabolism for Precision Oncology Applications"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Cancer Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anna Dubrovska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
OncoRay – National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden–Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany, and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Dresden site, Germany
Interests: biomarkers for the individualized radiotherapy; metabolic biomarkers for cancers; cancer stem cells; molecular mechanisms of cancer radioresistance; therapy-induced tumor reprogramming; tumor radiosensitization
Prof. Dr. Verena Jendrossek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), University Hospital Essen, Virchowstrasse 173, 45122 Essen, Germany
Interests: intrinsic and microenvironment-mediated radiation resistance; cell and tissue responses to ionizing radiation; stress-induced metabolic reprogramming; biomarkers for radiosensitivity; combinatorial treatments for tumor radiosensitization and normal tissue protection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Leoni Kunz-Schughart
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
OncoRay—National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden–Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany, and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Dresden site, Germany
Interests: tumor pathophysiology; tumor micromilieu and cellular environment; tumor cell metabolism; metabolic targeting and co-targeting; 3-D assays; photon and proton therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ultimate goal of precision oncology is a more tailored and individualized treatment for cancer patients. However, reliable predictive biomarkers of therapy response along with effective treatments with low toxicity are still rare for many types of tumors. Thus, new strategies for personalized medicine including biomarkers for patient stratification, as well as novel targets for combinatorial treatment regimes need to be developed for improving the prognosis of cancer patients suffering from common cancer types with high rates of local recurrence or metastasis. Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is one of the major hallmarks of cancer cells that plays an important role in tumor initiation and progression, as well as in therapy resistance and tumor immune escape. Thus, biochemical and molecular metabolic features of tumors might serve as specific biomarkers for identifying patients who will most likely benefit from a given therapy. Furthermore, targeting tumor metabolism emerged as a novel, highly potent avenue to enhance the efficacy of conventional anti-cancer treatments such as radio- and chemotherapy as well as immunotherapy approaches. This Special Issue is aimed at summarizing the emerging hallmarks of cancer metabolism across major tumor types and the prospects for clinical development of anti-metabolic therapy and reliable biomarkers to optimize treatment decisions.

Prof. Dr. Anna Dubrovska
Prof. Dr. Verena Jendrossek
Prof. Dr. Leoni Kunz-Schughart
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolic reprogramming
  • metabolic immune-adaptations
  • metabolic co-targeting
  • metabolic biomarkers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Identification of Pre-Diagnostic Metabolic Patterns for Glioma Using Subset Analysis of Matched Repeated Time Points
Cancers 2020, 12(11), 3349; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12113349 - 12 Nov 2020
Viewed by 565
Abstract
Here, we present a strategy for early molecular marker pattern detection—Subset analysis of Matched Repeated Time points (SMART)—used in a mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics study of repeated blood samples from future glioma patients and their matched controls. The outcome from SMART is a predictive time [...] Read more.
Here, we present a strategy for early molecular marker pattern detection—Subset analysis of Matched Repeated Time points (SMART)—used in a mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics study of repeated blood samples from future glioma patients and their matched controls. The outcome from SMART is a predictive time span when disease-related changes are detectable, defined by time to diagnosis and time between longitudinal sampling, and visualization of molecular marker patterns related to future disease. For glioma, we detect significant changes in metabolite levels as early as eight years before diagnosis, with longitudinal follow up within seven years. Elevated blood plasma levels of myo-inositol, cysteine, N-acetylglucosamine, creatinine, glycine, proline, erythronic-, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic-, uric-, and aceturic acid were particularly evident in glioma cases. We use data simulation to ensure non-random events and a separate data set for biomarker validation. The latent biomarker, consisting of 15 interlinked and significantly altered metabolites, shows a strong correlation to oxidative metabolism, glutathione biosynthesis and monosaccharide metabolism, linked to known early events in tumor development. This study highlights the benefits of progression pattern analysis and provide a tool for the discovery of early markers of disease. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Disruption of Glycogen Utilization Markedly Improves the Efficacy of Carboplatin against Preclinical Models of Clear Cell Ovarian Carcinoma
Cancers 2020, 12(4), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12040869 - 03 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1712
Abstract
High stage and recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCC) are associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. A distinguishing histological feature of OCC is abundant cytoplasmic stores of glucose, in the form of glycogen, that can be mobilized for cellular metabolism. Here, [...] Read more.
High stage and recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCC) are associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. A distinguishing histological feature of OCC is abundant cytoplasmic stores of glucose, in the form of glycogen, that can be mobilized for cellular metabolism. Here, we report the effect on preclinical models of OCC of disrupting glycogen utilization using the glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG). At concentrations significantly lower than previously reported for other cancers, 2DG markedly improves the efficacy in vitro of carboplatin chemotherapy against chemo-sensitive TOV21G and chemo-resistant OVTOKO OCC cell lines, and this is accompanied by the depletion of glycogen. Of note, 2DG doses—of more than 10-fold lower than previously reported for other cancers—significantly improve the efficacy of carboplatin against cell line and patient-derived xenograft models in mice that mimic the chemo-responsiveness of OCC. These findings are encouraging, in that 2DG doses, which are substantially lower than previously reported to cause adverse events in cancer patients, can safely and significantly improve the efficacy of carboplatin against OCC. Our results thus justify clinical trials to evaluate whether low dose 2DG improves the efficacy of carboplatin in OCC patients. Full article
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