Special Issue "Structural Assessment of Timber Structures"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jorge Manuel Branco
Website
Guest Editor
University of Minho
Interests: Timber Structures; Wood and wood-based materials
Dr. Hélder Sousa
Website
Guest Editor
University of Minho
Interests: Timber engineering, Wood products, Reliability assessment
Dr. Elisa Poletti
Website
Guest Editor
University of Minho
Interests: Seismic performance and retrofitting of timber structures and traditional carpentry joints, Numerical analysis of timber structures and constitutive modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Timber structures are an important part of the architectural and cultural heritage. In fact, any action concerning the conservation, repair, retrofitting and monitoring of the built heritage cannot avoid understanding how timber structures behave, from the material level to whole structures, including their joints, to assess their present condition and to promote different strategies for interventions.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present an overview of the main steps involved in the structural assessment of timber structures, from diagnosis and assessment to the retrofitting of timber elements, joints and structures. Original contributions regarding experimental research and numerical analysis from the academic field as well as from practice are encouraged. The Special Issue will be based on the original contributions presented to the next SHATiS’19 International Conference on Structural Health Assessment of Timber Structures that will take place on 25–27 September 2019 in Guimarães, Portugal.

Dr. Jorge Manuel Branco
Dr. Hélder Sousa
Dr. Elisa Poletti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Existing timber structures
  • Assessment
  • Codes and guidelines
  • Non-destructive testing
  • Repair and reinforcement
  • Monitoring
  • Case studies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Distribution of Concentrated Loads in Timber-Concrete Composite Floors: Simplified Approach
Buildings 2020, 10(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10020032 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
Timber-concrete composite (TCC) solutions are not a novelty. They were scientifically referred to at the beginning of the 20th century and they have proven their value in recent decades. Regarding a TCC floor at the design stage, there are some assumptions, at the [...] Read more.
Timber-concrete composite (TCC) solutions are not a novelty. They were scientifically referred to at the beginning of the 20th century and they have proven their value in recent decades. Regarding a TCC floor at the design stage, there are some assumptions, at the standard level, concerning the action of concentrated loads which may be far from reality, specifically those associating the entire load to the beam over which it is applied. This naturally oversizes the beam and affects how the load is distributed transversally, affecting the TCC solution economically and mechanically. Efforts have been made to clarify how concentrated loads are distributed, in the transverse direction, on TCC floors. Real-scale floor specimens were produced and tested subjected to concentrated (point and line) loads. Moreover, a Finite Element (FE)-based model was developed and validated and the results were collected. These results show that the “loaded beam” can receive less than 50% of the concentrated point load (when concerning the inner beams of a medium-span floor, 4.00 m). Aiming at reproducing these findings on the design of these floors, a simplified equation to predict the percentage of load received by each beam as a function of the floor span, the transversal position of the beam, and the thickness of the concrete layer was suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Assessment of Timber Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Improved Strength Grading In Situ on Modelling Timber Strength Properties
Buildings 2020, 10(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10020030 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
The management and preservation of structures in our built environment are central and challenging tasks for practicing engineers. Within the CEN member states (European Committee for Standardization), the so-called Eurocodes form the basis of the design and verification of the load-bearing capacity of [...] Read more.
The management and preservation of structures in our built environment are central and challenging tasks for practicing engineers. Within the CEN member states (European Committee for Standardization), the so-called Eurocodes form the basis of the design and verification of the load-bearing capacity of structures. Current Eurocodes do not contain special recommendations for existing structures, meaning that the principles for new structures are applied. This can lead to an incorrect estimation of the load-bearing capacity within the semi-probabilistic safety concept. A central task within the investigation and evaluation of existing structures is the strength grading of the material in situ using non-/semi-destructive technical devices. Studies show the potential of the ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement in combination with visual evaluation for an improved grading. The information on the material from an improved grading technique can be used to update the material parameters as a target variable using a measured reference variable. In this contribution, test data from a partner project (spruce, pine, and oak) are analyzed, applying the stochastic grading model of Pöhlmann and Rackwitz. It can be shown that different grading techniques influence the updated distribution function of the material strength within the grade. The results depend on the timber species. Perspectives to develop updated models dependent on the knowledge available are shown and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Assessment of Timber Structures)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of the Mechanical Performance in Compression Perpendicular to the Grain of Insect-Deteriorated Timber
Buildings 2020, 10(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10010014 - 19 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Among biological agents, insect attacks may cause severe degradation of timber structures in the service life of buildings which leads to lower mechanical performance and, thus, maintenance problems over time. Additionally, compression perpendicular to the grain always features a weak spot with respect [...] Read more.
Among biological agents, insect attacks may cause severe degradation of timber structures in the service life of buildings which leads to lower mechanical performance and, thus, maintenance problems over time. Additionally, compression perpendicular to the grain always features a weak spot with respect to the long-term mechanical performance of timber members and joints. In the present work, the respective strength and elastic modulus were thus investigated for insect deteriorated wood. Following a standardized geometry, small samples degraded by anobiids were extracted from beams made of sweet chestnut wood (Castanea sativa Mill.) that were removed from service. Visual assessment of the external wood surfaces was then performed to identify areas infested by insects. Afterwards, destructive monotonic compression tests were carried out perpendicularly to the grain on the damaged area to determine the loss of compressive strength and elastic modulus. The experimental results showed that the loss of compressive strength and elastic modulus might be linearly correlated to the wood density loss for small samples infested by insects. Nonetheless, future work should focus on determining accurately the density loss in the insect-deteriorated part through non- or semi-destructive tests, in order to establish stronger relationships with the mechanical properties loss investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Assessment of Timber Structures)
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