Special Issue "Selected Papers on Building and Architectural Acoustics from ICSV22"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Umberto Berardi

Associate Professor, Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-416-979-5000 (ext. 3263)
Interests: integration of energy saving technologies (green roofs, double skin facades) in buildings; architectural acoustics (sound propagation, energy decay, shape optimization) and building acoustics (noise insulation, new natural materials); building simulation; sustainability assessment at building, community and city level

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acoustics is an important aspect in buildings. People's perceptions of acoustic comfort and satisfaction are influenced by many parameters such as the room shape, building materials, and their location. However, most of the existing buildings are often suffering significant acoustic issues. Meanwhile, our knowledge of the principles of preferred acoustics in performance spaces is still limited, partly because we have not yet developed a complete understanding of the criteria which guide acoustical appreciation in a room. Architectural and Building acoustics is the subject of this special issue.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • architectural acoustics
  • room acoustics
  • sound insulation in buildings
  • acoustic properties of building materials

We provide a discount of 50% to the authors for this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Umberto Berardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Acoustics of a Music Venue/Bar—A Case Study
Received: 1 February 2016 / Revised: 5 March 2016 / Accepted: 11 March 2016 / Published: 16 March 2016
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Abstract
A vacant unit, once used by a Portuguese Deli, was converted to a bar/music room in Toronto. The unit was divided into two spaces along its north-south axis. The western portion was designed as a music room that would provide a performance space [...] Read more.
A vacant unit, once used by a Portuguese Deli, was converted to a bar/music room in Toronto. The unit was divided into two spaces along its north-south axis. The western portion was designed as a music room that would provide a performance space from a solo artist to a Jazz combo to a small rock band. The eastern part was designed as a regular bar/dining area. The plan also called for a microbrewery unit at the back of the unit. The bar music can be loud, while the music room can be pianissimo to forte depending on the type of performance. The acoustical design aspects are critical for the music room. In addition, the acoustical separation between the two spaces is equally important. The music room/bar is currently in use. The design results are compared to actual field measurements. The results showed that the music venue performed satisfactorily. The acoustical separation between the music venue and the bar/restaurant was better than expected other than an installation deficiency of the south side sound lock doors. The background sound along the northern portion was NC-35 or less. However, the southern portion’s background sound exceeded NC-35 due to the hissing of the return air grille. The acoustical design and the performance results of the music venue-bar/restaurant are presented in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers on Building and Architectural Acoustics from ICSV22)
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Open AccessArticle Acoustic Intervention in a Cultural Heritage: The Chapel of the Royal Palace in Caserta, Italy
Received: 9 November 2015 / Revised: 8 December 2015 / Accepted: 15 December 2015 / Published: 28 December 2015
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (6055 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The modern use of ancient heritage sites can be, to say the least, challenging from an acoustical perspective. In fact, modern needs may require acoustical interventions in contrast with the preservation issues of the cultural heritage. This paper deals with this topic in [...] Read more.
The modern use of ancient heritage sites can be, to say the least, challenging from an acoustical perspective. In fact, modern needs may require acoustical interventions in contrast with the preservation issues of the cultural heritage. This paper deals with this topic in an UNESCO designated world heritage site, the Palatine Chapel of the Royal Palace in Caserta, Italy. Since this chapel is currently being used for meetings and music chamber concerts, the acoustical characteristics of the chapel, originally used for religious purposes, are investigated. Field measurements were undertaken to evaluate the acoustical performance of the empty chapel. The measurements were then used to calibrate and validate a computer simulation model. Different acoustical treatments are then considered and simulations are used to determine the related acoustical improvements. Finally, the benefits of different acoustical treatments which are respectful of the aesthetic and historical value of this cultural heritage are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers on Building and Architectural Acoustics from ICSV22)
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Open AccessArticle Managing Measurement Uncertainty in Building Acoustics
Buildings 2015, 5(4), 1389-1413; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings5041389
Received: 30 October 2015 / Revised: 4 December 2015 / Accepted: 14 December 2015 / Published: 18 December 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (840 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In general, uncertainties should preferably be determined following the principles laid down in ISO/IEC Guide 98-3, the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM:1995). According to current knowledge, it seems impossible to formulate these models for the different quantities in building [...] Read more.
In general, uncertainties should preferably be determined following the principles laid down in ISO/IEC Guide 98-3, the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM:1995). According to current knowledge, it seems impossible to formulate these models for the different quantities in building acoustics. Therefore, the concepts of repeatability and reproducibility are necessary to determine the uncertainty of building acoustics measurements. This study shows the uncertainty of field measurements of a lightweight wall, a heavyweight floor, a façade with a single glazing window and a façade with double glazing window that were analyzed by a Round Robin Test (RRT), conducted in a full-scale experimental building at ITC-CNR (Construction Technologies Institute of the National Research Council of Italy). The single number quantities and their uncertainties were evaluated in both narrow and enlarged range and it was shown that including or excluding the low frequencies leads to very significant differences, except in the case of the sound insulation of façades with single glazing window. The results obtained in these RRTs were compared with other results from literature, which confirm the increase of the uncertainty of single number quantities due to the low frequencies extension. Having stated the measurement uncertainty for a single measurement, in building acoustics, it is also very important to deal with sampling for the purposes of classification of buildings or building units. Therefore, this study also shows an application of the sampling included in the Italian Standard on the acoustic classification of building units on a serial type building consisting of 47 building units. It was found that the greatest variability is observed in the façade and it depends on both the great variability of window’s typologies and on workmanship. Finally, it is suggested how to manage the uncertainty in building acoustics, both for one single measurement and a campaign of measurements to determine the acoustic classification of buildings or building units. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers on Building and Architectural Acoustics from ICSV22)
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Open AccessArticle The Use of Sound Absorbing Shading Systems for the Attenuation of Noise on Building Façades. An Experimental Investigation
Buildings 2015, 5(4), 1346-1360; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings5041346
Received: 29 October 2015 / Revised: 27 November 2015 / Accepted: 3 December 2015 / Published: 7 December 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (2068 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The problem of solar irradiation in building façades with large windows is often solved with the use of external shading devices, such as brise-soleil systems, but their potential acoustic effects on building façades are usually neglected. The purpose of this work is a [...] Read more.
The problem of solar irradiation in building façades with large windows is often solved with the use of external shading devices, such as brise-soleil systems, but their potential acoustic effects on building façades are usually neglected. The purpose of this work is a preliminary consideration of the acoustic behaviour of brise-soleil systems and, furthermore, the evaluation of the possibility to improve their performances, in terms of Sound Pressure Level (SPL) abatement over glass surfaces. The paper reports the results of a study on two portions of the same office building, with shading devices installed in front of large windows. Both airborne sound insulation measurements and SPL measurements over the glass surfaces of the windows were carried out to compare different situations, with or without louvers, and with sound absorbing experimental louvers as well. Results show that the louvers' presence can produce an increase in the SPL over the glass surface as a consequence of the reflection of the sound. Results further show that sound absorbing louvers improve the noise protection of the system, in terms of the SPL reduction, over glass surfaces, cancelling out the negative effect of the standard shading devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers on Building and Architectural Acoustics from ICSV22)
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