Special Issue "Functional Recovery after Stroke"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sheila Schindler-Ivens
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53211-1881, USA
Interests: stroke; rehabilitation; neuroplasticity; locomotion; neuroimaging; fMRI

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to contribute an article to a Special Issue of Brain Sciences that is dedicated to functional recovery after stroke.

This Special Issue will feature research articles that advance our understanding of neural, muscular, biomechanical, and behavioral factors that influence functional recovery of movement after stroke. I welcome basic, applied, and clinical research articles that utilize contemporary approaches to test novel hypotheses. Additionally of interest is translational work that seeks to bridge gaps among theory, laboratory observations, and clinical practice with the goal of enhancing functional recovery from stroke. In light of the heterogeneous nature of stroke and variations in recovery of movement after stroke, I am particularly interested in including articles that explore inter-individual differences and mechanistic explanations for these differences.

After compiling these articles into a Special Issue, it is my hope that we will be one step closer to understanding the mechanisms of functional recovery from stroke and to using this knowledge to enhance clinical care and quality of life for people with stroke. For these reasons, I welcome your expert contribution to this Special Issue.

Sheila Schindler-Ivens, PhD, PT
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Stroke
  • CVA
  • Brain infarct
  • Hemiparesis
  • Hemiplegia
  • Recovery
  • Movement
  • Motor control
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Rehabilitation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Fatigability of the Knee Extensors Post-Stroke
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7010008 - 12 Jan 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and [...] Read more.
Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and potential mechanisms in individuals with stroke. Methods: Eighteen participants (10 men, eight women) with chronic stroke (≥6 months) and 23 (12 men, 11 women) nonstroke controls participated in the study. Participants performed an intermittent isometric contraction task (6 s contraction, 3 s rest) at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque until failure to maintain the target torque. Electromyography was used to determine muscle activation and contractile properties were assessed with electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles. Results: Individuals with stroke had a briefer task duration (greater fatigability) than nonstroke individuals (24.1 ± 17 min vs. 34.9 ± 16 min). Men were more fatigable than women for both nonstroke controls and individuals with stroke (17.9 ± 9 min vs. 41.6 ± 15 min). Individuals with stroke had less fatigue-related changes in muscle contractile properties and women with stroke differed in their muscle activation strategy during the fatiguing contractions. Conclusions: Men and women fatigue differently post-stroke and this may be due to the way they neurally activate muscle groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Recovery after Stroke)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Plasticity in Reflex Excitability Induced by Five Weeks of Arm and Leg Cycling Training after Stroke
Brain Sci. 2016, 6(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci6040054 - 03 Nov 2016
Cited by 15
Abstract
Neural connections remain partially viable after stroke, and access to these residual connections provides a substrate for training-induced plasticity. The objective of this project was to test if reflex excitability could be modified with arm and leg (A & L) cycling training. Nineteen [...] Read more.
Neural connections remain partially viable after stroke, and access to these residual connections provides a substrate for training-induced plasticity. The objective of this project was to test if reflex excitability could be modified with arm and leg (A & L) cycling training. Nineteen individuals with chronic stroke (more than six months postlesion) performed 30 min of A & L cycling training three times a week for five weeks. Changes in reflex excitability were inferred from modulation of cutaneous and stretch reflexes. A multiple baseline (three pretests) within-subject control design was used. Plasticity in reflex excitability was determined as an increase in the conditioning effect of arm cycling on soleus stretch reflex amplitude on the more affected side, by the index of modulation, and by the modulation ratio between sides for cutaneous reflexes. In general, A & L cycling training induces plasticity and modifies reflex excitability after stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Recovery after Stroke)
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Open AccessCommunication
Corticospinal Excitability in Children with Congenital Hemiparesis
Brain Sci. 2016, 6(4), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci6040049 - 20 Oct 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used as an assessment or intervention to evaluate or influence brain activity in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) commonly caused by perinatal stroke. This communication report analyzed data from two clinical trials using TMS to assess [...] Read more.
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used as an assessment or intervention to evaluate or influence brain activity in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) commonly caused by perinatal stroke. This communication report analyzed data from two clinical trials using TMS to assess corticospinal excitability in children and young adults with hemiparetic CP. The results of this communication revealed a higher probability of finding a motor evoked potential (MEP) on the non-lesioned hemisphere compared to the lesioned hemisphere (p = 0.005). The resting motor threshold (RMT) was lower on the non-lesioned hemisphere than the lesioned hemisphere (p = 0.013). There was a significantly negative correlation between age and RMT (rs = −0.65, p = 0.003). This communication provides information regarding MEP responses, motor thresholds (MTs) and the association with age during TMS assessment in children with hemiparetic CP. Such findings contribute to the development of future pediatric studies in neuroplasticity and neuromodulation to influence motor function and recovery after perinatal stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Recovery after Stroke)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Prediction of Walking and Arm Recovery after Stroke: A Critical Review
Brain Sci. 2016, 6(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci6040053 - 02 Nov 2016
Cited by 9
Abstract
Clinicians often base their predictions of walking and arm recovery on multiple predictors. Multivariate prediction models may assist clinicians to make accurate predictions. Several reviews have been published on the prediction of motor recovery after stroke, but none have critically appraised development and [...] Read more.
Clinicians often base their predictions of walking and arm recovery on multiple predictors. Multivariate prediction models may assist clinicians to make accurate predictions. Several reviews have been published on the prediction of motor recovery after stroke, but none have critically appraised development and validation studies of models for predicting walking and arm recovery. In this review, we highlight some common methodological limitations of models that have been developed and validated. Notable models include the proportional recovery model and the PREP algorithm. We also identify five other models based on clinical predictors that might be ready for further validation. It has been suggested that neurophysiological and neuroimaging data may be used to predict arm recovery. Current evidence suggests, but does not show conclusively, that the addition of neurophysiological and neuroimaging data to models containing clinical predictors yields clinically important increases in predictive accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Recovery after Stroke)
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