Special Issue "Non-motor Disorders in Parkinson Disease: Basic Science and Advances in Treatment"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurodegenerative Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Patricia Martinez-Sanchez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health Sciences Faculty, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
Interests: Neuroimage; Dopamine; Thalamus; Stroke; Neurosonology; Parkinson´s disease
Dr. Francisco Nieto-Escamez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
Interests: Virtual reality; Videogames; Non-invasive brain stimulation; Neurorehabilitation; Motor system; Visual system; Alzheimer’s disease; Parkinson’s disease; Stroke

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to introduce a Special Issue of Brain Science dedicated to basic neuroscience and clinical research about the neurobiology of non-motor symptoms (NMS) of Parkinson’s disease and potential treatment strategies.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and although it is usually considered as a disorder that only affects movement, a broad spectrum of NMS can be observed in PD patients. Although the realities of the disease vary enormously from patient to patient, almost all of them have one or more NMS. In fact, a wide range of behavioural, neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms frequently play a primary role for the management of the disorder and constitute a major disease burden for patients and caregivers. Unfortunately, there is very little existing data about NMS, their neurobiology, and their treatment. It is therefore essential that researchers and practitioners comprehensively address the factors related to NMS if we want to achieve the best quality of life for PD patients.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of evidence from clinical and basic research perspectives about Parkinson´s NMS. A non-exhaustive list of potential papers may include research involving the use of neurophysiology techniques, genetics, pharmacological therapy, physical therapy, psychological intervention in clinical populations, as well as preclinical studies with animal models.

With regard to the format of papers, we will consider research articles, opinion/perspective articles, and review articles (narrative review, systematic review, meta-analysis).

Dr. Patricia Martinez-Sanchez
Dr. Francisco Nieto-Escamez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Non-motor symptoms
  • Dementia
  • Emotional disorder
  • Cognition disability
  • Perceptive deficits
  • Impulse-control
  • Depression
  • Apathy
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep problems
  • Neuroanatomy
  • Neurophysiology
  • Neuropharmacology
  • Neurogenetics
  • Neuroimage
  • Neuropsychology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Clinical models
  • Animal models
  • Interdisciplinary approach

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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Review
Gastroparesis in Parkinson Disease: Pathophysiology, and Clinical Management
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(7), 831; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11070831 - 23 Jun 2021
Viewed by 702
Abstract
Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) experience a range of non-motor symptoms, including gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms can be present in the prodromal phase of the disease. Recent advances in pathophysiology reveal that α-synuclein aggregates that form Lewy bodies and neurites, the hallmark of [...] Read more.
Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) experience a range of non-motor symptoms, including gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms can be present in the prodromal phase of the disease. Recent advances in pathophysiology reveal that α-synuclein aggregates that form Lewy bodies and neurites, the hallmark of PD, are present in the enteric nervous system and may precede motor symptoms. Gastroparesis is one of the gastrointestinal involvements of PD and is characterized by delayed gastric emptying of solid food in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Gastroparesis has been reported in nearly 45% of PD. The cardinal symptoms include early satiety, postprandial fullness, nausea, and vomiting. The diagnosis requires an appropriate test to confirm delayed gastric emptying, such as gastric scintigraphy, or breath test. Gastroparesis can lead to malnutrition and impairment of quality of life. Moreover, it might interfere with the absorption of antiparkinsonian drugs. The treatment includes dietary modifications, and pharmacologic agents both to accelerate gastric emptying and relieve symptoms. Alternative treatments have been recently developed in the management of gastroparesis, and their use in patients with PD will be reported in this review. Full article

Other

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Systematic Review
Neurosonological Findings Related to Non-Motor Features of Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060776 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 808
Abstract
Non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD), including neuropsychiatric or dysautonomic complaints, fatigue, or pain, are frequent and have a high impact on the patient’s quality of life. They are often poorly recognized and inadequately treated. In the recent years, the growing awareness [...] Read more.
Non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD), including neuropsychiatric or dysautonomic complaints, fatigue, or pain, are frequent and have a high impact on the patient’s quality of life. They are often poorly recognized and inadequately treated. In the recent years, the growing awareness of NMS has favored the development of techniques that complement the clinician’s diagnosis. This review provides an overview of the most important ultrasonographic findings related to the presence of various NMS. Literature research was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science from inception until January 2021, retrieving 23 prospective observational studies evaluating transcranial and cervical ultrasound in depression, dementia, dysautonomic symptoms, psychosis, and restless leg syndrome. Overall, the eligible articles showed good or fair quality according to the QUADAS-2 assessment. Brainstem raphe hypoechogenicity was related to the presence of depression in PD and also in depressed patients without PD, as well as to overactive bladder. Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity was frequent in patients with visual hallucinations, and larger intracranial ventricles correlated with dementia. Evaluation of the vagus nerve showed contradictory findings. The results of this systematic review demonstrated that transcranial ultrasound can be a useful complementary tool in the evaluation of NMS in PD. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Neurosonology in non-motor features of Parkinson's disease
Authors: -
Affiliation: -

Title: A prospective multicenter validation study of a machine learning algorithm classifier on quantitative electroencephalogram for differentiating between dementia with Lewy +bodies and Alzheimer's dementia
Authors: Yukiko Suzuki; Maki Suzuki; Kazue Shigenobu; Kazuhiro Shinosaki; Yasunori Aoki; Hirokazu Kikuchi; Toru Baba; Mamoru Hashimoto; Toshihiko Araki; Kristinn Johnsen; Manabu Ikeda; Etsuro Mori
Affiliation: Department of Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan
Abstract: An early and accurate diagnosis of Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is critical because treatments and prognosis of DLB are different from Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study was carried out in Japan to validate an Electroencephalography (EEG)-derived machine learning algorithm for discriminating DLB from AD which developed based on a database of EEG records from two different European countries. In a prospective multicenter study, patients with probable DLB or with probable AD were enrolled in a 1:1 ratio. A continuous EEG segment of 150 seconds was recorded, and the EEG data was processed using MC-004, the EEG-based machine learning algorithm, with all clinical information blinded except for age and gender. Eighteen patients with probable DLB and 21 patients with probable AD were the included for the analysis. The performance of MC-004 differentiating probable DLB from probable AD was 72.2% (95% CI 46.5-90.3%) for sensitivity, 85.7% (63.7-97.0%) for specificity, and 79.5% (63.5-90.7%) for accuracy. MC-004 was able to discriminate between DLB and AD with fairly high accuracy. MC-004 is a promising biomarker for DLB, and has the potential to improve the detection of DLB in a diagnostic process.

Title: Visuospatial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: a review
Authors: -
Affiliation: -

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