Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2020) | Viewed by 49454

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Interests: analytical chemistry; molecular and atomic spectroscopy; separation and preconcentration techniques; flow analysis; supramolecular analytical chemistry and organized assemblies; nanomaterials; chromatography; applied chemometrics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early and accurate diagnosis in medicine plays a major role in determining the nature of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Modern techniques and the advancement of -omics have triggered a paradigm shift in life sciences in which single-analyte tests are being replaced by multiplexing platforms that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several biological analytes. Equal emphasis is placed upon point-of-care (POC) and point-of-need (PON) technologies that are able to perform rapid diagnostic or prognostic assessments at the bedside, in secondary or tertiary care settings, or even at home, without expert intervention. These technologies can integrate unattended operation capabilities, away from centralized care facilities, in resource-limited settings, and even under infrastructure shortfalls (e.g., absent power supply). The advantages of this patient-centred approach are numerous: decreased therapeutic turnaround time, evidence-based therapeutic decisions, reduced cost, and real-time response.

Optical biosensors that measure absorbance, reflectance, scattering, and fluorescence in the ultraviolet, visible, or near-infrared spectral region have a profound role in the continually expanding field of personalized diagnostics. Emerging methods and techniques like plasmonics, spectroscopy, imaging, optical fibres, and assays based on consumer electronic devices (smartphones, scanners, etc.) also belong to this field.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a research forum in predictive diagnostics of optical (bio)sensors with an emphasis on POC/PON applications. Researchers working in a wide range of disciplines are invited to contribute research papers, short communications, or reviews that include, but not limited to, the following:

  • Optical probes, sensors, and biosensors
  • Low-cost diagnostics
  • Diagnostic spectroscopy and imaging
  • Multiplex bioassays/sensor arrays
  • Lab-on-chip assays
  • Micro total analysis systems (μTAS)
  • Wearable biosensors
  • Microfluidics
  • Sample preparation
  • Signal acquisition and analysis
  • Advances in instrumentation (including 3D printing).

Dr. Dimosthenis L. Giokas
Dr. Nikolaos Kourkoumelis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical biosensors
  • Biophotonics
  • Point-of-care
  • Point-of-need
  • Diagnostics

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

7 pages, 1563 KiB  
Communication
Design and Fabrication of Capillary-Driven Flow Device for Point-Of-Care Diagnostics
by Sammer-ul Hassan and Xunli Zhang
Biosensors 2020, 10(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10040039 - 15 Apr 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 5577
Abstract
Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics enables the diagnosis and monitoring of patients from the clinic or their home. Ideally, POC devices should be compact, portable and operatable without the requirement of expertise or complex fluid mechanical controls. This paper showcases a chip-and-dip device, which works [...] Read more.
Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics enables the diagnosis and monitoring of patients from the clinic or their home. Ideally, POC devices should be compact, portable and operatable without the requirement of expertise or complex fluid mechanical controls. This paper showcases a chip-and-dip device, which works on the principle of capillary-driven flow microfluidics and allows analytes’ detection by multiple microchannels in a single microchip via smartphone imaging. The chip-and-dip device, fabricated with inexpensive materials, works by simply dipping the reagents-coated microchip consisting of microchannels into a fluidic sample. The sample is loaded into the microchannels via capillary action and reacts with the reagents to produce a colourimetric signal. Unlike dipstick tests, this device allows the loading of bacterial/pathogenic samples for antimicrobial testing. A single device can be coated with multiple reagents, and more analytes can be detected in one sample. This platform could be used for a wide variety of assays. Here, we show the design, fabrication and working principle of the chip-and-dip flow device along with a specific application consisting in the determination of β-lactamase activity and cortisol. The simplicity, robustness and multiplexing capability of the chip-and-dip device will allow it to be used for POC diagnostics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 4186 KiB  
Article
A Novel Photoplethysmography Sensor for Vital Signs Monitoring from the Human Trachea
by James M. May, Justin P. Phillips, Tracey Fitchat, Shankar Ramaswamy, Saowarat Snidvongs and Panayiotis A. Kyriacou
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040119 - 2 Oct 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5872
Abstract
Current pulse oximeter sensors can be challenged in working accurately and continuously in situations of reduced periphery perfusion, especially among anaesthetised patients. A novel tracheal photoplethysmography (PPG) sensor has been developed in an effort to address the limitations of current pulse oximeters. The [...] Read more.
Current pulse oximeter sensors can be challenged in working accurately and continuously in situations of reduced periphery perfusion, especially among anaesthetised patients. A novel tracheal photoplethysmography (PPG) sensor has been developed in an effort to address the limitations of current pulse oximeters. The sensor has been designed to estimate oxygen saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate, and has been manufactured on a flexible printed circuit board (PCB) that can adhere to a standard endotracheal (ET) tube. A pilot clinical trial was carried out as a feasibility study on 10 anaesthetised patients. Good quality PPGs from the trachea were acquired at red and infrared wavelengths in all patients. The mean SpO2 reading for the ET tube was 97.1% (SD 1.0%) vs. the clinical monitor at 98.7% (SD 0.7%). The mean pulse rate for the ET sensor was 65.4 bpm (SD 10.0 bpm) vs. the clinical monitor at 64.7 bpm (SD 9.9 bpm). This study supports the hypothesis that the human trachea could be a suitable monitoring site of SpO2 and other physiological parameters, at times where the periphery circulation might be compromised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3760 KiB  
Article
Multimodal Device for Real-Time Monitoring of Skin Oxygen Saturation and Microcirculation Function
by Uldis Rubins, Zbignevs Marcinkevics, Janis Cimurs, Inga Saknite, Edgars Kviesis-Kipge and Andris Grabovskis
Biosensors 2019, 9(3), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9030097 - 2 Aug 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 6409
Abstract
The present study introduces a recently developed compact hybrid device for real-time monitoring of skin oxygen saturation and temperature distribution. The prototype involves a snapshot hyperspectral camera, multi-wavelength illuminator, thermal camera, and built-in computer with custom-developed software. To validate this device in-vivo we [...] Read more.
The present study introduces a recently developed compact hybrid device for real-time monitoring of skin oxygen saturation and temperature distribution. The prototype involves a snapshot hyperspectral camera, multi-wavelength illuminator, thermal camera, and built-in computer with custom-developed software. To validate this device in-vivo we performed upper arm vascular occlusion on eight healthy volunteers. Palm skin oxygen saturation maps were analyzed in real-time using k-means segmentation algorithm and two-layer optical diffuse model. The prototype system demonstrated a satisfying performance of skin hyperspectral measurements in the spectral range of 507–625 nm. The results confirmed the reliability of the proposed system for in-vivo assessment of skin hemoglobin saturation with oxygen and microcirculation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

26 pages, 900 KiB  
Review
Optical Biosensors for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
by Vivian Garzón, Daniel G. Pinacho, Rosa-Helena Bustos, Gustavo Garzón and Sandra Bustamante
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040132 - 11 Nov 2019
Cited by 63 | Viewed by 12788
Abstract
Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a fundamental tool when administering drugs that have a limited dosage or high toxicity, which could endanger the lives of patients. To carry out this monitoring, one can use different biological fluids, including blood, plasma, serum, and urine, [...] Read more.
Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a fundamental tool when administering drugs that have a limited dosage or high toxicity, which could endanger the lives of patients. To carry out this monitoring, one can use different biological fluids, including blood, plasma, serum, and urine, among others. The help of specialized methodologies for TDM will allow for the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic analysis of drugs and help adjust the dose before or during their administration. Techniques that are more versatile and label free for the rapid quantification of drugs employ biosensors, devices that consist of one element for biological recognition coupled to a signal transducer. Among biosensors are those of the optical biosensor type, which have been used for the quantification of different molecules of clinical interest, such as antibiotics, anticonvulsants, anti-cancer drugs, and heart failure. This review presents an overview of TDM at the global level considering various aspects and clinical applications. In addition, we review the contributions of optical biosensors to TDM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1741 KiB  
Review
Towards Lateral Flow Quantitative Assays: Detection Approaches
by Alexandr E. Urusov, Anatoly V. Zherdev and Boris B. Dzantiev
Biosensors 2019, 9(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9030089 - 17 Jul 2019
Cited by 130 | Viewed by 18156
Abstract
Point-of-care (POC) or bedside analysis is a global trend in modern diagnostics. Progress in POC testing has largely been provided by advanced manufacturing technology for lateral flow (immunochromatographic) test strips. They are widely used to rapidly and easily control a variety of biomarkers [...] Read more.
Point-of-care (POC) or bedside analysis is a global trend in modern diagnostics. Progress in POC testing has largely been provided by advanced manufacturing technology for lateral flow (immunochromatographic) test strips. They are widely used to rapidly and easily control a variety of biomarkers of infectious diseases and metabolic and functional disorders, as well as in consumer protection and environmental monitoring. However, traditional lateral flow tests rely on visual assessment and qualitative conclusion, which limit the objectivity and information output of the assays. Therefore, there is a need for approaches that retain the advantages of lateral flow assays and provide reliable quantitative information about the content of a target compound in a sample mixture. This review describes the main options for detecting, processing, and interpreting immunochromatographic analysis results. The possibilities of modern portable detectors that register colored, fluorescent, magnetic, and conductive labels are discussed. Prospects for further development in this direction are also examined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Diagnostics with Point-of-Care and Point-of-Need Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop