Special Issue "Aptamers to Replace Antibodies for in vitro Diagnostics"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yoann Roupioz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
SyMMES, UMR 5819 (Uni. Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS), 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France
Interests: Surface Functionalisation; Development of Cell Biochips, Bacteria Biochips; Cellular Monitoring on-the-chip; Surface treatments ensuring bio-compatibility; Aptamer-based Biochips
Dr. Arnaud Buhot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IRIG-DIESE-SyMMES, UMR 5819 (Uni. Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS), 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble, France
Interests: optoelectronic nose/tongue development; aptamer biosensors; surface plasmons resonance imaging; theory of microarrays (DNA or protein); biopolymer conformation; DNA based architectures; soft condensed matter
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among the different detection modes, the gold standard for biomarkers remains the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Its development more than fifty years ago and its sensitivity explain its widespread use in diagnostic applications. In particular, ELISA consists of a sandwich over the target between a target-capturing antibody and a detection antibody. Furthermore, ELISA is generally associated to a secondary antibody to generate an enzymatically amplified signal. However, antibodies as probes convey various drawbacks. In addition to batch-to-batch variations in their production, specific antibodies are tedious, costly, and challenging to generate. Furthermore, their shelf life can limit their incorporation, as embedded reagents in medical devices and their chemical modifications are particularly difficult in order to develop alternatives to the traditional enzymatic amplifications. These problems highlight the need for an alternative to antibodies in order to improve or to bypass ELISA.

Since their discovery in 1990, aptamers have appeared as an ideal alternative to antibodies in diagnostic applications. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides selected from a large library of random sequences for their specificity towards a target (SELEX method). Their 3D conformation confers to aptamers strong sensitivity and selectivity. In vitro selection allows the recognition of a large variety of targets ranging from ions, small molecules, proteins up to cells. The large-scale in vitro synthesis of aptamers ensures the low-cost production of the future reagents with a large set of possible chemical modifications of sequences. Finally, their chemical stability provides numerous opportunities for their integration in point-of-care medical devices such as paper strips or microfluidic cartridges.

Despite all those advantages, up to now, aptamers have failed to replace antibodies. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a state-of-the-art situation of the developments of aptamers as probes, the detection modes associated for in vitro diagnostics, and their integration in medical devices. Papers addressing the remaining challenges and hurdles still to overcome in order to access the IVD market are also welcome.

Dr. Yoann Roupioz
Dr. Arnaud Buhot
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aptamers
  • in vitro diagnostics (IVD)
  • medical devices
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Melting Curve Analysis of Aptachains: Adenosine Detection with Internal Calibration
Biosensors 2021, 11(4), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11040112 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 342
Abstract
Small molecules are ubiquitous in nature and their detection is relevant in various domains. However, due to their size, sensitive and selective probes are difficult to select and the detection methods are generally indirect. In this study, we introduced the use of melting [...] Read more.
Small molecules are ubiquitous in nature and their detection is relevant in various domains. However, due to their size, sensitive and selective probes are difficult to select and the detection methods are generally indirect. In this study, we introduced the use of melting curve analysis of aptachains based on split-aptamers for the detection of adenosine. Aptamers, short oligonucleotides, are known to be particularly efficient probes compared to antibodies thanks to their advantageous probe/target size ratio. Aptachains are formed from dimers with dangling ends followed by the split-aptamer binding triggered by the presence of the target. The high melting temperature of the dimers served as a calibration for the detection/quantification of the target based on the height and/or temperature shift of the aptachain melting peak. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamers to Replace Antibodies for in vitro Diagnostics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Aptasensors for Point-of-Care Detection of Small Molecules
Biosensors 2020, 10(9), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10090108 - 26 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
Aptamers, a group of nucleic acids which can specifically bind to a target molecule, have drawn extensive interest over the past few decades. For analytics, aptamers represent a viable alternative to gold-standard antibodies due to their oligonucleic nature combined with advantageous properties, including [...] Read more.
Aptamers, a group of nucleic acids which can specifically bind to a target molecule, have drawn extensive interest over the past few decades. For analytics, aptamers represent a viable alternative to gold-standard antibodies due to their oligonucleic nature combined with advantageous properties, including higher stability in harsh environments and longer shelf-life. Indeed, over the last decade, aptamers have been used in numerous bioanalytical assays and in various point-of-care testing (POCT) platforms. The latter allows for rapid on-site testing and can be performed outside a laboratory by unskilled labor. Aptamer technology for POCT is not limited just to medical diagnostics; it can be used for a range of applications, including environmental monitoring and quality control. In this review, we critically examine the use of aptamers in POCT with an emphasis on their advantages and limitations. We also examine the recent success of aptasensor technology and how these findings pave the way for the analysis of small molecules in POCT and other health-related applications. Finally, the current major limitations of aptamers are discussed, and possible approaches for overcoming these challenges are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamers to Replace Antibodies for in vitro Diagnostics)
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Other

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Open AccessLetter
Effective Isolation for Lung Carcinoma Cells Based on Immunomagnetic Separation in a Microfluidic Channel
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11010023 - 16 Jan 2021
Viewed by 565
Abstract
In this paper, we developed an isolation system for A549 human lung carcinoma cells as an effective factor for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. A microfluidic immunomagnetic method was used, in which the combination of immunomagnetic separation and a microfluidic system allowed [...] Read more.
In this paper, we developed an isolation system for A549 human lung carcinoma cells as an effective factor for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. A microfluidic immunomagnetic method was used, in which the combination of immunomagnetic separation and a microfluidic system allowed for increased isolation efficiency with uncomplicated manipulation. In the microfluidic immunomagnetic strategy, A549 cells were combined with aptamer-conjugated carboxylated magnetic beads and then collected in a specified region by applying a magnetic field. The results were recorded using a fluorescence microscope, and the captured targets were then quantified. The isolation efficiency of A549 cells is up to 77.8%. This paper developed a simple working procedure, which is less time consuming, high-throughput, and trustworthy for the isolation of A549 cells. This procedure can be a useful reference method for the development of an effective diagnosis and treatment method for lung cancer in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aptamers to Replace Antibodies for in vitro Diagnostics)
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