Special Issue "Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Dept. of EECS
Graduate Faculty member, Dept. of Biology
Lassonde School of Engineering,
York University, Toronto, Canada
Director of Biologically Inspired Sensors and Actuators (BioSA) Laboratory
4700 Keele Street, ON M3J 1P3, Toronto, Canada
Interests: complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensors for life science applications; biologically inspired sensors; point-of-care disease diagnostics; biosensors for cellular and molecular applications; high-throughput sensing systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 

This Special Issue of Biosensors will be devoted to micro and nano-bio-interfaces. Recent advances in micro and nanotechnologies have enabled the design and implementation of innovative bio-interfaces for a variety of biomedical applications, such as point-of-care diagnostics, high resolution disease diagnostics instruments, and automated biological laboratories and/or for life science research purposes. Among these technologies, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) offers several advantages over other competing technologies for high throughput integrated biosensors (e.g., Ion Torrent CMOS Chip) and wireless implanted bio-sensors. Furthermore, nanomaterials (e.g., nanowires, carbon nanotubes nanoparticles) have greatly attracted the attentions for drug delivery as well as disease detections (e.g. epilepsy and cancer) and biosensors. This Special Issue takes a close look at “Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces” as a multidisciplinary approach toward the development of novel tools for a veriety of life since applications. Therefore, the scope of this Special Issue ranges from the design and implementation of ‘micro- and nano- bio-interfaces’ devices to ‘micro- and nano- bio-interface’ applications in biomedical research, disease diagnostics, and subsequent clinical purposes.

 

Dr. Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • implantable biosensors
  • neural interfaces
  • automated biological laboratory
  • CMOS capacitive sensors
  • CMOS magnetic sensors
  • CMOS imepdometric sensors
  • CMOS voltammetric sensors
  • CMOS amperometric sensors
  • CMOS charge based sensors
  • point of care (POC) devices
  • disease detection
  • monitoring of cellular activities
  • bio-electrochemical interfaces
  • carbon nanotube/nanowires interfaces
  • nanoparticles
  • drug delivery
  • microfluidics
  • nanopore sensors

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Ultrasensitive Label-Free Sensing of IL-6 Based on PASE Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Micro-Arrays with RNA-Aptamers as Molecular Recognition Elements
Biosensors 2017, 7(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios7020017 - 17 Apr 2017
Cited by 15
Abstract
This study demonstrates the rapid and label-free detection of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) using carbon nanotube micro-arrays with aptamer as the molecular recognition element. Single wall carbon nanotubes micro-arrays biosensors were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Nanotube biosensors were functionalized with 1-Pyrenebutanoic [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates the rapid and label-free detection of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) using carbon nanotube micro-arrays with aptamer as the molecular recognition element. Single wall carbon nanotubes micro-arrays biosensors were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Nanotube biosensors were functionalized with 1-Pyrenebutanoic Acid Succinimidyl Ester (PASE) conjugated IL-6 aptamers. Real time response of the sensor conductance was monitored with increasing concentration of IL-6 (1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL), exposure to the sensing surface in buffer solution, and clinically relevant spiked blood samples. Non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA), PBS samples, and anti-IgG functionalized devices gave similar signatures in the real time conductance versus time experiments with no significant change in sensor signal. Exposure of the aptamer functionalized nanotube surface to IL-6 decreased the conductance with increasing concentration of IL-6. Experiments based on field effect transistor arrays suggested shift in drain current versus gate voltage for 1 pg and 1 ng of IL-6 exposure. Non-specific BSA did not produce any appreciable shift in the Ids versus Vg suggesting specific interactions of IL-6 on PASE conjugated aptamer surface gave rise to the change in electrical signal. Both Z axis and phase image in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) suggested unambiguous molecular interaction of the IL-6 on the nanotube-aptamer surface at 1 pg/mL concentration. The concentration of 1 pg falls below the diagnostic gray zone for cancer (2.3 pg-4 ng/mL), which is an indicator of early stage cancer. Thus, nanotube micro-arrays could potentially be developed for creating multiplexed assays involving cancer biomarker proteins and possibly circulating tumor cells all in a single assay using PASE functionalization protocol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020025 - 14 Jun 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs) through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP) and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD) techniques. The MD model is used to enhance [...] Read more.
This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs) through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP) and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD) techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
AC and Phase Sensing of Nanowires for Biosensing
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020015 - 19 Apr 2016
Cited by 7
Abstract
Silicon nanowires are label-free sensors that allow real-time measurements. They are economical and pave the road for point-of-care applications but require complex readout and skilled personnel. We propose a new model and technique for sensing nanowire sensors using alternating currents (AC) to capture [...] Read more.
Silicon nanowires are label-free sensors that allow real-time measurements. They are economical and pave the road for point-of-care applications but require complex readout and skilled personnel. We propose a new model and technique for sensing nanowire sensors using alternating currents (AC) to capture both magnitude and phase information from the sensor. This approach combines the advantages of complex impedance spectroscopy with the noise reduction performances of lock-in techniques. Experimental results show how modifications of the sensors with different surface chemistries lead to the same direct-current (DC) response but can be discerned using the AC approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors
Biosensors 2016, 6(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6010008 - 14 Mar 2016
Cited by 7
Abstract
Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, [...] Read more.
Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030042 - 06 Aug 2016
Cited by 9
Abstract
DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity [...] Read more.
DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Nano-Bio-Interfaces)
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