Inertial Sensor Assessment of Human Movement

A special issue of Biomechanics (ISSN 2673-7078). This special issue belongs to the section "Gait and Posture Biomechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2167

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Sports Biomechanics Lab, Department of Sports Medicine and Biology of Exercise, School of Physical Education and Sports Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 157 72 Athens, Greece
Interests: biomechanics; rhythmic movement; postural stability; muscle mechanics

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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical & Electronics Engineering, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, UK
Interests: clinical biomechanics; locomotion; lower-limb prosthetics; movement control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of low-cost, commercial MEMS inertial sensors has led to rapid growth in research on the application of these sensors for the assessment of daily human movement, sport and exercise.

The incorporation of inertial sensors in smartphones and, more recently, in smartwatches has not only driven research, but it has also broadened their application to detecting a wide range of human movements; for example, they are used in occupational, clinical and rehabilitation settings; movement variability; postural and motor control; and movement entrainment to rhythmic acoustic stimuli.

This Special Issue welcomes original research and review papers covering inertial sensing of the full span of human movement.

Dr. Elissavet Rousanoglou
Dr. John Buckley
Dr. Alan Godfrey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • inertial sensors
  • gyroscopes
  • accelerometers
  • physical activity
  • clinical applications
  • occupational applications
  • rehabilitation
  • sport applications
  • smartphone sensors
  • postural control
  • balance—postural stability
  • rhythmic movement

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 3491 KiB  
Article
Inertial Sensing of the Abdominal Wall Kinematics during Diaphragmatic Breathing in Head Standing
by Elissavet Rousanoglou, Apostolina Foskolou, Analina Emmanouil and Konstantinos Boudolos
Biomechanics 2024, 4(1), 63-83; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics4010005 - 02 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 407
Abstract
Head standing (HS) in concurrence with diaphragmatic breathing is an atypical deviation from daily activity, yet commonly practiced. The study aimed at the inertially sensed effect of diaphragmatic versus normal breathing on the abdomen wall kinematics during HS. Twenty-eight men and women maintained [...] Read more.
Head standing (HS) in concurrence with diaphragmatic breathing is an atypical deviation from daily activity, yet commonly practiced. The study aimed at the inertially sensed effect of diaphragmatic versus normal breathing on the abdomen wall kinematics during HS. Twenty-eight men and women maintained HS and erect standing (ES) under normal and diaphragmatic breathing. An inertial sensor (LORD MicroStrain®, 3DM-GX3®-45, 2 cm above the umbilicus, 100 Hz, MicroStrain, Williston, VT, USA) recorded the 3D abdomen wall angular displacement (AD) (bandpass filter (0.1–0.5 Hz)). ANOVAs (p ≤ 0.05, SPSS 28.0) were applied to the extracted variables (AD path: magnitude, individual variability-%CVind, and diaphragmatic to normal ratio). Reliability measures (ICC and %SEM) and the minimal detectable change (%MDC90) were estimated. Diaphragmatic breathing increased the AD path (p ≤ 0.05) with the diaphragmatic to normal ratio being lower in HS (p ≤ 0.05). The similar AD time series (cross-correlations at p ≤ 0.05) and the ICCs (>0.80) indicated excellent reliability with the similar across conditions %CVind (p ≤ 0.05), further enhancing reliability. The %MDC90 was consistently higher than the %SEM upper boundary, indicating the differences as “real” ones. The results contribute to the limited data concerning a widely practiced atypical deviation from daily activity, as HS in concurrence with diaphragmatic breathing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inertial Sensor Assessment of Human Movement)
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13 pages, 2204 KiB  
Article
An Automated Approach to Instrumenting the Up-on-the-Toes Test(s)
by Sarah Aruje Zahid, Yunus Celik, Alan Godfrey and John G. Buckley
Biomechanics 2023, 3(3), 278-290; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics3030024 - 26 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1068
Abstract
Normal ankle function provides a key contribution to everyday activities, particularly step/stair ascent and descent, where many falls occur. The rising to up-on-the-toes (UTT) 30 second test (UTT-30) is used in the clinical assessment of ankle muscle strength/function and endurance and is typically [...] Read more.
Normal ankle function provides a key contribution to everyday activities, particularly step/stair ascent and descent, where many falls occur. The rising to up-on-the-toes (UTT) 30 second test (UTT-30) is used in the clinical assessment of ankle muscle strength/function and endurance and is typically assessed by an observer counting the UTT movement completed. The aims of this study are: (i) to determine whether inertial measurement units (IMUs) provide valid assessment of the UTT-30 by comparing IMU-derived metrics with those from a force-platform (FP), and (ii) to describe how IMUs can be used to provide valid assessment of the movement dynamics/stability when performing a single UTT movement that is held for 5 s (UTT-stand). Twenty adults (26.2 ± 7.7 years) performed a UTT-30 and a UTT-stand on a force-platform with IMUs attached to each foot and the lumbar spine. We evaluate the agreement/association between IMU measures and measures determined from the FP. For UTT-30, IMU analysis of peaks in plantarflexion velocity and in FP’s centre of pressure (CoP) velocity was used to identify each repeated UTT movement and provided an objective means to discount any UTT movements that were not completed ‘fully’. UTT movements that were deemed to have not been completed ‘fully’ were those that yielded peak plantarflexion and CoP velocity values during the period of rising to up-on-the-toes that were below 1 SD of each participant’s mean peak rising velocity across their repeated UTT. The number of UTT movements detected by the IMU approach (23.5) agreed with the number determined by the FP (23.6), and each approach determined the same number of ‘fully’ completed movements (IMU, 19.9; FP, 19.7). For UTT-stand, IMU-derived movement dynamics/postural stability were moderately-to-strongly correlated with measures derived from the FP. Our findings highlight that the use of IMUs can provide valid assessment of UTT test(s). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inertial Sensor Assessment of Human Movement)
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