Special Issue "Bioengineering Nano and Micro-Gels for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 October 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Battista Edmondo

Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Biomaterials (Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale sui Biomateriali (CRIB)) Piazzale Tecchio, 80 – 80125 Naples, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; microgels and hydrogels; diagnostic assays; bead-based suspension arrays
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ibtisam E. Tothill

Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Institute, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL, UK
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Fax: +44 1234 75 8380
Interests: biomedical engineering; biosensors and diagnostics; drug discovery and development; food safety; nanomaterials; nanotechnology; smart materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paolo Antonio Netti

Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Biomaterials (CRIB) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale (DICMAPI), University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Director of Center for Advanced Biomaterials for HealthCare@CRIB, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +390817682408
Interests: biomedical engineering; biomaterials; tissue engineering; organ on chip; mechanotrasduction; biosensors and diagnostics; drug delivery; nanomedicine
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Filippo Causa

Interdisciplinary Research Centre on Biomaterials (CRIB) and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale (DICMAPI), University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Center for Advanced Biomaterials for HealthCare@CRIB, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0039 081 7682603
Interests: biomaterials; polymer; microfluidics; biosensors; Lab-on-chip; bioassay; microgels and hydrogels; single cell analysis; intracellular biosensors; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to review, evaluate and understand the complexity of materials as constituents of integrated devices for diagnosis, therapy, and advanced solutions in biomedical field.

Hydrogels, and especially nano and microgels, are assuming an increasingly important role in a variety of applications due to their unmet characteristics including hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, highly flexible chemical characteristics. The non-fouling nature, easy probe accessibility and target diffusion, the possibility of moieties inclusion within their structure, render hydrogels promising substrates for biomedical applications.

Microgels have already been successfully used in immunoassays, sensitive nucleic acid assays, and to enable hydrogel-based suspension arrays. Similarly, nano and microgels are widely used as carriers for therapeutics or contrast agents in drug-delivery and multi-imaging applications. Tissue engineering, as well, benefits of such class of materials to recapitulate functional organs.

This Special Issue will provide the opportunity to understand, analyze, evaluate and possibly address the challenges that these materials pose, highlighting the versatility and flexibility in the synthesis and in the functions with regard to the integration with miniaturized systems (i.e., microTAS, LOC, Tissue on a Chip) and imaging techniques to perform next generation applications.

We invite you to contribute with original research papers, as well as comprehensive reviews, aligned with these themes, to advance and improve the actual state-of-the-art in bioengineering, providing new opportunities, approaches and solutions to biological problems.

Dr. Battista Edmondo
Prof. Dr. Ibthisam Tothill
Prof. Dr. Paolo Antonio Netti
Prof. Dr. Filippo Causa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Liquid Biopsy
  • Bead-based suspension assays
  • Molecularly Imprinted Polymers
  • Oligonucleotide detection
  • microTAS, LOC and TOC
  • Diagnostic assays
  • Nanomedicine
  • Theranostics
  • Tissue Engineering

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Radio-Fluorogenic Gel Dosimetry with Coumarin
Bioengineering 2018, 5(3), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5030053
Received: 8 May 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
PDF Full-text (1656 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gel dosimeters are attractive detectors for radiation therapy, with properties similar to biological tissue and the potential to visualize volumetric dose distributions. Radio-fluorogenesis is the yield of fluorescent chemical products in response to energy deposition from ionizing radiation. This report shares the development
[...] Read more.
Gel dosimeters are attractive detectors for radiation therapy, with properties similar to biological tissue and the potential to visualize volumetric dose distributions. Radio-fluorogenesis is the yield of fluorescent chemical products in response to energy deposition from ionizing radiation. This report shares the development of a novel radio-fluorogenic gel (RFG) dosimeter, gelatin infused with coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid (C3CA), for the quantification of imparted energy. Aqueous solutions exposed to ionizing radiation result in the production of hydroxyl free radicals through water radiolysis. Interactions between hydroxyl free radicals and coumarin-3-carboxylic acid produce a fluorescent product. 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid has a blue (445 nm) emission following ultra-violet (UV) to near UV (365–405 nm) excitation. Effects of C3CA concentration and pH buffers were investigated. The response of the RFG was explored with respect to strength, type, and exposure rate of high-energy radiation. Results show a linear dose response relationship independent of energy and type, with a dose-rate dependency. This report demonstrates increased photo-yield with high pH and the utility of gelatin-RFG for phantom studies of radiation dosimetry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Nano and Micro-Gels for Biomedical Applications)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Generation of Gellan Gum-Based Adipose-Like Microtissues
Bioengineering 2018, 5(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5030052
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
PDF Full-text (3566 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Adipose tissue is involved in many physiological processes. Therefore, the need for adipose tissue-like analogues either for soft tissue reconstruction or as in vitro testing platforms is undeniable. In this work, we explored the natural features of gellan gum (GG) to recreate injectable
[...] Read more.
Adipose tissue is involved in many physiological processes. Therefore, the need for adipose tissue-like analogues either for soft tissue reconstruction or as in vitro testing platforms is undeniable. In this work, we explored the natural features of gellan gum (GG) to recreate injectable stable adipose-like microtissues. GG hydrogel particles with different percentages of polymer (0.5%, 0.75%, 1.25%) were developed and the effect of obtained mechanical properties over the ability of hASCs to differentiate towards the adipogenic lineage was evaluated based on the expression of the early (PPARγ) and late (FABP4) adipogenic markers, and on lipids formation and accumulation. Constructs were cultured in adipogenic induction medium up to 21 days or for six days in induction plus nine days in maintenance media. Overall, no significant differences were observed in terms of hASCs adipogenic differentiation within the range of Young’s moduli between 2.7 and 12.9 kPa. The long-term (up to six weeks) stability of the developed constructs supported its application in soft tissue reconstruction. Moreover, their ability to function as adipose-like microtissue models for drug screening was demonstrated by confirming its sensitivity to TNFα and ROCK inhibitor, respectively involved in the repression and induction of the adipogenic differentiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Nano and Micro-Gels for Biomedical Applications)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Effect of Methylcellulose Molecular Weight on the Properties of Self-Assembling MC-g-PNtBAm Nanogels
Bioengineering 2018, 5(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5020039
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
PDF Full-text (995 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The efficiency of drug delivery to the eye using topical drop therapy is limited by the ocular clearance mechanisms. Nanocarriers, able to encapsulate bioactive compounds and slow down their release, may allow for prolonged on-eye residence times when combined with topical application for
[...] Read more.
The efficiency of drug delivery to the eye using topical drop therapy is limited by the ocular clearance mechanisms. Nanocarriers, able to encapsulate bioactive compounds and slow down their release, may allow for prolonged on-eye residence times when combined with topical application for treatment of ocular conditions. Previously, self-assemblies of methylcellulose (MC) hydrophobized with N-tert-butylacrylamide side chains (MC-g-PNtBAm) were developed. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the impact of the methylcellulose backbone length on the properties of the nanogels. We synthesized MC-g-PNtBAm nanogels using four different molecular weights of MC with two degrees of hydrophobic modification and investigated the physical and chemical properties of the resulting polymeric nanogels. While no significant change could be observed at a high degree of hydrophobization, properties were affected at a lower one. Increasing the molecular weight of MC improved the swelling capacity of the nanogels, increasing their size in water. An effect on the drug release was also noted. Nanogels prepared using MC with a molecular weight of 30 kDa did not retain as much dexamethasone and released it faster compared to those prepared using 230 kDa MC. Thus, besides the degree of hydrophobization, the length of MC chains provides another means of tuning the properties of MC-g-PNtBAm nanogels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Nano and Micro-Gels for Biomedical Applications)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Gelatin–Alginate Hydrogels to Stomach Lumen for Treatment of Gastroparesis
Bioengineering 2018, 5(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5010012
Received: 4 January 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2018 / Accepted: 4 February 2018 / Published: 7 February 2018
PDF Full-text (21424 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Gastroparesis (GP) is associated with depletion of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and enteric neurons, which leads to pyloric dysfunction followed by severe nausea, vomiting and delayed gastric emptying. Regenerating these fundamental structures with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy would be helpful to
[...] Read more.
Gastroparesis (GP) is associated with depletion of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and enteric neurons, which leads to pyloric dysfunction followed by severe nausea, vomiting and delayed gastric emptying. Regenerating these fundamental structures with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy would be helpful to restore gastric function in GP. MSCs have been successfully used in animal models of other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, including colitis. However, no study has been performed with these cells on GP animals. In this study, we explored whether mouse MSCs can be delivered from a hydrogel scaffold to the luminal surfaces of mice stomach explants. Mouse MSCs were seeded atop alginate–gelatin, coated with poly-l-lysine. These cell–gel constructs were placed atop stomach explants facing the luminal side. MSCs grew uniformly all across the gel surface within 48 h. When placed atop the lumen of the stomach, MSCs migrated from the gels to the tissues, as confirmed by positive staining with vimentin and N-cadherin. Thus, the feasibility of transplanting a cell–gel construct to deliver stem cells in the stomach wall was successfully shown in a mice stomach explant model, thereby making a significant advance towards envisioning the transplantation of an entire tissue-engineered ‘gastric patch’ or ‘microgels’ with cells and growth factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Nano and Micro-Gels for Biomedical Applications)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top