Special Issue "Beverages Additives"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ryszard Amarowicz

Department of Chemical and Physical Properties of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Olsztyn, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food analysis; functional foods; bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; antioxidants; chromatography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Beverage additives are the substances that may be incorporated, either directly or indirectly, during processing or storage; and, when introduced purposely, aid in processing or to preserve or improve the quality of a product. Additives are used for beverages to maintain or improve freshness, to improve product consistency, to improve or maintain nutritional value, to maintain palatability and wholesomeness, or to enhance flavor or impart desired color. Some natural additives of plant or animal origin to beverages can shape their health-promoting properties. The use of beverage additives requires appropriate control and sensory and consumer analyses. 

Original and review papers dealing with all aspects of beverage additives are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Beverages. This issue will focus primarily on:

  • Sweeteners, acidity regulators, colorants, flavoring agents, emulsifiers, stabilizers
  • Nutrients
  • Bioactives (natural antioxidants, natural antimicrobial agents, probiotics, prebiotics, phytosterols, omega-3 fatty acids)
  • Sport, energetic, and coffee based drinks
  • Analytical methods used for additives analysis
  • Sensory properties
Prof. Ryszard Amarowicz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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Open AccessReview Potential Safety Issues Surrounding the Use of Benzoate Preservatives
Received: 19 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 5 April 2018 / Published: 11 April 2018
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Abstract
Sodium benzoate (E211) and potassium sorbate (E202) have long been used for large-scale beverage preservation, yet it is potassium sorbate that is now the preferred option for most soft drink manufacturers. Partly this is a reaction to the discovery that benzoate can cause
[...] Read more.
Sodium benzoate (E211) and potassium sorbate (E202) have long been used for large-scale beverage preservation, yet it is potassium sorbate that is now the preferred option for most soft drink manufacturers. Partly this is a reaction to the discovery that benzoate can cause drinks to contain traces of the carcinogen benzene. This benzene is thought to have its origins in a free-radical catalysed reaction of the benzoate with ascorbic acid. However, there may be additional benefits to using potassium sorbate rather than the benzoate preservatives in beverages. In children, a high dietary intake of sodium benzoate may be associated with asthma, allergy, or attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder. Benzoate is now known to influence cognitive functioning. By acting as a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), thereby reducing the DAAO-catalysed degradation of D-serine, it can upregulate the activity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the brain. A high benzoate intake might also generate glycine deficiency, lack of glycine generally exerting a negative impact on brain neurochemistry. There are therefore strong grounds for suspecting that dietary benzoate can have neuromodulatory (mood, learning, and personality) effects and influence child hyperactivity disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverages Additives)

Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note Effect of Carboxymethyl Cellulose Added at the Dosage Stage on the Foamability of a Bottle-Fermented Sparkling Wine
Received: 8 January 2018 / Revised: 16 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 1 April 2018
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Abstract
Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) is used in winemaking to prevent potassium bitartrate or potassium hydrogen tartrate deposits from forming. These deposits are particularly detrimental when occurring in bottle-fermented sparkling wine ahead of disgorging or in the finished product as they can cause gushing of
[...] Read more.
Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) is used in winemaking to prevent potassium bitartrate or potassium hydrogen tartrate deposits from forming. These deposits are particularly detrimental when occurring in bottle-fermented sparkling wine ahead of disgorging or in the finished product as they can cause gushing of the wine when bottles are opened. Despite CMC being used by several sparkling winemaking producers both on the base wine and after disgorging, its effect on the behavior of foam, a key indicator of sparkling wine quality, has not been systematically tested. In this work the effect on wine composition and foam attributes of CMC additions to an English sparkling wine at the dosage stage was assessed. Results showed that CMC did not cause major changes on wine parameters, with the exception of wine viscosity, and did not result in major modification of the foamability of a wine, especially when analyzed in real serving conditions. These results suggest that, at least for the wine analyzed in this work, CMC could be added at the dosage stage without compromising its foam quality attributes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverages Additives)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The Importance of Pectin in Clear and Cloudy Juices

Author: Conrad O. Perera

Affiliation: School of Chemical Sciences, Food Science Program, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand, conradperera@gmail.com

Abstract: Pectin plays a major role in the extraction and stability of juices from a technological point of view. It imparts viscosity and mouthfeel to juices and plays a crucial role in the stability of cloudy and clear juices. Juice is the cell sap that is contained in the vacuole of parenchyma cells, the thin-walled cells of many non-woody plant stems, roots, leaves and fruits. The individual cells are joined together by pectin, which acts as a ‘cement’ to bind the parenchyma cells together in the tissue. In the intact fruit tissue, various organelles are compartmentalized and exist isolated from each other within the parenchyma cells. In order to extract the juice, the compartmentalization of the fruit tissues needs to be broken. A fundamental knowledge of the biology and structure of parenchyma cells is necessary to understand the role pectin plays in the manufacture of juices. This paper discusses how protein–pectin micelles are formed during juice extraction, which contributes to the cloudiness of freshly extracted juices. It also discusses the science behind the stability of cloudy juices during processing and storage, the action of various naturally occurring pectinase enzymes on the pectin molecules and their effect on the stability of cloudy and clear juices and the concentration of clear juices.

Key words: parenchyma cells, pectin, protopectin, juice, cloud stability

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