Neuroscience and Well-Being at Work: New Measurement Perspectives

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Organizational Behaviors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 4177

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Business, Law, Economics and Consumer Behaviour “Carlo A. Ricciardi”, Università IULM, 20143 Milan, Italy
Interests: positive psychology; well-being at work; neuromanagement; neuromarketing
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Guest Editor
Department of Business, Law, Economics and Consumption “Carlo A. Ricciardi”, Faculty of Communication, Public relations and Advertising, IULM University, Milan, Italy
Interests: neuromarketing; neuromanagement; consumer behavior

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Guest Editor
Center for Neuroeconomics Studies, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
Interests: neuroeconomics; neuromanagement; consumer neuroscience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With this Special Issue we would like to focus on well-being at work and its link with neuroscientific perspectives and measurement.

Studies indicate that work is a crucial element for individuals’ well-being, as it increases the lifespan, is associated with identity, and provides tasks, social opportunities, and the possibility to be involved in new challenges and new social status. Moreover, a relevant component of well-being is identified in emotions: in particular, the hedonic approach of well-being suggests psychological well-being in the presence of positive emotions and the absence of negative emotions, leading individuals to experiment with subjective well-being.

Neuroscientific approaches and tools applied to organizational issues can contribute to the understanding of emotional states and cognitive processes. This could help to deepen organizational behaviors and aid in the development of organizational theories. In particular, neuroscience applied to management and organizational issues focuses on the brain processes deriving from the dynamics in an organization and helps to detect human brain actions and interactions in the business context. In this sense, neuroscience applied to organizational issues is functional for the emotional brain and the building of social connections, helping organizations in managing emotions in the workplace and designing positive emotional and collaborative workplaces.

In this Special Issue, we invite authors to contribute research that deepens and examines the role of the neuroscientific approach and measurement among workplaces, detecting how workspaces, emotions, relationships (including trust and leadership), assessment processes, and different organizational dynamics can affect organizational and subjective well-being. The aim is to work with authors to add new perspectives, knowledge, and applied solutions to organizational psychology, specifically to organizational well-being issues. 

Dr. Margherita Zito
Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Russo
Prof. Dr. Paul J. Zak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • organizational well-being
  • subjective well-being
  • neuroscientific measurement
  • emotions
  • neuromanagement
  • leadership
  • organizational relationships
  • trust
  • workspaces

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

25 pages, 743 KiB  
Article
From Coaching to Neurocoaching: A Neuroscientific Approach during a Coaching Session to Assess the Relational Dynamics between Coach and Coachee—A Pilot Study
by Riccardo Valesi, Giorgio Gabrielli, Margherita Zito, Mara Bellati, Marco Bilucaglia, Alessia Caponetto, Alessandro Fici, Annarita Galanto, Massimiliano Giuseppe Falcone and Vincenzo Russo
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13070596 - 16 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3315
Abstract
Life transitions represent moments characterized by changes that can profoundly influence individual life trajectories and subjective well-being. Recently, career coaching has become an important method of helping people expand their self-awareness, facilitate personal development, and increase their performance in the school-to-work transition. Although [...] Read more.
Life transitions represent moments characterized by changes that can profoundly influence individual life trajectories and subjective well-being. Recently, career coaching has become an important method of helping people expand their self-awareness, facilitate personal development, and increase their performance in the school-to-work transition. Although previous studies have confirmed that one of the most important keys to the success of a coaching program is the quality of the relationship between coach and coachee, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how to objectively measure it. In this pilot study, we adopted a neuroscientific approach to introduce objective measures of the relationship between coach and coachee through the phases of a coaching session. A sample of 14 university students and a professional coach participated in career-coaching sessions while their affective states were measured by recording brain (EEG) and physiological (Skin conductance) activity. Electroencephalographic indicators of valence, arousal, and engagement showed differences between session phases, highlighting the possibility of a neurophysiological measurement of relational dynamics. Our results provide initial evidence that neurophysiological activity can be considered a way to understand differences in the coach-coachee relationship, thereby providing information on the effectiveness of coaching interventions and facilitating a better life transition from school to work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroscience and Well-Being at Work: New Measurement Perspectives)
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