Special Issue "Consumer Neurosciences"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Joseph Ciorciari

1 Department of Psychological Sciences, Centre for Mental Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts & Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn Victoria 3122, Australia
2 Visiting professor, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, La Sapienza University of Rome, Roma 00185, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, Neuroimaging, Electrophysiology, Psychophysiology, Biology of personality, Consumer Neuroscience, Mental Health and Public Health Communication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Predicting consumer behaviour has proven difficult despite well designed traditional market research measures. Advances in the neurosciences have not only demonstrated the inner workings of the brain, but have been able to demonstrate and quantify emotional and cognitive processes associated with decision making. In particular they have been able to highlight the role of emotion and unconscious processes in decision-making and consumer choice. Nonetheless, consumer neuroscience is still an emerging field but with limited sound methodological research and design guidelines spanning the fields of social psychology, marketing and cognitive neuroscience.

Also, applications of neuromarketing to improve the quality of like for the community have been scarce. Areas such as community welfare, the effects of sports fanaticism, drink driving, impact of social media, understanding conservation & charitable behaviors and community health have not been explored fully. As such, the use of traditional marketing techniques and the inclusion of consumer neuroscience in improving health communications has been limited. The developing field of consumer neuroscience may be useful in developing the correct approach and research, to design better health communications, which may help to save a life, while reducing expenditure on unsuccessful campaigns.

This special issue provides a an opportunity to report current neuroscience studies that aim to identify the potential use of neuroscience tools to analyze public health and social cause marketing campaigns.

Assoc. Prof. Joseph Ciorciari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Consumer Neuroscience
  • Public health communications
  • Community issues
  • Neuromarketing
  • Decision making
  • Consumer personality
  • Social Causes
  • Research Design

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Consumer Neuroscience and Digital/Social Media Health/Social Cause Advertisement Effectiveness
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9040042
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 14 April 2019 / Published: 18 April 2019
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Abstract
This research investigated the use of consumer neuroscience to improve and determine the effectiveness of action/emotion-based public health and social cause (HSC) advertisements. Action-based advertisements ask individuals to ‘do something’ such as ‘act’, ‘share’, make a ‘pledge’ or complete a ‘challenge’ on behalf [...] Read more.
This research investigated the use of consumer neuroscience to improve and determine the effectiveness of action/emotion-based public health and social cause (HSC) advertisements. Action-based advertisements ask individuals to ‘do something’ such as ‘act’, ‘share’, make a ‘pledge’ or complete a ‘challenge’ on behalf of a brand, such as doing ‘something good, somewhere, for someone else’. Public health messages as noncommercial advertisements attempt to positively change behavioural intent or increase awareness. Australian health expenditure was $180.7 billion AUD (Australian dollars) in 2016/17 with $17 million AUD spent on government health campaigns. However, evaluation of health advertisement effectiveness has been difficult to determine. Few studies use neuroscience techniques with traditional market research methods. A 2-part study with an exploratory design was conducted using (1) electroencephalography (EEG) using a 64 channel EEG wet cap (n = 47); and (2) a Qualtrics online psychometric survey (n = 256). Participants were asked to make a donation before and after viewing 7 HSC digital/social media advertisements and logos (6 action/emotion-based; 1 control) to measure changes in behavioural intent. Attention is considered a key factor in determining advertising effectiveness. EEG results showed theta synchronisation (increase)/alpha desynchronisation (decrease) indicating attention with episodic memory encoding. sLORETA results displayed approach responses to action/emotion-based advertisements with left prefrontal and right parietal cortex activation. EEG and survey results showed the greatest liking for the ManUp action/emotion-based advertisement which used male facial expressions of raw emotion and vulnerability. ManUp also had the highest increased amount donated after viewing. Lower theta amplitude results for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) action/emotion-based advertisement indicated that novel (possessing distinct features) rather than attractive/conventional faces were more appealing, while the rapid presentation of faces was less effective. None of the highest peak amplitudes for each ad occurred when viewing brand logos within the advertisement. This research contributes to the academic consumer neuroscience, advertising effectiveness, and social media literature with the use of action/challenge/emotion-based marketing strategies, which remains limited, while demonstrating the value in combining EEG and neuroscientific techniques with traditional market research methods. The research provides a greater understanding of advertising effectiveness and changes in behavioural intent with managerial implications regarding the effective use of action/challenge/emotion-based HSC communications to potentially help save a life and reduce expenditure on ineffectual HSC marketing campaigns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Neurosciences)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Perception and Deception: Human Beauty and the Brain
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9040034
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 25 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
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Abstract
Human physical characteristics and their perception by the brain are under pressure by natural selection to optimize reproductive success. Men and women have different strategies to appear attractive and have different interests in identifying beauty in people. Nevertheless, men and women from all [...] Read more.
Human physical characteristics and their perception by the brain are under pressure by natural selection to optimize reproductive success. Men and women have different strategies to appear attractive and have different interests in identifying beauty in people. Nevertheless, men and women from all cultures agree on who is and who is not attractive, and throughout the world attractive people show greater acquisition of resources and greater reproductive success than others. The brain employs at least three modules, composed of interconnected brain regions, to judge facial attractiveness: one for identification, one for interpretation and one for valuing. Key elements that go into the judgment are age and health, as well as symmetry, averageness, face and body proportions, facial color and texture. These elements are all Costly Signals of reproductive fitness because they are difficult to fake. However, people deceive others using tricks such as coloring hair, cosmetics and clothing styles, while at the same time they also focus on detecting fakes. People may also deceive themselves, especially about their own attractiveness, and use self-signally actions to demonstrate to themselves their own true value. The neuroscience of beauty is best understood by considering the evolutionary pressures to maximize reproductive fitness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Neurosciences)
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