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Article

Providing Excellent Customer Service Is Therapeutic: Insights from an Implicit Association Neuromarketing Study

1
Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Singapore
2
School of Business, 4 Nethergate, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
3
Split Second Research Limited, London E1 8FA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(10), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9100109
Received: 29 July 2019 / Revised: 28 September 2019 / Accepted: 8 October 2019 / Published: 14 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Neurosciences)
This paper reports the results of a combined biometric and implicit affective priming study of the emotional consequences of being the provider or receiver of either positive or negative customer service experiences. The study was conducted in two stages. Study 1 captured the moment-by-moment implicit emotional and physiological responses associated with receiving and providing good customer service. Study 2 employed an affective priming task to evaluate the implicit associations with good and poor customer service in a large sample of 1200 respondents across three Western countries. Our results show that both giving and receiving good customer service was perceived as pleasurable (Study 1) and at the same time, was implicitly associated with positive feelings (Study 2). The authors discuss the implications of the research for service providers in terms of the impact of these interactions on employee wellbeing, staff retention rates and customer satisfaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: customer service; employee retention; semantic priming; implicit reaction time; cognitive neuroscience; neuromarketing customer service; employee retention; semantic priming; implicit reaction time; cognitive neuroscience; neuromarketing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Calvert, G.A.; Pathak, A.; Ching, L.E.A.; Trufil, G.; Fulcher, E.P. Providing Excellent Customer Service Is Therapeutic: Insights from an Implicit Association Neuromarketing Study. Behav. Sci. 2019, 9, 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9100109

AMA Style

Calvert GA, Pathak A, Ching LEA, Trufil G, Fulcher EP. Providing Excellent Customer Service Is Therapeutic: Insights from an Implicit Association Neuromarketing Study. Behavioral Sciences. 2019; 9(10):109. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9100109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Calvert, Gemma A., Abhishek Pathak, Lim E.A. Ching, Geraldine Trufil, and Eamon P. Fulcher 2019. "Providing Excellent Customer Service Is Therapeutic: Insights from an Implicit Association Neuromarketing Study" Behavioral Sciences 9, no. 10: 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9100109

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