Neurophysiological and Behavioral Responses to Stressful Situations, Training, Therapies or Illness

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Experimental and Clinical Neurosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2024 | Viewed by 607

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue delves into the intricate connections between physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses obtained during stressful scenarios, training programs, therapeutic interventions, and illnesses. In an era marked by constant challenges, understanding how the human body and mind react to stimuli is crucial. This research addresses the pressing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms governing these responses. By exploring gaps in existing knowledge, our aim is to emphasize the critical necessity for further investigation and refinement.

Contributions to this issue will illuminate complex pathways linking physiological, neurophysiological, and behavioral responses, offering insights that inform both academia and practical applications. The outcomes are poised to refine interventions, enhance training methodologies, improve therapeutic practices, and deepen our understanding in these topics.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to collate original research, review articles, cross-sectional studies or case reports focused on these aspects.

Prof. Dr. Juan Pedro Fuentes García
Dr. Santos Villafaina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • EEG
  • HRV
  • training load
  • biomarkers
  • fitness
  • periodization
  • mental load
  • fatigue
  • exercise
  • pathology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 534 KiB  
Article
The Correlation between Motor Skill Proficiency and Academic Performance in High School Students
by Domingo Jesús Ramos-Campo and Vicente Javier Clemente-Suárez
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(7), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14070592 - 12 Jul 2024
Viewed by 335
Abstract
The intricate relationship between physical health and cognitive development has been a focal point of multidisciplinary research, suggesting that motor skill proficiency could influence academic outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between motor control, mobility, stability—measured by the Functional Movement Screen [...] Read more.
The intricate relationship between physical health and cognitive development has been a focal point of multidisciplinary research, suggesting that motor skill proficiency could influence academic outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between motor control, mobility, stability—measured by the Functional Movement Screen (FMS)—and academic performance among high school students. Conducted with 201 participants from a public high school in Spain, this descriptive non-experimental research divided students into high and low academic performance groups based on their average grade scores, with the median used as the criterion for distinction. The FMS was utilized to assess fundamental motor skills, and academic performance was verified across mathematics, language, science, and physical education subjects. The findings revealed a significant positive relationship between the FMS scores and academic achievement (r = 0.691; p < 0.001), indicating that students with higher motor skill proficiency had higher academic achievement. This correlation persisted across the various subjects, highlighting the potential benefits of integrating physical education and motor skill development into educational strategies. The study’s results suggest that educational policies should advocate for comprehensive physical education programs to foster both physical well-being and academic improvement, thereby promoting a holistic educational model that enhances student performance across disciplines. Full article
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