Special Issue "Electrochemical Battery Lifetime Testing, Analysis and Estimation"

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Daniel-Ioan Stroe

Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstræde 111, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: energy storage; lithium-ion batteries; battery performance and lifetime testing; accelerated aging; battery performance-degradation modeling; battery state estimation; aging mechanisms; power and energy management strategies; hybrid renewable energy systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past decade, electrochemical batteries have been developed as the key energy storage technology for a wide range of applications, from portable devices to electric vehicles and renewable energy storage systems. However, batteries are complex and non-linear devices, with their performance and lifetime strongly dependent on operating conditions. Thus, in order to benefit from their characteristics and to assess their suitability for a certain application, the lifetime and degradation behavior (e.g., capacity fade, power degradation) of a battery needs to be known and understood. Subsequently, power and energy management strategies can be developed, which would allow for lifetime maximization and battery cost optimization.

This Special Issue of Batteries focuses on various aspects regarding the lifetime and degradation behavior of batteries. Topics of interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Lifetime testing of electrochemical batteries (e.g., Lithium-ion, NiMH, Lead-acid but also newer chemistries, such as Lithium­–Sulfur, Sodium Sulfur, etc.)
  • Accelerated aging methods for batteries
  • Battery lifetime modeling (e.g., electrochemical modeling, performance-degradation modeling, cycle counting, etc.)
  • Assessment of battery performance parameters degradation during cycle and calendar aging (e.g., capacity fade, resistance increase, power degradation, etc.)
  • Aging mechanisms
  • Lifetime and performance-degradation estimation of batteries in various applications (e.g., e-mobility, renewable energy storage systems, UPSs, etc.)
  • Optimal energy management strategies for batteries considering their performance-degradation behavior.

Assoc. Prof. Daniel-Ioan Stroe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemical Batteries
  • Lifetime Testing
  • Accelerated Ageing
  • Capacity Fade and Power Degradation
  • Calendar and Cycle Lifetime
  • Performance-Degradation Modeling
  • Lifetime Estimation and Investigation
  • Aging Mechanisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Electrochemical Performance and in Operando Charge Efficiency Measurements of Cu/Sn-Doped Nano Iron Electrodes
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 6 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract
Fe-air or Ni-Fe cells can offer low-cost and large-scale sustainable energy storage. At present, they are limited by low coulombic efficiency, low active material use, and poor rate capability. To overcome these challenges, two types of nanostructured doped iron materials were investigated: (1)
[...] Read more.
Fe-air or Ni-Fe cells can offer low-cost and large-scale sustainable energy storage. At present, they are limited by low coulombic efficiency, low active material use, and poor rate capability. To overcome these challenges, two types of nanostructured doped iron materials were investigated: (1) copper and tin doped iron (CuSn); and (2) tin doped iron (Sn). Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was added to the electrode and LiOH to the electrolyte. In the 2 wt. % Cu + 2 wt. % Sn sample, the addition of SWCNT increased the discharge capacity from 430 to 475 mAh g−1, and charge efficiency increased from 83% to 93.5%. With the addition of both SWCNT and LiOH, the charge efficiency and discharge capacity improved to 91% and 603 mAh g−1, respectively. Meanwhile, the 4 wt. % Sn substituted sample performance is not on par with the 2 wt. % Cu + 2 wt. % Sn sample. The dopant elements (Cu and Sn) and additives (SWCNT and LiOH) have a major impact on the electrode performance. To understand the relation between hydrogen evolution and charge current density, we have used in operando charging measurements combined with mass spectrometry to quantify the evolved hydrogen. The electrodes that were subjected to prolonged overcharge upon hydrogen evolution failed rapidly. This insight could help in the development of better charging schemes for the iron electrodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Battery Lifetime Testing, Analysis and Estimation)
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Open AccessArticle An Experimental Setup with Alternating Current Capability for Evaluating Large Lithium-Ion Battery Cells
Received: 20 July 2018 / Revised: 2 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
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Abstract
In the majority of applications using lithium-ion batteries, batteries are exposed to some harmonic content apart from the main charging/discharging current. The understanding of the effects that alternating currents have on batteries requires specific characterization methods and accurate measurement equipment. The lack of
[...] Read more.
In the majority of applications using lithium-ion batteries, batteries are exposed to some harmonic content apart from the main charging/discharging current. The understanding of the effects that alternating currents have on batteries requires specific characterization methods and accurate measurement equipment. The lack of commercial battery testers with high alternating current capability simultaneously to the ability of operating at frequencies above 200 Hz, led to the design of the presented experimental setup. Additionally, the experimental setup expands the state-of-the-art of lithium-ion batteries testers by incorporating relevant lithium-ion battery cell characterization routines, namely hybrid pulse power current, incremental capacity analysis and galvanic intermittent titration technique. In this paper the hardware and the measurement capabilities of the experimental setup are presented. Moreover, the measurements errors due to the setup’s instruments were analysed to ensure lithium-ion batteries cell characterization quality. Finally, this paper presents preliminary results of capacity fade tests where 28 Ah cells were cycled with and without the injection of 21 A alternating at 1 kHz. Up to 300 cycles, no significant fade in cell capacity may be measured, meaning that alternating currents may not be as harmful for lithium-ion batteries as considered so far. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Battery Lifetime Testing, Analysis and Estimation)
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Figure 1

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