Special Issue "Regulated and Non-regulated Organic Pollutants in the Atmosphere: Distribution, Transport and Transformation"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Judith A. Perlinger

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Towensend Dr., Houghton, 49931 United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: transport and transformation of organic pollutants; atmosphere–biosphere exchange of chemicals; air and water quality; environmental analytical chemistry; sustainability
Guest Editor
Dr. Pernilla Bohlin-Nizzetto

NILU, Norwegian Institute for Air Research, P.O. Box 100, NO-2027 Kjeller, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: semi-volatile organic pollutants; long-range transport; local emissions; air sampling methodologies; indoor environments; time-trends; new organic pollutants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic pollutants in the atmosphere can cause health impairments to humans and other organisms following uptake via respiration, dermal contact, or ingestion. Biomagnification following transport and deposition can increase risks associated with dietary uptake. Transformation of organic pollutants in the atmosphere or following deposition to vegetation, soils or water can also render reaction products more or less toxic than their precursors. Given their wide range in vapor pressure, organic pollutants can be present as gases and/or associated with particles in the atmosphere. This phase distribution in turn has profound effects not only on atmospheric transport and transformation, but also on exposure pathways and associated risks. Thus, understanding atmospheric transport and/or transformation of organic pollutants is crucial to understanding health risks posed by these chemicals.

For this Special Issue, we welcome studies of transport and transformation of toxic organic pollutants in the atmosphere, including theoretical studies, laboratory experiments, field in-situ experiments or monitoring, modeling studies, and combinations thereof. Studies can be conducted at a local, regional, or global scale. Because our ability to understand atmospheric transport and transformation can be limited by analytical capabilities, new developments in this realm are also welcome.

Prof. Judith A. Perlinger
Dr. Pernilla Bohlin-Nizzetto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Regulated and nonregulated toxic organic pollutants
  • Atmospheric transport and transformation
  • Risk assessment
  • Multiscale atmospheric distribution
  • Atmospheric modeling
  • Targeted and nontargeted analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Risk Assessment of Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds in Metro Carriage in Shanghai, China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(6), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10060302
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 27 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
Air quality in transportation microenvironment has received widespread attention. In this study, the exposure levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter that have a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) in Shanghai metro system were measured simultaneously, and their risks [...] Read more.
Air quality in transportation microenvironment has received widespread attention. In this study, the exposure levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter that have a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) in Shanghai metro system were measured simultaneously, and their risks to human health under different driving conditions were then assessed. The results showed that VOCs, PM2.5 concentrations and life cancer risk (LCR) of four VOCs (benzene, formaldehyde, ethylbenzene, and acetaldehyde) in the old metro carriages were about 3 times, 3 times and 2 times higher than those in the new metro carriages, respectively. This difference can be ascribed to the fact that air filtration system in the new metro trains is significantly improved. The VOC levels, PM2.5 concentrations and LCR of VOCs on the above-ground track were slightly higher than those on the underground track. This is due to less outdoor polluted air entering into the carriage on the underground track. Number of passengers also had an effect on VOCs and PM2.5 concentrations in metro carriages. Additionally, the LCR of VOCs inside metro trains should not be ignored (7.69 × 10−6~1.47 × 10−5), especially inside old metro trains with the old ventilation system. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fundamentals of Ornamental Plants in Removing Benzene in Indoor Air
Atmosphere 2019, 10(4), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10040221
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 24 April 2019
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Abstract
The concentration of benzene in indoor air has received appreciable attention due to its adverse health effects. Although phytoremediation has been considered as an eco-friendly method to remove benzene, it is unclear how to select plants with a high removal rate. In this [...] Read more.
The concentration of benzene in indoor air has received appreciable attention due to its adverse health effects. Although phytoremediation has been considered as an eco-friendly method to remove benzene, it is unclear how to select plants with a high removal rate. In this study, we evaluated the benzene removal efficiency of four common ornamental plants, Epipremnum aureum, Chlorophytum comosum, Hedera helix and Echinopsis tubiflora, and we also explored the factors impacting benzene removal efficiency. The removal efficiency of all plants in this study averaged at 72 percent. The benzene absorption rates of Epipremnum aureum, Hedera helix and Chlorophytum comosum were 1.10, 0.85 and 0.27 µg·m−3·cm−2, respectively. This is due to the different transpiration rates and chlorophyll concentrations in the plants. The benzene removal efficiency of crassulacean acid metabolism plant (Echinopsis tubiflora) was 23% higher than C3 plant (Epipremnum aureum) under dark conditions. This can be attributed to the fact that the characteristic of Echinopsis tubiflora stomata is different from Epipremnum aureum stomata, which is still open under dark conditions. Therefore, Echinopsis tubiflora can take up more benzene than Epipremnum aureum. For different initial benzene concentrations, the benzene removal efficiency of Echinopsis tubiflora was always great (50–80%), owing to its high rate of transpiration and concentration of chlorophyll. Our findings indicate that transpiration rate and chlorophyll concentration can be used as reference parameters to facilitate ornamental plant screening for indoor air quality improvement. Full article
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