Special Issue "Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Oleg Romanovskii
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055, Russia
Interests: lidar sounding; atmosphere; gas analysis; ozone; remote spectroscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gennadii Matvienko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055, Russia
Interests: laser sensing; wind lidar; aerosol physcs
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect current novel papers, presented at the 26th International Conference “Atmospheric and Ocean Optics. Atmospheric Physics” (AOO—2020). We invite researchers to contribute original research papers, dealing with all aspects of atmospheric and ocean optics and atmospheric physics. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Molecular spectroscopy of atmospheric gases;
  • Absorption of radiation in atmosphere and ocean;
  • Radiative regime and climate problems;
  • Models and databases for the problems of atmospheric optics and physics;
  • Optical radiation propagation in the atmosphere and ocean;
  • Wave propagation in random inhomogeneous media;
  • Nonlinear effects at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and water media;
  • Laser and acoustic sounding of atmosphere and ocean;
  • Physics of the troposphere;
  • Structure and dynamics of the lower and middle atmosphere;
  • Dynamics of the atmosphere and climate of the Asian region;
  • Physics of the upper atmosphere;
  • Climatological studies of the upper atmosphere using GNSS;
  • The relationship processes in the lithosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

Dr. Oleg Romanovskii
Dr. Gennadii Matvienko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • molecular spectroscopy
  • atmospheric radiative processes
  • optical radiation propagation
  • nonlinear effects in atmosphere
  • laser sounding
  • physics of the troposphere
  • climatological studies
  • physics of the upper atmosphere

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II
Atmosphere 2021, 12(4), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040430 - 26 Mar 2021
Viewed by 297
Abstract
The Atmosphere Special Issue entitled “Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II” comprises eight original papers [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)

Research

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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Balloons and Quadcopters: Intercomparison of Two Low-Cost Wind Profiling Methods
Atmosphere 2021, 12(3), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12030380 - 14 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 404
Abstract
Experimental field campaigns are an essential part of atmospheric research, as well as of university education in the field of atmospheric physics and meteorology. Experimental field observations are needed to improve the understanding of the surface-atmosphere interaction and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) physics [...] Read more.
Experimental field campaigns are an essential part of atmospheric research, as well as of university education in the field of atmospheric physics and meteorology. Experimental field observations are needed to improve the understanding of the surface-atmosphere interaction and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) physics and develop corresponding model parameterizations. Information on the ABL wind profiles is essential for the interpretation of other observations. However, wind profile measurements above the surface layer remain challenging and expensive, especially for the field campaigns performed in remote places and harsh conditions. In this study, we consider the experience of using two low-cost methods for the wind profiling, which may be easily applied in the field studies with modest demands on logistical opportunities, available infrastructure, and budget. The first one is a classical and well-known method of pilot balloon sounding, i.e., when balloon is treated as a Lagrangian particle and tracked by theodolite observations of angular coordinates. Second one is based on a vertical sounding with a popular and relatively cheap mass-market quadcopter DJI Phantom 4 Pro and utilizes its built-in opportunity to restore the wind vector from quadcopter tilt angles. Both methods demonstrated reasonable agreement and applicability even in harsh weather conditions and complex terrain. Advantages and shortcomings of these methods, as well as practical recommendations for their use are discussed. For the drone-based wind estimation, the importance of calibration by comparison to high-quality wind observations is shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Connected Variations of Meteorological and Electrical Quantities of Surface Atmosphere under the Influence of Heavy Rain
Atmosphere 2020, 11(11), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111195 - 04 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 393
Abstract
The electrical state of the surface atmosphere changes significantly under the influence of cloudiness and atmospheric phenomena, including atmospheric precipitation. These features can be used for possible diagnostics of precipitation and improvement of their characteristics based on variations of atmospheric-electrical quantities in the [...] Read more.
The electrical state of the surface atmosphere changes significantly under the influence of cloudiness and atmospheric phenomena, including atmospheric precipitation. These features can be used for possible diagnostics of precipitation and improvement of their characteristics based on variations of atmospheric-electrical quantities in the surface layer. Studies of variations of meteorological and atmospheric-electrical quantities in the surface layer were carried out during the heavy rainfall associated with the cumulonimbus (Cb) clouds passage. Meteorological and atmospheric-electrical observations in the Geophysical Observatory of the Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems are presented in this paper. Precipitation data are used to identify periods of heavy rainfall ≥ 5 mm/h. Information of weather stations and satellites is used to separate the heavy rainfall events by synoptic conditions like thunderstorms and showers of frontal or internal air masses. We find that rains associated with the frontal Cb clouds produce more abrupt changes in negative electrical conductivity in comparison with the Cb clouds in internal air masses. The significant increase in negative electrical conductivity (more than two times vs. normal values) occurs typically during the passage of frontal Cb and heavy rain with droplet size greater than 4 mm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulation of Meteorological Conditions and Air Quality above Tomsk, West Siberia
Atmosphere 2020, 11(11), 1148; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111148 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 508
Abstract
This paper presents the simulation results of meteorological and air quality parameters for the Siberian city of Tomsk predicted by mesoscale meteorological and chemical transport models. Changes in the numerically predicted wind velocity fields, temperature, and concentration of major air pollutants were modelled [...] Read more.
This paper presents the simulation results of meteorological and air quality parameters for the Siberian city of Tomsk predicted by mesoscale meteorological and chemical transport models. Changes in the numerically predicted wind velocity fields, temperature, and concentration of major air pollutants were modelled in detail for the selected dates, when anticyclonic weather with cloud free and calm wind conditions was observed in Tomsk. The simulation results have shown that stable or neutral atmospheric stratification with light wind and low ambient air temperature (−30, −20 °C) are the most unfavorable meteorological conditions leading to the near surface pollutants accumulation. The numerical calculation results were compared with observation data from the Joint Use Center (JUC) “Atmosphere” of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (IAO) and showed good agreement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Temperature Correction of the Vertical Ozone Distribution Retrieval at the Siberian Lidar Station Using the MetOp and Aura Data
Atmosphere 2020, 11(11), 1139; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111139 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 478
Abstract
The purpose of the work is to study the influence of temperature correction on ozone vertical distribution (OVD) in the upper troposphere–stratosphere in the altitude range~(5–45) km, using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), operating at the sensing wavelengths 299/341 nm and 308/353 nm. We [...] Read more.
The purpose of the work is to study the influence of temperature correction on ozone vertical distribution (OVD) in the upper troposphere–stratosphere in the altitude range~(5–45) km, using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), operating at the sensing wavelengths 299/341 nm and 308/353 nm. We analyze the results of lidar measurements, obtained using meteorological data from MLS/Aura and IASI/MetOp satellites and temperature model, at the wavelengths of 299/341 nm and 308/353 nm in 2018 at Siberian Lidar Station (SLS) of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. To estimate how the temperature correction of absorption cross-sections influences the OVD retrieval from lidar measurements, we calculated the deviations of the difference between two profiles, retrieved using satellite- and model-based temperatures. Two temperature seasons were singled out to analyze how real temperature influences the retrieved OVD profiles. In the stratosphere, when satellite-derived temperature and model are used for retrieval, the deviations may reach absolute values of ozone concentration in the range from −0.97 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 19.7 km to 1.05 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 25.3 km during winter–spring season, and from −0.17 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at height of 17.4 km to 0.27 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 40 km in summer–fall period. In the troposphere, when satellite-derived temperature is used in the retrieval, the deviations may reach absolute values of ozone concentration in the range from −1.95 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 18.6 km to 1.23 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 18.2 km during winter–spring season, and from −0.15 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at height of 11.4 km to 0.3 × 1012 molecules × cm−3 at 8 km during summer–fall season. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Modeling of Formation and Rise of Gas and Dust Cloud from Large Scale Commercial Blasting
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1112; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101112 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 596
Abstract
The emission of dust particles into the atmosphere during rock mass breaking by blasting in ore mining open-pits is one of the factors that determine the ground-level air pollution in the vicinity of pits. The data on dust concentration in the cloud, which [...] Read more.
The emission of dust particles into the atmosphere during rock mass breaking by blasting in ore mining open-pits is one of the factors that determine the ground-level air pollution in the vicinity of pits. The data on dust concentration in the cloud, which is extremely difficult to obtain experimentally for large-scale explosions, is required to calculate the dust dispersion in the wind stream. We have elaborated a Eulerian model to simulate the initial stage of dust cloud formation and rising, and a Navier–Stokes model to simulate thermal rising and mixing with the ambient air. The first model is used to describe the dust cloud formation after a 500 t TNT (Trinitrotoluene equivalent) explosion. The second model based on the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method is used to predict the height of cloud rising, its mass, and the evolution of dust particles size distribution for explosions of 1–1000 t TNT. It was found that the value of the turbulent eddy viscosity coefficient (Smagorinsky coefficient) depends on both the charge mass and the spatial resolution (grid cell size). The values of the Smagorinsky coefficient were found for charges with a mass of 1–1000 t using a specific grid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Mobile Aerosol Raman Polarizing Lidar LOSA-A2 for Atmospheric Sounding
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1032; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101032 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 576
Abstract
The mobile aerosol Raman polarizing lidar LOSA-A2 designed at V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS is presented. Its main technical specifications are given. The lidar carries out sounding of the atmosphere of a Nd:YAG laser at two wavelengths, 1064 nm and [...] Read more.
The mobile aerosol Raman polarizing lidar LOSA-A2 designed at V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS is presented. Its main technical specifications are given. The lidar carries out sounding of the atmosphere of a Nd:YAG laser at two wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm. Optical selection of lidar signals at these wavelengths is performed by two identical telescopes with diameters of 120 mm and a focal length of 500 mm. In the visible channel, the signal is divided into two orthogonal polarized components, and a Raman signal at a wavelength of 607 nm is separated. The lidar was tested in aircraft and ship research expeditions. Results of the study of spatial aerosol distribution over the Baikal with the use of LOSA-A2 lidar received during ship-based research expeditions are described. The first in situ tests of the lidar were carried out in an aircraft expedition in the north of Western Siberia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Open AccessArticle
Estimating the Effect of Radiative Feedback Uncertainties on Climate Response to Changes in the Concentration of Stratospheric Aerosols
Atmosphere 2020, 11(6), 654; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11060654 - 19 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 573
Abstract
Using the two-box energy balance model (EBM), we explore the climate system response to radiative forcing generated by variations in the concentrations of stratospheric aerosols and estimate the effect of uncertainties in radiative feedbacks on changes in global mean surface temperature anomaly used [...] Read more.
Using the two-box energy balance model (EBM), we explore the climate system response to radiative forcing generated by variations in the concentrations of stratospheric aerosols and estimate the effect of uncertainties in radiative feedbacks on changes in global mean surface temperature anomaly used as an indicator of the response of the climate system to external radiative perturbations. Radiative forcing generated by stratospheric sulfate aerosols from the second-largest volcanic eruption in the 20th century, the Mount Pinatubo eruption in June 1991, was chosen for this research. The global mean surface temperature response to a specified change in radiative forcing is estimated as a convolution of the derived impulse response function corresponding to EBM with a function that describes the temporal change in radiative forcing. The influence of radiative feedback uncertainties on changes in the global mean surface temperature is estimated using several “versions” of the EBM. The parameters for different “versions” were identified by applying a specific procedure for calibrating the two-box EBM parameters using the results of climate change simulations conducted with coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). Changes in the global mean surface temperature caused by stratospheric aerosol forcing are found to be highly sensitive not only to radiative feedbacks but also to climate system inertia defined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere–land–ocean mixed layer system, as well as to deep-ocean heat uptake. The results obtained have direct implications for a better understanding of how uncertainties in climate feedbacks, climate system inertia and deep-ocean heat uptake affect climate change modelling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
NLOS Communication: Theory and Experiments in the Atmosphere and Underwater
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101122 - 19 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 597
Abstract
In this paper, we present investigations of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communication carried out in Russia and in collaboration with researchers in Israel. The theories of radiative transfer and linear systems provide the theoretical basis for this joint research, and experimental results demonstrate that maximal [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present investigations of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) communication carried out in Russia and in collaboration with researchers in Israel. The theories of radiative transfer and linear systems provide the theoretical basis for this joint research, and experimental results demonstrate that maximal ranges for NLOS communication through atmospheric channels can reach hundreds of kilometers in the visible range and tens of kilometers in the ultraviolet (UV) range of the spectrum. Finally, we predict the range of bistatic underwater communication systems can reach hundreds of meters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics II)
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