Special Issue "Impacts of Indoor Air Pollution on Cardiopulmonary System"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kai-Jen Chuang

Department of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886919444256
Interests: air pollution measurement, prevention, and intervention; cardiovascular health; respiratory health; environmental epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor air pollution is a high-priority risk across the world. The leading health outcome attributed to indoor air pollution is cardiovascular disease. The World Health Organization has announced that 3.8 million deaths worldwide in 2016 were linked to household/indoor air pollution exposure. Approximately 60 percent of household/indoor air pollution deaths are due to cardiovascular diseases, including stroke and ischaemic heart disease. However, studies of the association between indoor air pollution and cardiovascular effects, indoor air quality improvement and cardiovascular health promotion, etc., are still limited. Moreover, the mechanism linking indoor air pollution to cardiovascular effects is still largely unclear. Therefore, we invite you to consider submitting your research for publication in this Special Issue of the journal, focusing on the “Impacts of Indoor Air Pollution on the Cardiopulmonary System”. The aim of this Special Issue is to communicate a selection of papers on measurement, prevention and interventions regarding cardiovascular effects induced by indoor air pollution in human subjects. In vitro and in vivo studies are also very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kai-Jen Chuang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • indoor air quality
  • indoor air pollution
  • household air pollution
  • particulate matter
  • ozone
  • carbon monoxide
  • carbon dioxide
  • nitrogen dioxide
  • volatile organic compounds
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • heart rate
  • blood pressure
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Impacts of In-Cabin Exposure to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matters and Carbon Monoxide on Changes in Heart Rate Variability for Healthy Public Transit Commuters
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 409; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070409
Received: 16 June 2019 / Revised: 12 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
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Abstract
To evaluate the cardiovascular impact of traffic-related pollutant exposure on healthy young adults, the research team has collected the primary data of in-cabin exposure to air pollutants and heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty young healthy college students were recruited in Taipei metropolitan area. [...] Read more.
To evaluate the cardiovascular impact of traffic-related pollutant exposure on healthy young adults, the research team has collected the primary data of in-cabin exposure to air pollutants and heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty young healthy college students were recruited in Taipei metropolitan area. In addition to electrocardiogram, personal exposure to air pollutants, i.e., particulate matter (PM) and carbon monoxide (CO), and weather conditions, including temperature and relative humidity (RH), on campus, bus, and mass rapid transit were monitored continuously. The following HRV parameters were evaluated using generalized additive mixed model to adjust for personal and meteorological variables: heart rate (HR), the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals (r-MSSD), the standard deviation of all NN intervals (SDNN), the percentage of successive NN interval differences greater than 50 ms (pNN50), low-frequency power (LF), high-frequency power (HF), total power (TP), and LF/HF. They were assessed to find out the association between in-cabin exposure and HRV parameters. Compared with the HRV parameters measured on campus, the percent changes in r-MSSD, SDNN, pNN50+1, LF, HF, and TP decreased when the participants were in public transits. After adjusting for all locations, 5 min moving averages of PM2.5–10 and PM1 were significantly associated with the increase in the percent changes in HR and SDNN. Additionally, 5 min moving averages of PM2.5–10 exposure were significantly associated with the decrease in the percent change in HF, while it was significantly associated with the increase of the percent change in LF/HF. The reduction of the percent change in HR was also found to be significantly associated with 5 min CO moving averages. To conclude, current analyses have shown that size-fractionated PMs and CO exposure in public transits might lead to significant changes of HRV parameters for healthy young adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Indoor Air Pollution on Cardiopulmonary System)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Indoor and Outdoor Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds and Health Risk Assessment in Residents Living near an Optoelectronics Industrial Park
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070380
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 30 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 July 2019 / Published: 8 July 2019
PDF Full-text (626 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to determine indoor and outdoor levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and to assess potential risks among residents living in the vicinity of an optoelectronics industrial park in 2006–2007. We used steel canisters to collect 72 indoor samples and 80 [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine indoor and outdoor levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and to assess potential risks among residents living in the vicinity of an optoelectronics industrial park in 2006–2007. We used steel canisters to collect 72 indoor samples and 80 outdoor samples over 24 h. Gas chromatography with a mass-selective detector was used for qualitative and quantitative analyses. The amounts of time residents spent doing activities in different microenvironments were determined by the self-administered questionnaire. The chronic hazard index (HIc) and cancer risk were applied to assess the non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks of VOCs among residents. Four VOCs of ethanol (indoor: 77.8 ± 92.8 μg/m3; outdoor: 26.8 ± 49.6 μg/m3), toluene (67.0 ± 36.7 μg/m3; 56.9 ± 19.0 μg/m3), m/p-xylene (50.8 ± 66.1 μg/m3; 21.2 ± 20.3 μg/m3), and acetone (37.7 ± 27.5 μg/m3; 25.8 ± 9.8 μg/m3) were identified as dominant components in both the indoor and outdoor environments. Total VOCs and six VOCs of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/p-xylene, o-xylene, and ethanol in indoor sites were significantly higher than those in outdoor sites (all p-values < 0.05). All estimated HIc values were less than unity and the cancer risk of benzene exposure was 1.8 × 10−4 (range: 9.3 × 10−5 to 3.4 × 10−4) based on resident time-weighted patterns. Strategies to reduce benzene exposure should be implemented to protect public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Indoor Air Pollution on Cardiopulmonary System)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 

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