Special Issue "Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Gloria Titos

Department of Applied Physics, Atmospheric Physics Group, University of Granada, Avda. del Hospicio, 18071 Granada, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: atmospheric aerosols; aerosol-cloud interactions; aerosol physical and optical properties; aerosol chemical composition; aerosol hygroscopicity; radiative forcing; aerosol in-situ techniques
Guest Editor
Dr. Alberto Cazorla

Department of Applied Physics, Atmospheric Physics Group, University of Granada, Avda. del Hospicio, 18071 Granada, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: atmospheric aerosols; aerosol-cloud interactions; aerosol characterization; bioaerosol; aerosol remote sensing and in-situ techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aerosols play an important role in the radiative balance of the Earth climate system. The direct aerosol effects depend on the aerosol optical properties and their spatial and vertical distribution in the atmosphere. In spite of the recent advances in instrumentation that have improved the characterization of key aerosol properties and increased the spatial resolution, aerosol-associated uncertainties are still considered to be a major factor in climate forcing. Additionally, understanding the physicochemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol particles in a range of atmospheric environments (from urban to regional) is crucial for understanding and constraining the climatic impacts of aerosols on a global scale.

This Special Issue aims to gather both experimental and model contributions on the characterization of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosol, with a special focus on regional and global climate impacts. We invite submissions exploring the following topics: Results from global monitoring networks, long-term datasets on aerosol chemistry and optical properties variability and trends, global models-measurements comparisons, satellite measurements, and in-situ vertical characterization (from airborne platforms such as aircrafts or balloons). This list is not exhaustive and all relevant research will be considered. Contributions presenting and describing new monitoring networks and measurement protocols are also welcome.

Dr. Gloria Titos
Dr. Alberto Cazorla
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Aerosol properties
  • Radiative forcing
  • Spatial variability
  • Long-term trends
  • Vertical distribution
  • Monitoring networks

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Web Application for Atmospheric Aerosol Data Management: Software and Case Study in the Spanish Network on Environmental Differential Mobility Analysers
Atmosphere 2019, 10(5), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10050279
Received: 25 March 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 17 May 2019
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Abstract
SCALA© (Sampling Campaigns for Aerosols in the Low Atmosphere) is a web-based software system that was developed in a multidisciplinary manner to integrally support the documentation and the management and analysis of atmospheric aerosol data from sampling campaigns. The software development process applied [...] Read more.
SCALA© (Sampling Campaigns for Aerosols in the Low Atmosphere) is a web-based software system that was developed in a multidisciplinary manner to integrally support the documentation and the management and analysis of atmospheric aerosol data from sampling campaigns. The software development process applied considered the prototyping and the evolutionary approaches. The software product (SCALA©) allows for the comprehensive management of the sampling campaigns’ life cycle (management of the profiles and processes involved in the start-up, development and closure of a campaign) and provides support for both intra- and inter-campaigns data analysis. The pilot deployment of SCALA© considers the Spanish Network on Environmental Differential Mobility Analysers (DMAs) (REDMAAS) and the PROACLIM project. This research project involves, among other objectives, the study of temporal and spatial variations of the atmospheric aerosol through a set of microphysical properties (size distribution, optical properties, hygroscopicity, etc.) measured in several locations in Spain. The main conclusions regarding size distribution are presented in this work. These have been have been extracted through SCALA© from the data collected in the REDMAAS 2015 and 2019 intercomparison campaigns and two years (2015 and 2016) of measurements with two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS) at CIEMAT (Madrid, central Spain) and UDC (A Coruña, NW of Spain) sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of JAXA Himawari-8-AHI Level-3 Aerosol Products over Eastern China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(4), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10040215
Received: 23 February 2019 / Revised: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
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Abstract
A novel geostationary satellite, the H8/AHI (Himawari-8/Advanced Himawari Imager), greatly improved the scan times per day covering East Asia, and the operational products have been stably provided for a period of time. Currently, atmospheric aerosol pollution is a major concern in China. H8/AHI [...] Read more.
A novel geostationary satellite, the H8/AHI (Himawari-8/Advanced Himawari Imager), greatly improved the scan times per day covering East Asia, and the operational products have been stably provided for a period of time. Currently, atmospheric aerosol pollution is a major concern in China. H8/AHI aerosol products with a high temporal resolution are helpful for real-time monitoring of subtle aerosol variation. However, the H8/AHI aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product has been updated three times since its launch, and the evaluation of this dataset is currently rare. In order to validate its accuracy, this study compared the H8/AHI Level-3 (L3) hourly AOT products of all versions with measurements obtained from eleven sunphotometer sites located in eastern China from 2015 to 2018. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 AOT products from the same period were also used for inter-comparison. Although the H8/AHI AOT retrievals in version 010 show a moderate agreement with ground-based observations (correlation coefficient (R): 0.66–0.85), and the time series analysis shows that it can effectively monitor hourly variation, it suffers from an obvious underestimation of 0.3 compared to ground-based and MODIS observations. After the retrieval algorithm updated the predefined aerosol model, the overall underestimation of AHI AOTs was solved (version 010 slope: 0.43–0.62, version 030 slope: 0.75–1.02), and the AOTs in version 030 show a high agreement with observations from ten sites (R: 0.73–0.91). In addition, the surface reflectance dataset derived from the minimum reflectivity model in version 010 is inaccurate in parts of eastern China, for both “bright” and “dark” land surfaces, which leads to the overestimation of the AOT values under low aerosol loads at the Beijing and Xianghe sites. After the update of the surface dataset in version 030, this phenomenon was alleviated, resulting in no significant difference in scatterplots under different surface conditions. The AOTs of H8/AHI version 030 show a significant improvement compared to the previous two versions, but the spatial distribution of AHI is still different from MODIS AOT products due to the differences in sensors and algorithms. Therefore, although the evaluation in this study demonstrates the effectiveness of H8/AHI AOT products for aerosol monitoring at fine temporal resolutions, the performance of H8/AHI AOT products needs further study by considering more conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Inferring Fine-Mode and Coarse-Mode Aerosol Complex Refractive Indices from AERONET Inversion Products over China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(3), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10030158
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
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Abstract
Detailed knowledge of the complex refractive indices (m) of fine- and coarse-mode aerosols is important for enhancing understanding of the effect of atmospheric aerosol on climate. However, studies on obtaining aerosol modal m values are particularly scarce. This study proposes a [...] Read more.
Detailed knowledge of the complex refractive indices (m) of fine- and coarse-mode aerosols is important for enhancing understanding of the effect of atmospheric aerosol on climate. However, studies on obtaining aerosol modal m values are particularly scarce. This study proposes a method for inferring m values of fine- and coarse-mode aerosol using the inversion products from the AERONET ground-based aerosol robotic network. By identifying the aerosol type, modal m values are constrained and then inferred based on a maximum likelihood method. Numerical tests showed that compared with the reference values, our method slightly overestimates the real parts of the refractive indices (n), but underestimates the imaginary parts (k) by 2.11% ± 11.59% and 8.4% ± 26.42% for fine and coarse modes, respectively. We applied this method to 21 AERONET sites around China, which yielded annual mean m values of (1.45 ± 0.04) + (0.0109 ± 0.0046)i and (1.53 ± 0.01) + (0.0039 ± 0.0011)i for fine- and coarse-mode aerosols, respectively. It is observed that the fine mode n decreased from 1.53 to 1.39 with increasing latitude, while fine mode k values were generally larger than 0.008 over most of China. The coarse-mode n and k ranged from 1.52 to 1.56 and from 0.002 to 0.006, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Characteristics and Sources of Water-Soluble Ions in PM2.5 in the Sichuan Basin, China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020078
Received: 19 January 2019 / Revised: 4 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2429 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
To track the particulate pollution in Sichuan Basin, sample filters were collected in three urban sites. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) were explored and their sources were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). During 2012–2013, the PM2.5 concentrations were 86.7 ± [...] Read more.
To track the particulate pollution in Sichuan Basin, sample filters were collected in three urban sites. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) were explored and their sources were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). During 2012–2013, the PM2.5 concentrations were 86.7 ± 49.7 μg m−3 in Chengdu (CD), 78.6 ± 36.8 μg m−3 in Neijiang (NJ), and 71.7 ± 36.9 μg m−3 in Chongqing (CQ), respectively. WSIIs contributed about 50% to PM2.5, and 90% of them were secondary inorganic ions. NH4+ and NO3 roughly followed the seasonal pattern of PM2.5 variations, whereas the highest levels of SO42− appeared in summer and autumn. PM2.5 samples were most acidic in autumn and winter, but were alkaline in spring. The aerosol acidity increased with the increasing level of anion equivalents. SO42− primarily existed in the form of (NH4)2SO4. Full neutralization of NH4+ to NO3 was only observed in low levels of SO42− + NO3, and NO3 existed in various forms. SO42− and NO3 were formed mainly through homogeneous reactions, and there was the existence of heterogeneous reactions under high relative humidity. The main identified sources of WSIIs included coal combustion, biomass burning, and construction dust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Occurrence and Reverse Transport of Severe Dust Storms Associated with Synoptic Weather in East Asia
Atmosphere 2019, 10(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10010004
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6928 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The range and time of the environmental effects of Asian dust are closely dependent on the pathways and the speed of dust plume movement. In this study, the occurrence and movement of two dust storms in China in May 2017 were examined by [...] Read more.
The range and time of the environmental effects of Asian dust are closely dependent on the pathways and the speed of dust plume movement. In this study, the occurrence and movement of two dust storms in China in May 2017 were examined by using open space- and ground-based measurement data and the backward trajectories of dust plumes. Results from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data showed that the dust storms were caused by the rapid coupling development of Mongolian cyclones and Asian highs. After the dust plumes arrived at the Southeastern China in the first dust event, the stable weather conditions and the Asian high slowed down the movement of the plumes, leading to the gradual diffusion of dust particles. Moreover, the Asian high in the first event and the Huabei low (a low-pressure system in North China Plain) in the second altered the movement direction of the dust plumes from southward to northward, which we denote as the “dust reverse transport (DRT)”. The DRT occurred only within the lower troposphere even though dust plumes could extended to 5–10 km in vertical direction. Statistical results of 28 spring dust events occurred in 2015–2018 showed that all these dust storms were triggered by Mongolian cyclones and/or Asian highs, and approximately 39% moved as the DRT, indicating about one third of severe spring dust storms could influence larger areas or longer time than the remained ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Regional Monitoring)
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