Special Issue "Aerosol Radiative Effects"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Tero Mielonen Website E-Mail
Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio, Finland
Interests: global and regional modeling of atmospheric aerosols and their radiative effects; aerosol remote sensing; aerosol–cloud interactions; biogenic aerosols; aerosol optical properties; air quality
Guest Editor
Prof. Antti Arola Website E-Mail
Finnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio, Finland
Interests: remote sensing of aerosols and clouds; radiative effects of aerosols and clouds; aerosol optical properties; atmospheric solar radiation; atmospheric UV radiation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Even though atmospheric aerosols have been studied extensively, their radiative effects, both direct and indirect, form the largest source of uncertainty in the estimates of the Earth’s changing energy budget. Despite their small mass/volume fraction, aerosol particles have a significant impact on radiative transfer, thus affecting the weather and climate. Atmospheric aerosols interact with the solar radiation through scattering and absorption and, to a lesser extent, with the terrestrial radiation through absorption, scattering, and emission. Furthermore, aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei upon which cloud droplets and ice crystals form. Consequently, the role of aerosols in the atmosphere is versatile, and aerosols from anthropogenic sources dominate the uncertainty in the total anthropogenic radiative forcing.

Our confidence in the scientific understanding of aerosol–radiation interactions and aerosol–cloud interactions is still medium at the best. Thus, the range of uncertainty regarding these interactions needs to be reduced significantly to improve our understanding of climate change. Therefore, new and insightful studies based on observations and modeling are needed to better constrain the uncertainties concerning the radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols. Manuscripts on all these aspects are welcome for this Special Issue.

Dr. Tero Mielonen
Prof. Antti Arola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • atmospheric aerosols
  • aerosol–radiation interactions
  • aerosol–cloud interactions, aerosol chemical and physical properties
  • aerosol measurements, remote sensing and modeling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Anthropogenic Aerosol Climate Effects among Three Climate Models with Reduced Complexity
Atmosphere 2019, 10(8), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10080456 - 09 Aug 2019
Abstract
The same prescribed anthropogenic aerosol forcing was implemented into three climate models. The atmosphere components of these participating climate models were the GAMIL, ECHAM, and CAM models. Ensemble simulations were carried out to obtain a reliable estimate of anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing [...] Read more.
The same prescribed anthropogenic aerosol forcing was implemented into three climate models. The atmosphere components of these participating climate models were the GAMIL, ECHAM, and CAM models. Ensemble simulations were carried out to obtain a reliable estimate of anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing (ERF). The ensemble mean ERFs from these three participating models with this aerosol forcing were −0.27, −0.63, and −0.54 W∙m−2. The model diversity in ERF is clearly reduced as compared with those based on the models’ own default approaches (−1.98, −0.21, and −2.22 W∙m−2). This is consistent with the design of this aerosol forcing. The modeled ERF can be decomposed into two basic components, i.e., the instantaneous radiative forcing (RF) from aerosol–radiation interactions (RFari) and the aerosol-induced changes in cloud forcing (△Fcloud*). For the three participating models, the model diversity in RFari (−0.21, −0.33, and −0.29 W∙m−2) could be constrained by reducing the differences in natural aerosol radiative forcings. However, it was difficult to figure out the reason for the model diversity in △Fcloud* (−0.05, −0.28, and −0.24 W∙m−2), which was the dominant source of the model diversity in ERF. The variability of modeled ERF was also studied. Ensemble simulations showed that the modeled RFs were very stable. The rapid adjustments (ERF − RF) had an important role to play in the quantification of the perturbation of ERF. Fortunately, the contribution from the rapid adjustments to the mean ERF was very small. This study also showed that we should pay attention to the difference between the aerosol climate effects we want and the aerosol climate effects we calculate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aerosol Radiative Effects)
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