Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land–Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 4065

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. College of Geography and Environmental Science, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158, China
2. Institute of Scientific and Technical Information, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Haikou 571101, China
Interests: tropical climate change; agricultural remote sensing; land use/cover change; remote sensing of resources and environment; geographic information system

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Guest Editor
College of Geography and Environmental Science, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158, China
Interests: physical geography; environmental geochemistry; tourism resource development and planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, global warming is one of the leading areas of earth science research, and it is also a serious issue of international concern. The pan-tropical zone is one of the regions most severely affected by global warming, and it plays an important role in global climate patterns. Tropical agriculture is an important component of global agriculture, providing the economic foundations on which many people in the pan-tropical regions base their livelihoods. Understanding the interactions between climate change and tropical agriculture in the pan-tropical zone is crucial to the prediction of future climate change and the formulation of effective strategies to adapt tropical agriculture to overcome climatic changes. The focus of this Special Issue is agriculture–climate interactions that occur in the tropical regions that are vulnerable to global warming.

This Special Issue’s scope covers a wide range of topics. Original research, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and model studies related to the theme of agriculture–climate interaction are welcome. Example topics include, but are not limited to, the following subjects:

  • The spatio-temporal characteristics of tropical agricultural climate resources;
  • Observation and modeling of climate change in tropical regions;
  • Extreme climate events that occur in tropical areas;
  • The impact on and adaptation, and vulnerability of tropical agroforestry to climate change;
  • Climate smart agriculture in tropical zones.

Contributions related to the greenhouse gas emissions originating from tropical agriculture and the agro-meteorological modeling of tropical crops are also welcome.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for researchers to share their latest discoveries and innovative methods related to the study of agriculture–climate interactions in tropical regions. This Special Issue aims to promote interdisciplinary research by combining observations, modeling, and theoretical understandings of agriculture–climate interactions to deepen our understanding of these complex interactions between the climate and their impact on global climate change, as well as to promote recognition of the importance of pan-tropical regions regarding global climate change among policymakers and stakeholders.

We very much look forward to receiving your submission proposals.

Best regards,

Dr. Shengpei Dai
Prof. Dr. Zhizhong Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • tropical agricultural climate resources
  • extreme climate events
  • impact, adaptation, and vulnerability of climate change
  • climate smart agriculture
  • agricultural greenhouse gas emissions
  • agro-meteorological model

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 11891 KiB  
Article
Identification of Actual Irrigated Areas in Tropical Regions Based on Remote Sensing Evapotranspiration
by Haowei Xu, Hao Duan, Qiuju Li and Chengxin Han
Atmosphere 2024, 15(4), 492; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15040492 - 16 Apr 2024
Viewed by 559
Abstract
Amidst global climate change and unsustainable human exploitation of water resources, water has emerged as a critical factor constraining global agricultural food production and ecological environments. Particularly in agricultural powerhouses like China, irrigation water accounts for a significant portion of freshwater resource utilization. [...] Read more.
Amidst global climate change and unsustainable human exploitation of water resources, water has emerged as a critical factor constraining global agricultural food production and ecological environments. Particularly in agricultural powerhouses like China, irrigation water accounts for a significant portion of freshwater resource utilization. However, the inefficiency of irrigation water usage has become a weak link in water resource management. To better assess irrigation water efficiency, an accurate estimation of regional irrigated areas is urgently needed. This study proposes a method for identifying actual irrigated areas based on remote sensing-derived evapotranspiration (ET) to address the challenge of accurately interpreting irrigated areas in tropical regions. Using Yunnan Province’s Yuanmou irrigation district as a case study, this research combined ground monitoring data and remote sensing data to identify actual irrigated areas through ET inversion and downscaling methods using the Penman–Monteith–Leuning (PML) model. In 2023, the total irrigated area interpreted from remote sensing in the study area was approximately 15,000 hm2, with a comparison against validation points revealing an extraction error of 16%. The small error indicates that this method can effectively enhance the reliability of monitoring actual irrigated areas, thus providing valuable data support for agricultural irrigation water management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions)
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12 pages, 9322 KiB  
Article
Coupled Calculation of Soil Moisture Content and PML Model Based on Data Assimilation in the Hetao Irrigation District
by Hao Duan, Qiuju Li, Haowei Xu and Liqi Cao
Atmosphere 2024, 15(3), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15030340 - 10 Mar 2024
Viewed by 702
Abstract
Most Penman-Monteith-Leuning (PML) evapotranspiration (ET) modeling studies are dominated by consideration of meteorological, energy, and land use information, etc., but the dynamic coupling of soil moisture content (SM), especially in terms of improving accuracy through assimilation, lacks sufficient attention. This paper proposes a [...] Read more.
Most Penman-Monteith-Leuning (PML) evapotranspiration (ET) modeling studies are dominated by consideration of meteorological, energy, and land use information, etc., but the dynamic coupling of soil moisture content (SM), especially in terms of improving accuracy through assimilation, lacks sufficient attention. This paper proposes a research framework for the dynamic coupling simulation of PML model and SM based on data assimilation, i.e., the remote sensing monitored SM is combined with soil evaporation of PML to obtain high-precision time-continuous SM data through data assimilation; simultaneously, dynamical soil evaporation coefficients are generated based on the assimilated SM to improve the simulation accuracy of the PML model. The new scheme was validated at a typical irrigation zone in north China and showed obvious improvements in both SM and ET simulations. Moreover, the effect of the assimilation of SM on the simulation accuracy of ET for different crop growth periods is further analyzed. This research provides a new idea for the coupling simulation of the SM and PML models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions)
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13 pages, 4308 KiB  
Article
Climate Change Facilitates the Potentially Suitable Habitats of the Invasive Crop Insect Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller)
by Changqing Liu, Ming Yang, Ming Li, Zhenan Jin, Nianwan Yang, Hao Yu and Wanxue Liu
Atmosphere 2024, 15(1), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15010119 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 815
Abstract
Invasive alien insects directly or indirectly driven by climate change threaten crop production and increase economic costs worldwide. Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller) is a highly reproductive invasive crop insect that can severely damage fruit commodities and cause significant economic losses globally. Estimating the global [...] Read more.
Invasive alien insects directly or indirectly driven by climate change threaten crop production and increase economic costs worldwide. Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller) is a highly reproductive invasive crop insect that can severely damage fruit commodities and cause significant economic losses globally. Estimating the global potentially suitable habitats (PSH) of E. ceratoniae is an important aspect of its invasive risk assessment and early warning. Here, we constructed an optimized MaxEnt model based on the global distribution records of E. ceratoniae, and nine environmental variables (EVs), to predict its global PSH under current and future climates. Our results showed that the RM value was 2.0 and the mean area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value was 0.972, indicating the high accuracy of the optimal MaxEnt model. The mean temperature of driest quarter (bio9, 50.2%), mean temperature of wettest quarter (bio8, 16.9%), temperature seasonality (bio4, 9.7%), and precipitation of coldest quarter (bio19, 9.1%) were the significant EVs affecting its distribution patterns. The global PSH of E. ceratoniae are mainly located in western Asia under current climate scenarios (687.57 × 104 km2), which showed an increasing trend under future climate scenarios. The PSH of E. ceratoniae achieved the maximum under the shared socioeconomic pathway (SSP) 1–2.6 in the 2030s and under the SSP2-4.5 in the 2050s. The increased PSH of E. ceratoniae are mainly located in southwestern Asia, northwestern Europe, northwestern South America, northwestern North America, southern Oceania, and northwestern Africa. Our findings suggest that quarantine officials and governmental departments in the above high-risk invasion areas should strengthen monitoring and early warning to control E. ceratoniae; in particular, cultural measures should be taken in areas where its further expansion is expected in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions)
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18 pages, 9281 KiB  
Article
Calibration of the Ångström–Prescott Model for Accurately Estimating Solar Radiation Spatial Distribution in Areas with Few Global Solar Radiation Stations: A Case Study of the China Tropical Zone
by Xuan Yu, Xia Yi, Mao-Fen Li, Shengpei Dai, Hailiang Li, Hongxia Luo, Qian Zheng and Yingying Hu
Atmosphere 2023, 14(12), 1825; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14121825 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 815
Abstract
The Ångström–Prescott formula is commonly used in climatological calculation methods of solar radiation simulation. Aiming at the characteristics of a vast area, few meteorological stations, and uneven distribution in the tropical regions of China, in order to obtain the optimal parameters of the [...] Read more.
The Ångström–Prescott formula is commonly used in climatological calculation methods of solar radiation simulation. Aiming at the characteristics of a vast area, few meteorological stations, and uneven distribution in the tropical regions of China, in order to obtain the optimal parameters of the global solar radiation calculation model, this study proposes a suitable monthly global solar radiation model based on the single-station approach and the between-groups linkage of the A–P model, which utilizes monthly measured meteorological data from 80 meteorological stations spanning the period from 1996 to 2016 in the tropical zone of China, considering the similarity in changes of monthly sunshine percentage between stations. The applicability and accuracy of the correction parameters (a and b coefficients) were tested and evaluated, and then the modified parameters were extended to conventional meteorological stations through Thiessen polygons. Finally, the spatial distribution of solar radiation in the tropical region of China was simulated by kriging, IDW, and spline interpolation techniques. The results show the following: (1) The single-station model exhibited the highest accuracy in simulating the average annual global solar radiation, followed by the model based on the between-groups linkage. After optimizing the a and b coefficients, the simulation accuracy of the average annual global solar radiation increased by 5.3%, 8.1%, and 4.4% for the whole year, dry season, and wet season, respectively. (2) Through cross-validation, the most suitable spatial interpolation methods for the whole year, dry season, and wet season in the tropical zone of China were IDW, Kriging, and Spline, respectively. This research has positive implications for improving the accuracy of solar radiation prediction and guiding regional agricultural production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions)
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Review

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13 pages, 2627 KiB  
Review
Agricultural Disaster Prevention System: Insights from Taiwan’s Adaptation Strategies
by Ming-Hwi Yao, Yung-Heng Hsu, Ting-Yi Li, Yung-Ming Chen, Chun-Tang Lu, Chi-Ling Chen and Pei-Yu Shih
Atmosphere 2024, 15(5), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15050526 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 530
Abstract
In response to the adverse effects of climate change-induced frequent extreme disasters on agricultural production and supply stability, this study develops a comprehensive agricultural disaster prevention system based on current adaptation strategies for mitigating agricultural meteorological disasters. The primary goal is to enhance [...] Read more.
In response to the adverse effects of climate change-induced frequent extreme disasters on agricultural production and supply stability, this study develops a comprehensive agricultural disaster prevention system based on current adaptation strategies for mitigating agricultural meteorological disasters. The primary goal is to enhance disaster preparedness and recovery through three core platforms: a fine-scale weather forecast service system, a crop disaster early warning system, and an agricultural information service platform for disasters. The results show that every major agricultural production township in Taiwan now has dedicated agricultural weather stations and access to refined weather forecasts. Additionally, a disaster prevention calendar for 76 important crops is established, integrating cultivation management practices and critical disaster thresholds for different growth periods. Utilizing this calendar, the crop disaster early warning system can provide timely disaster-related information and pre-disaster prevention assistance to farmers through various information dissemination tools. As a disaster approaches, the agricultural information service platform for disasters provides updates on current crop growth conditions. This service not only pinpoints areas at higher risk of disasters and vulnerable crop types but also offers mitigation suggestions to prevent potential damage. Administrative efficiency is then improved with a response mechanism incorporating drones and image analysis for early disaster detection and rapid response. In summary, the collaborative efforts outlined in this study demonstrate a proactive approach to agricultural disaster prevention. By leveraging technological advancements and interdisciplinary cooperation, the aim is to safeguard agricultural livelihoods and ensure food security in the face of climate-induced challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agriculture-Climate Interactions in Tropical Regions)
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