Special Issue "Solar Applications in the Public Space"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 7380

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Teresa Santos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences (CICS.NOVA), Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: urban sustainability; environmental Indicators; solar potential; green planning; quality of Life
Prof. Dr. Killian Lobato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Dom Luiz, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: operation and maintenance of photovoltaic systems; solar resource in complex urban environments
Prof. Dr. Jorge Rocha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: geosimulation; geocomputation; artificial neural networks; graphs theory; cellular automata; multi-agent systems; urban morphology; remote sensing; epidemiology; health geography; geomarketing; tourism; smart cities; big data
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solar mapping in the urban environment is generally focused in quantifying rooftop or facade potential. However, installing photovoltaic-based applications in public open spaces, has distinct requirements to rooftop PV systems that are not generally considered. We can anticipate that soon areas now reserved to cars will be gradually replaced by new revigorated public spaces where innovative smart urban furniture will be a common presence. Such urban solutions, from charging stations to information stands, intelligent waste bins or smart lightning, among others, can benefit from solar power.

In this Special Issue we are interested in novel approaches, methods and tools for assessing the potential of solar energy in the public space, using remote sensing and geographical modelling. Topics of interest include: 1) methods to measure solar resources in the public space; 2) sizing PV-based street furniture in shared urban areas; 3) quantifying the influence of the built environment in solar availability; and 4) other relevant applications in urban solar modelling.

Dr. Teresa Santos
Prof. Dr. Killian Lobato
Prof. Dr. Jorge Rocha
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Analysis of Height-to-Width Ratio of Commercial Streets with Arcades Based on Sunshine Hours and Street Orientation
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(4), 1706; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041706 - 14 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1497
Abstract
By extracting and simplifying the characteristics of commercial streets with arcades (Qilou) in Nanning, the tissue map of Qilou streets which reflects the urban morphology, including the road network form, block scale, building scale and other characteristics in a hot and humid area [...] Read more.
By extracting and simplifying the characteristics of commercial streets with arcades (Qilou) in Nanning, the tissue map of Qilou streets which reflects the urban morphology, including the road network form, block scale, building scale and other characteristics in a hot and humid area is obtained. In addition, the sunshine simulation is performed by using sunshine design software in an environment comprising streets with arcades to simulate street sunlight environments under various conditions. The relationship among street height-to-width ratio, sunshine hours, and street orientation angle is achieved by nonlinear fitting analysis. Then, a model is established to adjust the street height-to-width ratio based on sunshine requirement and street orientation. The finding indicated that when the street is north–south, it is suggested that the street height-to-width ratio is 0.95–1.13 to reduce sunshine hours effectively, and when the street is east–west, it is proposed that one side of the street should have a recessed space to improve the thermal conditions. The results of this study can serve as the specific guidelines that can be adopted in the redesign and reformation of commercial streets with arcades to achieve thermal comfort of Qilou streets in hot and humid areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Applications in the Public Space)
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Article
Modeling Photovoltaic Potential for Bus Shelters on a City-Scale: A Case Study in Lisbon
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 4801; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10144801 - 13 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2708
Abstract
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development set 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These include ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all (SGD7) and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (SGD11). Thus, across the globe, major [...] Read more.
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development set 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These include ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all (SGD7) and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (SGD11). Thus, across the globe, major cities are moving in the smart city direction, by, for example, incorporating photovoltaics (PV), electric buses and sensors to improve public transportation. We study the concept of integrated PV bus stop shelters for the city of Lisbon. We identified the suitable locations for these, with respect to solar exposure, by using a Geographic Information System (GIS) solar radiation map. Then, using proxies to describe tourist and commuter demand, we determined that 54% of all current city bus stop shelters have the potential to receive PV-based solutions. Promoting innovative solutions such as this one will support smart mobility and urban sustainability while increasing quality of life, the ultimate goal of the Smart Cities movement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Applications in the Public Space)
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Article
Surface Radiation Balance of Urban Materials and Their Impact on Air Temperature of an Urban Canyon in Lisbon, Portugal
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(6), 2193; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10062193 - 24 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2747
Abstract
Urban climate results from the modifications caused by the characteristics of cities, which modifies the regional climatic conditions of a city. When urban areas are warmer than the surrounding areas, the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon occurs. Being a major phenomenon and a [...] Read more.
Urban climate results from the modifications caused by the characteristics of cities, which modifies the regional climatic conditions of a city. When urban areas are warmer than the surrounding areas, the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon occurs. Being a major phenomenon and a global topic of interest for all affected cities, there are already numerous studies that address this subject. However, most studies are only focused on the macro and mesoscales. This study looks at the micrometeorological scale in a neighborhood of Lisbon (Telheiras). Having as a main objective to evaluate how the radiation balance of urban materials influences air temperature in an urban canyon, thermal images of different urban materials were obtained using infrared thermography, a technique that allowed understanding how the temperatures registered in the facades and other urban surfaces can affect the air temperature of the urban canyon. The components of the radiation budget were obtained by using a pyranometer and a pyrgeometer. Moreover, a microclimatic network to monitor air temperature and relative humidity was installed in the study area. The results show that, when the streets are less exposed to the prevailing wind direction in Lisbon (north and northwest), air temperatures are slightly higher than those found in opposite conditions. Both the temperature and the radiative balance of the facades and other surfaces (asphalt, light Portuguese sidewalk, and tile floor) respond directly to incident solar radiation. As expected, it was found that south facades have the highest temperatures of the four exposures under study (>4 °C when compared to the opposite facade), and the highest radiative balance was always registered on asphalt when compared to the sidewalk (at 9:00 a.m. + 30 W∙m−2, at 1:00 p.m. + 149 W∙m−2, and at 7:00 p.m. + 66 W∙m−2). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Applications in the Public Space)
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