Special Issue "Smart Cities and Internet of Things (IoT)"

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jorge Rocha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, Universidade de Lisboa
Interests: Complex systems, Geographical modelling, remote sensing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, Smart Cities are one of the big issues concerning the urban strategies of most governments around the world, especially in more developed countries, which, in recent years, have faced rapid urban growth. From a technical point of view, the Smart City model considers a city as a complex system made up of citizens, resources and services. The status of each service is monitored through a layer of sensors, which send the captured data through the appropriate communication network to an analysis platform.

Complex adaptive systems are characterized by the presence of components that learn through interaction. This is a useful metaphor for the potential of smart city systems. In smart cities, order is needed for planners to channel technological capabilities productively, while chaos provides a dynamic and flexible space for business and social innovation to breathe.

The emergence of the concept of the Smart City is strictly linked to the idea of digital city, due to the similarity of the two designations. Conceptually, smart cities represent a model of urban development, whose main function is based on the effort to capitalize on the new information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Smart Cities moved then into the mainstream as governments (including the European Union) commit sizeable funding and policy to Smart City development, through deployments of Smart City protocols and operating platforms and acceptance of smart technologies as the norm in transport, energy, development, assisted living and security. The purpose of the Smart Cities passes through ensure prosperity, competitiveness, efficiency and sustainability in various socio-economic levels.

Dr. Jorge Rocha
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smart Cities
  • Sustainability
  • Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Big Data
  • Data Mining
  • Machine Learning
  • Sensors
  • Social Networks
  • Complex Systems
  • Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI)
  • Data Analytics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Proposal and Application of Bluetooth Mesh Profile for Smart Cities’ Services
Smart Cities 2019, 2(1), 1-19; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities2010001 - 26 Dec 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
‘Smart cities’ is a concept that embraces many technologies and solutions in sensing and carrying a city’s data through a network for further processing and analysis. Smart cities’ main priority is citizens and environmental sustainability. In practice, wireless sensors networks over mesh networks [...] Read more.
‘Smart cities’ is a concept that embraces many technologies and solutions in sensing and carrying a city’s data through a network for further processing and analysis. Smart cities’ main priority is citizens and environmental sustainability. In practice, wireless sensors networks over mesh networks are the approach employed most of the time. In terms of wireless communications technologies, Bluetooth low energy offers a robust, low cost, and low power consumption option. The recently published Bluetooth mesh profile specification addresses the most relevant challenges on that paradigm, adding secure multicast communications capabilities. A framework to create Smart Cities services was proposed and a traffic light service was used to demonstrate specification applicability for smart cities’ services. The proposed service showed that data may be collected and shared between devices in a mesh network through and over a metropolitan area. The specification’s strengths were demonstrated and some topics for further development were identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Internet of Things (IoT))
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Open AccessArticle
Digital Systems in Smart City and Infrastructure: Digital as a Service
Smart Cities 2018, 1(1), 134-154; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities1010008 - 06 Nov 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Digitalization has enabled infrastructure and cities to be “smarter”; the use of physical space and energy, the transmission of information, the management of users, assets and processes, the operation of businesses and companies have been progressively digitalized. The main challenges of a Smart [...] Read more.
Digitalization has enabled infrastructure and cities to be “smarter”; the use of physical space and energy, the transmission of information, the management of users, assets and processes, the operation of businesses and companies have been progressively digitalized. The main challenges of a Smart City is its definition, scope and interconnections; there are different approaches to Smart City implementations that vary from collaborative multidisciplinary environments, the addition of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) within its physical fabric to the use of Big Data for higher abstraction decisions. This paper presents the concept of Digital as a Service (DaaS), where any complete digitalization can be implemented independently of its associated physical infrastructure in a Cloud environment; DasS would enable an interoperable Virtual Digital Infrastructure (VDI). In addition, this paper reviews the current Digital Systems, Transmission Networks, Servers and Management Systems. The next Industrial Revolution will be founded on Artificial Intelligence that will entirely replace humans by taking production and management decisions based on the Internet of Things (IoT), the Cloud, BlockChain, Big Data, Virtual Reality and the combination of digital and real infrastructure or city. Digital as a Service would be its enabler by providing the entire interconnection, integration and virtualization of its Space, Services and Structure (3S). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Internet of Things (IoT))
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ethics and Law in the Internet of Things World
Smart Cities 2018, 1(1), 98-120; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities1010006 - 12 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The aim of the law is to maintain social order, peace, and justice in society, whereas the aim of ethics is to provide codes of ethics and conduct that help people to decide what is wrong, and how to act and behave. Laws [...] Read more.
The aim of the law is to maintain social order, peace, and justice in society, whereas the aim of ethics is to provide codes of ethics and conduct that help people to decide what is wrong, and how to act and behave. Laws provide a minimum set of standards for obtaining good human behavior. Ethics often provides standards that exceed the legal minimum. Therefore, for the best behavior, both law and ethics should be respected. The Internet of Things (IoT) involves a large number of objects and humans that are connected via the Internet ‘anytime’ and ‘anyplace’ to provide homogeneous communication and contextual services. Thus, it creates a new social, economic, political, and ethical landscape that needs new enhanced legal and ethical measures for privacy protection, data security, ownership protection, trust improvement, and the development of proper standards. This survey and opinion article is concerned with the ethics and legislation of the IoT and provides an overview of the following: definition and history of the IoT; general ethical principles and theories that are available for application in the IoT; the role of governments in the IoT; regulations in the European Union (EU) and United States for the IoT’ IoT characteristics that have the potential to create ethical problems; IoT ethical questions and principles; IoT security, privacy, and trust aspects; and the ethical culture of IoT-related companies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Cities and Internet of Things (IoT))
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