Special Issue "Haptics: Technology and Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).
Due to the COVID-19 emergency, the submission deadline will be relaxed.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sang-Youn Kim
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Interaction Laboratory, Advanced Research Technology Center, Computer Science and Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Chungjeol-ro, Byeongcheon-myeon, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan, ChungNam 330-708, Korea
Interests: haptic rendering; tactile actuators; human–computer interaction; smart transducer; 3D object modeling; sensor; virtual reality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue seeks papers examining some of the latest advances with respect to haptic actuators, haptic rendering, haptic applications in virtual reality/augmented reality, haptic applications in virtual education/training, and all aspects of haptics, including neuroscience, psychophysics, perception, and interactions. This Special Issue also welcomes papers related to medical and surgical simulations, skills training, rehabilitation robotics, collaborative human–robot interactions, communication, and haptic feedback for design and the arts.

Prof. Dr. Sang-Youn Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • haptic/vibrotactile actuator
  • psychophysics and perception
  • multimodal interaction
  • virtual reality
  • haptic interfaces design
  • haptic rendering and modeling

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Vibrotactile Stimulation of Nail of Hallux during Walking: Effect on Center-of-Mass Movement in Healthy Young Adults
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4562; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134562 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Previous studies have reported that vibrotactile stimulation of the nail of the hallux decreases the variability of the center-of-mass (CoM) movement in the lateral direction in subjects performing unsteady walking on the spot. This study investigated the effect of vibrotactile stimulation of the [...] Read more.
Previous studies have reported that vibrotactile stimulation of the nail of the hallux decreases the variability of the center-of-mass (CoM) movement in the lateral direction in subjects performing unsteady walking on the spot. This study investigated the effect of vibrotactile stimulation of the nail of the hallux on the CoM movement during walking. Healthy young males were asked to walk with and without stimulation, and their CoM was measured. The intrasubject mean and coefficient of variation (CV) of their walking speed, stance time, and CoM movement were evaluated. The differences between the variables with and without stimulation were determined, and the baseline-dependent effects of the stimulation on these variables were analyzed. It was observed that stimulation had a negative baseline-dependent effect on the CVs of the walking speed, stance time, and the CoM movement in the lateral direction. In particular, stimulation decreased the CV of the CoM movement in the lateral direction for subjects with a greater variability. Vibrotactile stimulation of the nail of the hallux can reduce the variability of the lateral displacement of the CoM movement in healthy young subjects who otherwise show a large variability of the CoM movement during walking without stimulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haptics: Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Using Game Engines for Visuo-Haptic Learning Simulations
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4553; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134553 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Technological advances have been the main driver of enhancing human–computer interaction and interactive simulations have experienced exponential growth in recent years. However, visual and auditory channels are usually the only ones considered for educational simulations even though the sense of touch is also [...] Read more.
Technological advances have been the main driver of enhancing human–computer interaction and interactive simulations have experienced exponential growth in recent years. However, visual and auditory channels are usually the only ones considered for educational simulations even though the sense of touch is also an important one. Touch allows us to recognize and interact with our surroundings. A common way to develop a visuo-haptic simulation in the area of interactive systems is by using a graphic and physics-based engine orchestrated with a haptic rendering framework. However, new solutions, such as professional game engines, have enabled the development of high-quality applications in much shorter time. In this paper, a novel architecture for fast development of interactive visuo-haptic applications in game engines is discussed. To validate the proposed architecture, the Haptic Device Integration for Unity (HaDIU) plugin was implemented. Simulations were implemented to verify the operability of haptic devices. Each scenario was properly modelled and has different haptic objectives. Furthermore, to validate that the usage of this approach provides better visualizations than an existing single purpose application, an experimental study was performed. Results suggest that by using this approach faster development of interactive visuo-haptic simulators can be achieved than using traditional techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haptics: Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Measurement System for Finger Skin Displacement on a Textured Surface Using Index Matching
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 4184; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124184 - 18 Jun 2020
Abstract
Understanding the relationship between the displacement of the skin when tracing a textured object and the resulting subjective sensations is essential in designing tactile displays. Previous studies observed skin displacement using flat glass plates or uneven surfaces that do not optically interfere with [...] Read more.
Understanding the relationship between the displacement of the skin when tracing a textured object and the resulting subjective sensations is essential in designing tactile displays. Previous studies observed skin displacement using flat glass plates or uneven surfaces that do not optically interfere with finger surface observations. In contrast, no direct method for observing skin surface displacement on a texture exists. We propose a system that enables observation of the interaction between a textured surface and the skin of the finger using an index-matching technique. In the proposed system, a texture plate is immersed in oil having the same refractive index as the plate, and measurements are made when the interface is nearly optically transparent. Further, printed markers are attached to the skin of the finger, and their movements analyzed using an image-processing algorithm. The system enables spatial measurement of the skin shear and the vibration of the contact area. Evaluation experiments conducted on a 1D textured surface having a pitch of 0.6 mm verify the feasibility of the proposed system. Optical misalignment simulation results indicate that the system is slightly less accurate than type-I mechanoreceptors but can measure skin deformation on a texture and also observe it spatially and temporally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haptics: Technology and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Measurement of the Permissible Range of Consistency between Visual and Tactile Presentations of Line Grating Textures
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2494; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072494 - 05 Apr 2020
Abstract
The use of real textures is the optimal way to present realistic textures in a VR (Virtual Reality) experience. However, a system may require the presentation of numerous objects in a VR scene, making the use of real objects impractical. One way to [...] Read more.
The use of real textures is the optimal way to present realistic textures in a VR (Virtual Reality) experience. However, a system may require the presentation of numerous objects in a VR scene, making the use of real objects impractical. One way to address this issue is to present visual and tactile texture information simultaneously such that multiple different visual textures are associated with one tactile sensation. This tactile sensation must differ from the visual information only to the extent that the user still perceives the stimuli as consistent. This study examines the consistency required for the simultaneous presentation of visual and tactile sensations for the purpose of reducing the number of necessary real textures in future VR systems. An experiment was conducted using one-dimensional textures (i.e., line gratings), in which participants were asked whether the presented visual texture was finer or coarser than the tactile texture. The results suggest that the relative size of the “permissible range” (the range over which the difference between the visual and tactile sensation is not recognized) is correlated with the spatial period of the real texture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haptics: Technology and Applications)
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