Special Issue "BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Antonia Spano'
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Guest Editor
Politecnico di Torino
Interests: Image- and range-based survey methods (close range photogrammetry, LiDAR, Mobile mapping systems mainly applied to built and cultural heritage); 3d models; spatial data standards; GIS tools and analysis; 3D mapping and 3D GIS; semantics; ontologies; BIM and HBIM
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Dr. Francesca Noardo
Website
Guest Editor
Built Environment and Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Nethlands
Interests: GIS; 3D city models; GeoBIM; spatial data integration
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Dr. Margarita Kokla
Website
Guest Editor
School of Rural and Surveying Engineering, National Technical University of Athens
Interests: semantic representation of geospatial knowledge; geospatial ontologies; semantic information extraction and integration; semantic interoperability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, 3D models of cities and their buildings, including geometric and semantic contents, have been largely acknowledged as a powerful tool for many research fields and applications (building and infrastructure design, restoration support, urban planning, asset management, and so on). BIM (building information models), the development of HBIM (historical BIM) is also of topical relevance, particularly, when historical architectural assets are involved.

The great development (in number and functionalities) of BIM systems and tools, leads to relevant questions about how to actually enhance their flexibility, in order to make their exchange, maintenance, and re-usability effective (e.g., to integrate the urban mapping products, in which buildings play a major role).

The use of open standards is, obviously, a good choice, but many issues surrounding open standards remain unresolved. Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) by buildingSMART is the affirmed open standard for managing BIMs. However, many other standards exist for the same objects, concerning the buildings and their context (OGC CityGML, gbXML, the INSPIRE data model, and national standards are some examples). Their effective integration has been the topic of many studies, using different approaches (manual, mapping approaches, ontologies, and many more), but there has been no definitive solution.

Moreover, other 3D models and spatial products are based on mapping standards and derive from survey and modeling methods of a different nature (from image and range based acquisitions, remote sensing, lidar, different modeling techniques, etc.). Therefore, their interoperability with BIM can sometimes be very limited.

It is necessary to solve the problems of interoperability and standardization, in order to build efficient and useful BIMs and HBIMs, which can effectively take advantage of the many available technologies for their management.

This Special Issue of the journal Applied Sciences, “BIM and HBIM, Standardization and Interoperability” will outline how the proposed solutions for interoperability and the use of standards can bring advantages for BIM and HBIM applications (including design and construction projects, use of BIM in urban space planning, historical built heritage documentation, conservation projects, and asset management, together with the projects that address the emerging problems of our era: lower energy consumptions, smart networking, logistics, guide to choices and strategies for conservation, enhancing resilience, and so on).

Prof. Dr. Antonia Spano'
Dr. Francesca Noardo
Dr. Margarita Kokla
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • BIM /HBIM models derived from points clouds
  • data acquisition and processing in BIM and HBIM
  • rapid digitalization
  • model accuracy
  • informative contents: level of details (LOD), level of information (LOI), level of development
  • on-site data acquisition and management for BIM/HBIM
  • HBIM for conservation and restoration contexts
  • object libraries
  • models inventory
  • semantics for BIM/HBIM
  • openBIM
  • GeoDB BIM
  • standardization and interoperability in BIM/HBIM
  • geoBIM
  • BIM applications
  • ontologies
  • semantics
  • open standards

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
HBIM as Support of Preventive Conservation Actions in Heritage Architecture. Experience of the Renaissance Quadrant Façade of the Cathedral of Seville
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 2428; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10072428 - 02 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper discusses the generation of Historic Building Information Models (HBIM) for the management of heritage information aimed at the preventive conservation of assets of cultural interest, through its experimentation in a specific case study: the façade of the Renaissance quadrant of the [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the generation of Historic Building Information Models (HBIM) for the management of heritage information aimed at the preventive conservation of assets of cultural interest, through its experimentation in a specific case study: the façade of the Renaissance quadrant of the Cathedral of Seville. Two methodological aspects are presented: On the one hand, the process of modeling the solid entities that compose the digital model of the object of study, based on the semi-automatic estimation of the generating surfaces of the main faces; on the other hand, a methodological proposal for the modeling of information on the surface of the model. A series of images and data tables are shown as a result of the application of these methods. These represent the process of introducing information related to the current conservation status documentation and recording the treatments included in the preventive conservation works recently developed by a specialized company. The implementation of the digital model in the exposed work validates it as a solvency option, provided from the infographic medium, when facing the need to contain, manage and visualize all the information generated in preventive conservation actions on heritage architecture, facilitating, in turn, cross-cutting relationships between the different analysis that result in a deeper knowledge of this type of building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability)
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Open AccessArticle
An Ontology-Based Representation of Vaulted System for HBIM
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1377; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041377 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In recent years, many efforts have been invested in the cultural heritage digitization: surveying, modelling, diagnostic analysis and historic data collection. Nowadays, this effort is finalized in many cases towards historical building information modelling (HBIM). However, the architecture, engineering, construction and facility management [...] Read more.
In recent years, many efforts have been invested in the cultural heritage digitization: surveying, modelling, diagnostic analysis and historic data collection. Nowadays, this effort is finalized in many cases towards historical building information modelling (HBIM). However, the architecture, engineering, construction and facility management (AEC-FM) domain is very fragmented and many experts operating with different data types and models are involved in HBIM projects. This prevents effective communication and sharing of the results not only among different professionals but also among different projects. Semantic web tools may significantly contribute in facilitating sharing, connection and integration of data provided in different domains and projects. The paper describes this aspect specifically focusing on managing the information and models acquired on the case of vaulted systems. Information is collected within a semantic based hub platform to perform cross correlation. Such functionality allows the reconstructing of the rich history of the construction techniques and skilled workers across Europe. To this purpose an ontology-based vaults database has been undertaken and an example of its implementation is presented. The developed ontology-based vaults database is a database that makes uses of a set of ontologies to effectively combine data and information from multiple heterogeneous sources. The defined ontologies provide a high-level schema of a data source and provides a vocabulary for user queries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability)
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Open AccessArticle
How to Adopt BIM in the Building Construction Sector across Greece?
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1371; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041371 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
The construction sector is of strategic importance for the European Commission. This is the reason why there is a special interest in the development of this sector which is attempting to transform into a more sustainable one in order to face various challenges. [...] Read more.
The construction sector is of strategic importance for the European Commission. This is the reason why there is a special interest in the development of this sector which is attempting to transform into a more sustainable one in order to face various challenges. In this context, European Directive 2014/24/EU brings to the foreground of the European institutional framework the term building information modelling (BIM), that it is widely used in many countries across Europe. In Greece, the situation seems to be different, not only because it has not been applied in practice but also because of some special features of the way the construction sector functions. This paper presents the BIM use-level in Greece and the way with which it could be better integrated in the construction sector. Through this review we make a brief assessment of the strategy developed in order for the BIM to be integrated in Greek building procedures. Furthermore, we focus on specific issues, like the extended informal housing phenomenon, and on factors that cannot easily be standardized that create problems in BIM use. Finally, through an initial market analysis we underline the role of academic institutions for integrating BIM across Greece. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
HBIM-GIS Integration: From IFC to CityGML Standard for Damaged Cultural Heritage in a Multiscale 3D GIS
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1356; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041356 - 17 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study describes the technical-systemic and conceptual-informative interoperability tests for the integration of a Historic Building Information Modeling (HBIM) model in a 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) environment aimed to provide complete and useful documentation for multiscale analyses on cultural heritage particularly exposed [...] Read more.
This study describes the technical-systemic and conceptual-informative interoperability tests for the integration of a Historic Building Information Modeling (HBIM) model in a 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) environment aimed to provide complete and useful documentation for multiscale analyses on cultural heritage particularly exposed to risks. The case study of the San Lorenzo Church in Norcia (Italy) has been chosen given the urgent need to update the existing documentation for its protection and conservation issues, due to the extensive damage suffered after the series of earthquakes that occurred in central Italy starting from summer 2016. Different tests to evaluate two levels of conceptual interoperability (technical and semantic) when importing the HBIM model into a GIS environment were performed, whether with commercial software or with open source ones (ArcGIS Pro and QGIS, respectively). A data integration platform (Feature Manipulation Engine, FME) has been used for converting the IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) data format into the GML (Geography Markup Language) format, in order to obtain a unique and unified model and vocabulary for the 3D GIS project, structured with different levels of detail, according to CityGML standard. Finally, as HBIM-GIS integration is considered, the loss of geometric and informative data has been taken into account and evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability)
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Open AccessArticle
Networking Historic Environmental Standards to Address Modern Challenges for Sustainable Conservation in HBIM
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10041283 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Awareness of the logic and context of original (and subsequent) design priorities is critical to informing decisions relating to valorisation, repair, refurbishment, energy retrofit or re-use of built heritage. A key benefit of collating data through Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) should be [...] Read more.
Awareness of the logic and context of original (and subsequent) design priorities is critical to informing decisions relating to valorisation, repair, refurbishment, energy retrofit or re-use of built heritage. A key benefit of collating data through Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) should be to assist others facing similar challenges. Here, examples for sharing understanding of how components belong to a system are outlined in the context of a newly completed dataset of public library buildings in the UK funded by Andrew Carnegie, predominantly built between 1900 and 1914. Demands for the functionality and economy of public library buildings, coupled with the emergent standardisation of building components at the time, provide a specific condition with potential for further iteration to other buildings of the period or related typologies. The work highlights the urgency of providing cost-efficient knowledge sharing structures in an era of altered priorities with respect to energy use for modern heritage. We propose the means for mapping common features to network knowledge amongst stakeholders through relevant open source pathways. The results demonstrate that integrating geographic approaches to knowledge sharing in HBIM with environmental considerations also supports wider questions of risk management related to the stewardship of historic buildings in the context of climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM and HBIM: Standardisation and interoperability)
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