Special Issue "The Adsorption of Emerging Contaminants in an Aqueous Environment Ⅱ"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Silvia Álvarez-Torrellas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grupo de Catálisis y Procesos de Separación-CyPS, Dept Ingeniería Química y de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Complutense University, Avda Complutense S-N, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.
Interests: Adsorption processes, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Modelling, Nanostructured Carbon Materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Juan García Rodríguez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Catalysis and Separation Processes Group (CyPS), Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: adsorption processes; catalytic wet air oxidation; synthesis and characterization of carbon materials; wastewater treatments; 3-D printing of carbon materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New and emerging pollutants present a novel global water quality challenge with potentially serious threats to human health and ecosystems. These contaminants mainly include chemicals found in pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, industrial and household products, metals, surfactants, industrial additives, and solvents. Many of them are used and released continuously into the environment, even in very low quantities, and some may cause chronic toxicity, endocrine disruption in humans and aquatic wildlife, and the development of bacterial pathogen resistance. Adsorption (batch and fixed bed) is a fundamental process in the physicochemical treatment of wastewaters, which can economically meet today's higher effluent standards and water reuse requirements. This Special Issue is focused on adsorption processes as alternative treatment methods for emerging aqueous contaminants. Original research papers and short reviews addressing the synthesis and characterization of new adsorbents, the influence of the different operating parameters, competitive adsorption, influence of the adsorption process on antibiotic resistance, and the description of adsorption mechanisms and modeling are invited for submission.

Prof. Dr. Silvia Silvia Álvarez-Torrellas
Prof. Dr. Juan García Rodríguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Emerging contaminants
  • Adsorption kinetics
  • Competitive adsorption
  • Modeling
  • Synthesis and characterization
  • Mass transfer
  • Influence of adsorption on antibiotic resistance.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Engineering Functionalized Chitosan-Based Sorbent Material: Characterization and Sorption of Toxic Elements
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5138; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235138 - 27 Nov 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 756
Abstract
The present study reports the engineering of functionalized chitosan (CH)-based biosorbent material. Herein, a two-step reaction was performed to chemically modify the CH using 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl) piperazine to incorporate nitrogen basic centers for cations sorption from the aqueous environment. The resultant functionalized chitosan-based sorbent [...] Read more.
The present study reports the engineering of functionalized chitosan (CH)-based biosorbent material. Herein, a two-step reaction was performed to chemically modify the CH using 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl) piperazine to incorporate nitrogen basic centers for cations sorption from the aqueous environment. The resultant functionalized chitosan-based sorbent material was designated as CH-ANP and characterized using various analytical techniques, including elemental analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C NMR (in solid-state), X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis. Then, the newly engineered CH-ANP was employed for the removal of copper, lead, and cadmium in the aqueous medium. Langmuir sorption isotherm analysis revealed that the highest sorption abilities achieved were 2.82, 1.96, and 1.60 mmol g−1 for copper, cadmium, and lead, respectively. Linear and nonlinear regression methods were deployed on the sorption data to study the behavior of the Langmuir, the Freundlich, and the Temkin sorption isotherms. Among the four different forms, the Langmuir isotherm type 1 fit well to the experimental data as compared to the other models. It also showed the lowest values of error, and a higher correlation coefficient than the Freundlich and Temkin models; thus it was the best fit with the experimental data compared to the latter two models. In conclusion, the findings suggest that chemically modified novel materials with enhanced Lewis basic centers are useful and promising candidates for the sorption of various toxic cations in aqueous solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Adsorption of Emerging Contaminants in an Aqueous Environment Ⅱ)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanistic Study of Phosphorus Adsorption onto Iron Z-A: Spectroscopic and Experimental Approach
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(22), 4897; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9224897 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 715
Abstract
Iron was incorporated into an LTA type zeolite using the sol-gel hydrothermal method to form Iron-zeolite-A (Iron-Z-A), and its phosphate adsorption-desorption efficiency were analyzed. Samples were characterized by EDS, SEM, XRD, EPR, FT-IR XPS, and Raman to ensure the apt synthesis of Iron-Z-A [...] Read more.
Iron was incorporated into an LTA type zeolite using the sol-gel hydrothermal method to form Iron-zeolite-A (Iron-Z-A), and its phosphate adsorption-desorption efficiency were analyzed. Samples were characterized by EDS, SEM, XRD, EPR, FT-IR XPS, and Raman to ensure the apt synthesis of Iron-Z-A and to interpret the mechanism of adsorption-desorption of PO43− in an aqueous solution. EPR and XPS analysis confirmed that the iron was doped as Fe3+ in the LTA structure. The XPS peak shift (Fe-2p), FT-IR band shift, and intensity change (–OH) confirmed the existence of the ligand exchange mechanism. In the adsorption phase at pH 5, the derivative of phosphate (H2PO4) acts as a ligand and interacts with OH of Fe on the zeolite surface to form “Iron-zeolite (oxy) hydroxide bound phosphate”. In the desorption phase at pH 10, phosphate ligand is detached and get mixed in the aqueous phase as HPO42−. The EDS data, Si–O–Al band shift and intensity change in FT-IR and XPS peak intensity change proved the contribution of Al in the process of adsorption. The data of adsorption fitted well with the Langmuir’s isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The amount of PO43− adsorbed was a function of adsorbent’s surface area regardless of concentration. The amount of PO43− being adsorbed by the metal ions was found to be 382.296 mg PO43−/g Fe and 56.296 mg PO43−/g Al. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Adsorption of Emerging Contaminants in an Aqueous Environment Ⅱ)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Effective Adsorption of Methylene Blue dye onto Magnetic Nanocomposites. Modeling and Reuse Studies
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4563; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214563 - 27 Oct 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 974
Abstract
In the present study, new adsorbent beads of alginate (A)/maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3)/functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-CNT) were prepared and characterized by several techniques, e.g., N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG), [...] Read more.
In the present study, new adsorbent beads of alginate (A)/maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3)/functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-CNT) were prepared and characterized by several techniques, e.g., N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and further tested for the adsorption of the dye methylene blue (MB) from water. The beads (A/γ-Fe2O3/f-CNT) presented a relatively low BET specific surface area value of 59 m2g−1. The magnetization saturation values of A/γ-Fe2O3/f-CNT beads determined at 295 K was equal to 27.16 emu g−1, indicating a magnetic character. The time needed to attain the equilibrium of MB adsorption onto the beads was estimated within 48 h. Thus, several kinetic and isotherm equation models were used to fit the kinetic and equilibrium experimental results. The number of adsorbed MB molecules per active site, the anchorage number, the receptor sites density, the adsorbed quantity at saturation, the concentration at half saturation and the molar adsorption energy were quantified using the monolayer model. The calculated negative ΔG0 and positive ΔH0 values suggested the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, A/γ-Fe2O3/f-CNT composites can be used at least for six times maintaining their significant adsorptive performance and could be easily separated by using a magnet from water after treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Adsorption of Emerging Contaminants in an Aqueous Environment Ⅱ)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Residual Biomasses and Its Application for the Removal of Lead Ions from Aqueous Solution
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4486; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214486 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 598
Abstract
The removal of water pollutants has been widely addressed for the conservation of the environment, and novel materials are being developed as adsorbent to address this issue. In this work, different residual biomasses were employed to prepare biosorbents applied to lead (Pb(II)) ion [...] Read more.
The removal of water pollutants has been widely addressed for the conservation of the environment, and novel materials are being developed as adsorbent to address this issue. In this work, different residual biomasses were employed to prepare biosorbents applied to lead (Pb(II)) ion uptake. The choice of cassava peels (CP), banana peels (BP), yam peels (YP), and oil palm bagasse (OPB) was made due to the availability of such biomasses in the Department of Bolivar (Colombia), derived from agro-industrial activities. The materials were characterized by ultimate and proximate analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis (BET), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) in order to determine the physicochemical properties of bioadsorbents. The adsorption tests were carried out in batch mode, keeping the initial metal concentration at 100 ppm, temperature at 30 °C, particle size at 1 mm, and solution pH at 6. The experimental results were adjusted to kinetic and isotherm models to determine the adsorption mechanism. The remaining concentration of Pb(II) in solution was measured by atomic absorption at 217 nm. The functional groups identified in FTIR spectra are characteristic of lignocellulosic materials. A high surface area was found for all biomaterials with the exception of yam peels. A low pore volume and size, related to the mesoporous structure of these materials, make these bioadsorbents a suitable alternative for liquid phase adsorption, since they facilitate the diffusion of Pb(II) ions onto the adsorbent structure. Both FTIR and EDS techniques confirmed ion precipitation onto adsorbent materials after the adsorption process. The adsorption tests reported efficiency values above 80% for YP, BP, and CP, indicating a good uptake of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. The results reported that Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second order best fit experimental data, suggesting that the adsorption process is governed by chemical reactions and multilayer uptake. The future prospective of this work lies in the identification of alternatives to reuse Pb(II)-contaminated biomasses after heavy metal adsorption, such as material immobilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Adsorption of Emerging Contaminants in an Aqueous Environment Ⅱ)
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