Special Issue "Active Nano Optics"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Branko Kolaric
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Micro- and Nanophotonic Materials Group, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium
Interests: nanophotonics; biophotonics and quantum optics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. André Stefanov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern, Hochschulstrasse 63012 Bern, Switchland
Interests: quantum optics; entanglement; quantum imaging and sensing; quantum information
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Brana Jelenkovic
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Center for Photonics, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade
Interests: biophotonics and quantum optics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Focus Issue, we have the ambition to cover classical areas of nano-optics, including nanophotonics and plasmonics, and go beyond those and towards quantum effects, for instance, strong coupling and quantum plasmonics. This issue will be covering how cutting-edge technologies and ground-breaking ideas in nano-optical research can be combined in an interdisciplinary approach to address fundamental challenges in nanooptics and define new routes for applications in the classical and quantum domain. The main focus for applications of nanoscale optics and photonics is on quantum communication and sensing, including single photon detection and generation, biophotonics, and materials science.

Prof. Dr. Branko Kolaric
Prof. Dr. Andre Stefanov
Prof. Dr. Brana Jelenkovic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Implications of Negative Quantum Conditional Entropy—H2 Mobility in Nanoporous Materials
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(22), 8266; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10228266 - 21 Nov 2020
Viewed by 410
Abstract
During the last few decades, considerable advances in quantum information theory have shown deep existing connections between quantum correlation effects (like entanglement and quantum discord) and thermodynamics. Here the concept of conditional entropy plays a considerable role. In contrast to the classical case, [...] Read more.
During the last few decades, considerable advances in quantum information theory have shown deep existing connections between quantum correlation effects (like entanglement and quantum discord) and thermodynamics. Here the concept of conditional entropy plays a considerable role. In contrast to the classical case, quantum conditional entropy can take negative values. This counter-intuitive feature, already well understood in the context of information theory, was recently shown theoretically to also have a physical meaning in quantum thermodynamics [del Rio et al. Nature 2011, 474, 61]. Extending this existing work, here we provide evidence of the significance of negative conditional entropy in a concrete experimental context: Incoherent Neutron Scattering (INS) from protons of H2 in nano-scale environments; e.g., in INS from H2 in C-nanotubes, the data of the H2 translational motion along the nanotube axis seems to show that the neutron apparently scatters from a fictitious particle with mass of 0.64 atomic mass units (a.m.u.)—instead of the value of 2 a.m.u. as conventionally expected. An independent second experiment confirms this finding. However, taking into account the possible negativity of conditional entropy, we explain that this effect has a natural interpretation in terms of quantum thermodynamics. Moreover, it is intrinsically related to the number of qubits capturing the interaction of the two quantum systems H2 and C-nanotube. The considered effect may have technological applications (e.g., in H-storage materials and fuel cells). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Nano Optics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Molding Wetting by Laser-Induced Nanostructures
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 6008; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10176008 - 30 Aug 2020
Viewed by 485
Abstract
The influence of material characteristics—i.e., type or surface texture—to wetting properties is nowadays increased by the implementation of ultrafast lasers for nanostructuring. In this account, we exposed multilayer thin metal film samples of different materials to a femtosecond laser beam at a 1030 [...] Read more.
The influence of material characteristics—i.e., type or surface texture—to wetting properties is nowadays increased by the implementation of ultrafast lasers for nanostructuring. In this account, we exposed multilayer thin metal film samples of different materials to a femtosecond laser beam at a 1030 nm wavelength. The interaction generated high-quality laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) of spatial periods between 740 and 790 nm and with maximal average corrugation height below 100 nm. The contact angle (CA) values of the water droplets on the surface were estimated and the values between unmodified and modified samples were compared. Even though the laser interaction changed both the surface morphology and the chemical composition, the wetting properties were predominantly influenced by the small change in morphology causing the increase in the contact angle of ~80%, which could not be explained classically. The influence of both surface corrugation and chemical composition to the wetting properties has been thoroughly investigated, discussed and explained. The presented results clearly confirm that femtosecond patterning can be used to mold wetting properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Nano Optics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Cascaded Nanorod Arrays for Ultrabroadband, Omnidirectional and Polarization-Insensitive Absorption
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 3878; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10113878 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 487
Abstract
An ultrabroadband, omnidirectional, and polarization-insensitive absorber based on cascaded nanorod arrays (CNAs) is numerically demonstrated, and an average absorptivity of 98.2% with a relative absorption bandwidth (RAB) of 149.8% can be achieved in the 0.38–2.65 μm wavelength range. The proposed CNA-based absorber requires [...] Read more.
An ultrabroadband, omnidirectional, and polarization-insensitive absorber based on cascaded nanorod arrays (CNAs) is numerically demonstrated, and an average absorptivity of 98.2% with a relative absorption bandwidth (RAB) of 149.8% can be achieved in the 0.38–2.65 μm wavelength range. The proposed CNA-based absorber requires only several pairs of multilayers to achieve excellent absorption performance. More significantly, the physical mechanism for this intriguing ultrabroadband absorption results from the synergistic effect of localized surface plasmon (LSP) and plasmonic resonant cavity (PRC) modes, which is fundamentally different from the tapered metal/dielectric multilayer-based absorbers associated with the slow-light mode. We investigated the absorption properties of the CNA-based metasurface by using the impedance theory, which indicates that the impedance of the structure matches well with the impedance of the free space from the visible to near-infrared wavelength range. In addition, the absorption properties of the CNA-based metasurface are robust to the variation of the structural parameters and the metal/dielectric materials, and ultrabroadband absorption performance can be maintained within 0–60° for both TM and TE modes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Nano Optics)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Photo-Thermoelectric Conversion of Plasmonic Nanohole Array
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(8), 2681; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10082681 - 13 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 676
Abstract
Plasmonic photo-thermoelectric conversion offers an alternative photodetection mechanism that is not restricted by semiconductor bandgaps. Here, we report a plasmonic photodetector consisting of an ultra-thin silver film with nanohole array, whose photodetection mechanism is based on thermoelectric conversion triggered by plasmonic local heating. [...] Read more.
Plasmonic photo-thermoelectric conversion offers an alternative photodetection mechanism that is not restricted by semiconductor bandgaps. Here, we report a plasmonic photodetector consisting of an ultra-thin silver film with nanohole array, whose photodetection mechanism is based on thermoelectric conversion triggered by plasmonic local heating. The detector exhibits a maximum photocurrent at the wavelength of the surface plasmon polaritons, determined by the periodicity of the nanoholes. Hence, the response wavelength of the detector can be controlled via the morphological parameters of the nanohole pattern. The contribution of plasmonic local heating to thermoelectric conversion is verified experimentally and numerically, enabling discussion on the mechanisms governing light detection. These results provide a starting point for the development of other nanoscale photodetectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Active Nano Optics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop