Special Issue "Feature Papers for Applied Nano"

A special issue of Applied Nano (ISSN 2673-3501).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Angelo Maria Taglietti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Pavia, I-27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: antibacterial nanomaterials and surfaces; anisotropic noble metal nanoparticles for functionalization and application to biomedical and sensing problems and use in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS); theranostic devices; supramolecular chemistry; transition metal complexes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will contain some of the first, most important papers of Applied Nano.

The scope of this Special Issue is to show how the use of the nanotechnology tool kit offers opportunities and provides solutions to challenges involving a wide range of disciplines.

The goal is to gather a large set of articles, in order to spotlight nanotechnology-based systems applied to the chemical, physical, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and environmental fields. It could include, for example, water sciences, material sciences, cultural heritage, energy storage and conversion, antibacterial applications, green nanochemistry, electronics and photonics, sensing systems, and theranostics.

To enhance the impact of nanotechnology solutions on society, we strongly believe that nano innovations based on reproducible and affordable preparation are needed. We are thus particularly interested in receiving manuscripts reporting original and robust nanomaterials synthetic procedures to be used in original and cutting-edge applications, both in established and emerging fields.

We strongly encourage both Editorial Board Members and young investigators to join this Special Issue, but more generally, we invite researchers and practitioners from all areas of nanotechnology and nanochemistry to submit manuscripts for this fundamental and exciting Special Issue of Applied Nano. We welcome both original research papers and review papers on diverse relevant topics.

All the papers will be published free of charge in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Angelo Maria Taglietti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Nano is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Interactions and Binding Energies in Carbon Nanotube Bundles
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(2), 128-147; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2020011 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 286
Abstract
On any size scale, it is important to know how strongly structural components are held together. The purpose of this work was to develop a means to estimate the collective binding energy holding together a bundle of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Carbon nanotubes [...] Read more.
On any size scale, it is important to know how strongly structural components are held together. The purpose of this work was to develop a means to estimate the collective binding energy holding together a bundle of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Carbon nanotubes in isolation and in bundles have unique and useful properties and applications within supramolecular structures and nanotechnology. Equations were derived to represent the total number of pairwise interactions between the CNTs found in various size and shape bundles. The shapes considered included diamond, hexagon, parallelogram, and rectangle. Parameters were used to characterize the size of a bundle for each defined shape. Force field molecular modeling was used to obtain the total bundle binding energies for a number of sample bundles. From the number of interactions per bundle, the binding energy per interaction was determined. This process was repeated for armchair CNTs having a range of length and circumference values. A simple equation described the interaction energy based on the length and circumference of the component armchair type nanotubes. When combined with the bundle shape and size parameters, the total bundle binding energy could be found. Comparison with whole bundle molecular mechanics calculations showed our formula-based approach to be effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Article
Removal of Cyanotoxins–Microcystins from Water by Filtration through Granulated Composites of Bentonite with Micelles of the Cation Octadecyltrimethyl Ammonium (ODTMA)
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(1), 67-81; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2010006 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 935
Abstract
Cyanobacteria and their toxins present potential hazards to consumers of water from lakes, reservoirs and rivers; thus, their removal via water treatment is essential. Previously, we demonstrated that nanocomposites of octadecyltrimethyl ammonium (ODTMA) complexed with clay could efficiently remove cyanobacteria and their toxins [...] Read more.
Cyanobacteria and their toxins present potential hazards to consumers of water from lakes, reservoirs and rivers; thus, their removal via water treatment is essential. Previously, we demonstrated that nanocomposites of octadecyltrimethyl ammonium (ODTMA) complexed with clay could efficiently remove cyanobacteria and their toxins from laboratory cultures and lake water. In this study, we determined the capacity of ODTMA nanocomposites to remove cyanotoxins, namely microcystins (MCs), from water to below 1 µg/L via filtration. This capacity was 1500 mg MC-LR per Kg of nanocomposite. Similar capacities were estimated for the removal of other MC congeners (MC-WR, MC-3aspWR and MC-YR), whereas substantially lower capacities were recorded for more positively charged MC congeners, such as MC-RR and MC-3aspRR. Filtration results were simulated with a filtration model, which considers convection and adsorption/desorption of one to several toxins. Model calculations for the removal of MC-LR, under a variety of situations, fitted well with all the experimentally measured values and also estimated the co-removal of several MC congeners. In agreement with model predictions, results demonstrated that in the presence of MC-WR, the emerging concentrations of MC-RR congeners eventually exceed their solution values. In conclusion, granulated nanocomposites of ODTMA–bentonite can be applied for the removal of microcystins from drinking water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Article
RF Sputter-Deposited Nanostructured CuO Films for Micro-Supercapacitors
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(1), 46-66; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2010005 - 25 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 581
Abstract
Copper oxide is considered as an alternative electrode material for supercapacitors due to its low cost, chemical stability and high theoretical specific capacitance. In the present work, nanostructured copper oxide (CuO) films are prepared by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, and the influence of [...] Read more.
Copper oxide is considered as an alternative electrode material for supercapacitors due to its low cost, chemical stability and high theoretical specific capacitance. In the present work, nanostructured copper oxide (CuO) films are prepared by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, and the influence of the substrate temperature on the microstructure and supercapacitive properties was studied. The copper oxide films prepared at 350 °C exhibit a predominant (1¯11) orientation corresponding to the monoclinic Cu(II)O phase with a crystallite size of 24 nm. The surface of the film consists of uniformly distributed oval-like grains providing a high surface roughness of 45 nm. The films exhibit an optical bandgap of 1.68 ± 0.01 eV and an electrical conductivity of 0.4 S cm−1 at room temperature. The as-prepared CuO films deliver a discharge specific capacitance of 387 mF cm−2 (375 F g−1) at a current density of 1 mA cm−2 with excellent cyclic capacitance retention of 95% (367 mF cm−2) even after 1000 cycles. Hence, these films are potential electrodes for micro-supercapacitors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Article
Extending the Shelf Life of Strawberries by the Sonochemical Coating of their Surface with Nanoparticles of an Edible Anti-Bacterial Compound
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(1), 14-24; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2010002 - 04 Jan 2021
Viewed by 675
Abstract
The current paper presents the coating of harvested strawberries with edible nanoparticles of Chitosan. The NPs were formed by the application of ultrasonic waves on an acidic solution of chitosan. In a one-step process the nanoparticles were created and subsequent to their formation [...] Read more.
The current paper presents the coating of harvested strawberries with edible nanoparticles of Chitosan. The NPs were formed by the application of ultrasonic waves on an acidic solution of chitosan. In a one-step process the nanoparticles were created and subsequent to their formation they were deposited on the strawberries surface. The shelf life of the NPs coated was compared with the deposition of the same amount of non-sonicated chitosan, i.e., coating of individual chitosan molecules on the fruit. The characterization of the coated fruits was carried out by monitoring the weight loss. TSS (total soluble solids), pH, TA (titratable acidity), and Vitamin C. Finally, the freshness of the strawberries was determined by eye observation. In addition, the characterization of the chitosan NPs was also conducted in this study by (DLS) dynamic light scattering and (SEM) scanning electron microscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Article
Palladium-Nanoparticles Biohybrids in Applied Chemistry
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(1), 1-13; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2010001 - 29 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 739
Abstract
Applied nanotechnology has experienced tremendous advance over the last decade. In this study, the efficient synthesis of highly stable palladium-nanoparticles (PdNPs) biohybrids based on the application of an enzyme, which induces in situ the generation of spherical nanoparticles on the protein network, has [...] Read more.
Applied nanotechnology has experienced tremendous advance over the last decade. In this study, the efficient synthesis of highly stable palladium-nanoparticles (PdNPs) biohybrids based on the application of an enzyme, which induces in situ the generation of spherical nanoparticles on the protein network, has been described. A heterogeneous material was synthesized formed with PdNPs with average sizes between 1.5 to 5 nm. These Pd nanocatalysts were successfully applied in different chemical processes: C-C bonding reactions (Suzuki and Heck reactions) and cascade processes combining enzymatic and metallic activities (hydrolysis-reduction, esterification-racemization). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Review

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Review
Applied Nanotechnologies in Anticoagulant Therapy: From Anticoagulants to Coagulation Test Performance of Drug Delivery Systems
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(2), 98-117; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2020009 - 01 May 2021
Viewed by 479
Abstract
Heparin-based delivery systems have been explored to improve their therapeutic efficacy and to reduce toxicity for different administration routes. Regardless of the applied drug delivery system (DDS), the evaluation of anticoagulant performance is instrumental for the development of a suitable DDS. The understanding [...] Read more.
Heparin-based delivery systems have been explored to improve their therapeutic efficacy and to reduce toxicity for different administration routes. Regardless of the applied drug delivery system (DDS), the evaluation of anticoagulant performance is instrumental for the development of a suitable DDS. The understanding of the range of anticoagulant assays, together with their key applications and limitations, is essential both within the context of scientific research and for clinical usage. This review provides an overview of the current anticoagulant therapy and discusses the advantages and limitations of currently available anticoagulant assays. We also discuss studies involving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH)-based nanocarriers with emphasis on their anticoagulation performance. Conventional anticoagulants have been used for decades for the treatment of many diseases. Direct oral anticoagulants have overcome some limitations of heparins and vitamin K antagonists. However, the lack of an accurate laboratory assessment, as well as the lack of a factor “xaban” (Xa) inhibitor reversal agent, remains a major problem associated with these anticoagulants. LMWHs represent anticoagulant agents with noteworthy efficacy and safety, and they have been explored to improve their outcomes with various nanocarriers through several administration routes. The main problems related to LMWHs have been surmounted, and improved efficiency may be achieved through the use of DDSs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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Review
Prussian Blue and Its Analogs as Novel Nanostructured Antibacterial Materials
Appl. Nano 2021, 2(2), 85-97; https://doi.org/10.3390/applnano2020008 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 455
Abstract
Prussian blue is an ancient artificial pigment. Its biocompatibility and the possibility of synthesizing it in nanometric size stimulated the interest of the scientific community. Many uses of Prussian blue nanoparticles have been reported in the field of nanomedicine. More recently, interest into [...] Read more.
Prussian blue is an ancient artificial pigment. Its biocompatibility and the possibility of synthesizing it in nanometric size stimulated the interest of the scientific community. Many uses of Prussian blue nanoparticles have been reported in the field of nanomedicine. More recently, interest into the potential application of Prussian blue nanoparticles as antibacterial agents has spread. Literature regarding Prussian blue and its analogs as antibacterial materials is still limited, but the number of papers has grown quickly over the last 2–3 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Applied Nano)
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