Special Issue "Oxidative Stress in Plant"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "ROS, RNS and RSS".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Juan B. Barroso
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, nitro fatty acids, Post-translational modifications, S-nitrosylation, nitration, protein oxidation, nitroalkylation, abiotic stress, plant immunity, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress.
Dr. Mounira Chaki
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, signalling, nitrolipids, nitration, S-nitrosylation, nitroalkylation, biotic and abiotic stresses, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress
Dr. Juan C. Begara-Morales
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, nitro fatty acids, S-nitrosylation, nitration, protein oxidation, nitroalkylation, abiotic stress, plant immunity, oxidative stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants are exposed to different biotic and abiotic stresses leading to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are highly toxic and could cause impairment to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids that finally results in an oxidative stress. Excessive concentrations of ROS are strictly regulated by ROS scavenging pathways such as efficient enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defence systems that protect plant cells from oxidative stress damage. Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduce oxidative stress in plants. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals have emerged as the main ROS playing a key role as secondary messengers by regulating diverse function in plants; however its accumulation at high levels causes oxidative damage leading to cell death. Over the past decades significant progresses have been made to understand the role of ROS and its signalling behaviour in plants under stress.

This Special Issue aims to publish original research papers and reviews on aspects of oxidative stress in plants under different stress conditions. The topics covered in this issue will include ROS production and scavenging, ROS signalling in plants, involvement of ROS in cell death, and the role of plants enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants under stress conditions.

Dr. Juan B. Barroso
Dr. Mounira Chaki
Dr. Juan C. Begara-Morales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oxidative stress
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Superoxide radical
  • Hydrogen sulfide
  • Antioxidant systems
  • Signalling
  • Biotic stress
  • Abiotic stress

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Published Papers (13 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Oxidative Stress in Plants
Antioxidants 2020, 9(6), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9060481 - 03 Jun 2020
Abstract
Environmental stresses negatively affect plant growth, development and crop productivity [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Inactivation of Carbonyl-Detoxifying Enzymes by H2O2 Is a Trigger to Increase Carbonyl Load for Initiating Programmed Cell Death in Plants
Antioxidants 2020, 9(2), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9020141 - 06 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
H2O2-induced programmed cell death (PCD) of tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells is mediated by reactive carbonyl species (RCS), degradation products of lipid peroxides, which activate caspase-3-like protease (C3LP). Here, we investigated the mechanism of RCS accumulation in the H [...] Read more.
H2O2-induced programmed cell death (PCD) of tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells is mediated by reactive carbonyl species (RCS), degradation products of lipid peroxides, which activate caspase-3-like protease (C3LP). Here, we investigated the mechanism of RCS accumulation in the H2O2-induced PCD of BY-2 cells. The following biochemical changes were observed in 10-min response to a lethal dose (1.0 mM) of H2O2, but they did not occur in a sublethal dose (0.5 mM) of H2O2. (1) The C3LP activity was increased twofold. (2) The intracellular levels of RCS, i.e., 4-hydroxy-(E)-hexenal and 4-hydroxy-(E)-nonenal (HNE), were increased 1.2–1.5-fold. (3) The activity of a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent carbonyl reductase, scavenging HNE, and n-hexanal was decreased. Specifically, these are the earliest events leading to PCD. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed the H2O2-induced PCD, indicating that the C3LP activity of the β1 subunit of the 20S proteasome was responsible for PCD. The addition of H2O2 to cell-free protein extract inactivated the carbonyl reductase. Taken together, these results suggest a PCD-triggering mechanism in which H2O2 first inactivates a carbonyl reductase(s), allowing RCS levels to rise, and eventually leads to the activation of the C3LP activity of 20S proteasome. The carbonyl reductase thus acts as an ROS sensor for triggering PCD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
Serratia marcescens BM1 Enhances Cadmium Stress Tolerance and Phytoremediation Potential of Soybean Through Modulation of Osmolytes, Leaf Gas Exchange, Antioxidant Machinery, and Stress-Responsive Genes Expression
Antioxidants 2020, 9(1), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9010043 - 04 Jan 2020
Cited by 10
Abstract
The heavy metal contamination in plant-soil environment has increased manifold recently. In order to reduce the harmful effects of metal stress in plants, the application of beneficial soil microbes is gaining much attention. In the present research, the role of Serratia marcescens BM1 [...] Read more.
The heavy metal contamination in plant-soil environment has increased manifold recently. In order to reduce the harmful effects of metal stress in plants, the application of beneficial soil microbes is gaining much attention. In the present research, the role of Serratia marcescens BM1 in enhancing cadmium (Cd) stress tolerance and phytoremediation potential of soybean plants, was investigated. Exposure of soybean plants to two Cd doses (150 and 300 µM) significantly reduced plant growth, biomass, gas exchange attributes, nutrients uptake, antioxidant capacity, and the contents of chlorophyll, total phenolics, flavonoids, soluble sugars, and proteins. Additionally, Cd induced the stress levels of Cd, proline, glycine betaine, hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde, antioxidant enzymes (i.e., catalase, CAT; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; superoxide dismutase, SOD; peroxidise, POD), and the expression of stress-related genes (i.e., APX, CAT, Fe-SOD, POD, CHI, CHS, PHD2, VSO, NR, and P5CS) in soybean leaves. On the other hand, inoculation of Cd-stressed soybean plants with Serratia marcescens BM1 significantly enhanced the plant growth, biomass, gas exchange attributes, nutrients uptake, antioxidant capacity, and the contents of chlorophyll, total phenolics, flavonoids, soluble sugars, and proteins. Moreover, Serratia marcescens BM1 inoculation reduced the levels of cadmium and oxidative stress markers, but significantly induced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of osmolytes and stress-related genes expression in Cd-stressed plants. The application of 300 µM CdCl2 and Serratia marcescens triggered the highest expression levels of stress-related genes. Overall, this study suggests that inoculation of soybean plants with Serratia marcescens BM1 promotes phytoremediation potential and Cd stress tolerance by modulating the photosynthetic attributes, osmolytes biosynthesis, antioxidants machinery, and the expression of stress-related genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
The Ageing Process Affects the Antioxidant Defences and the Poly (ADPribosyl)ation Activity in Cistus Incanus L. Leaves
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 528; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110528 - 06 Nov 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The ageing process in living organisms is characterised by the accumulation of several deleterious changes occurring in cells and tissues. The increase of reactive oxygen species with the advancement of age is responsible for the oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA, enhancing [...] Read more.
The ageing process in living organisms is characterised by the accumulation of several deleterious changes occurring in cells and tissues. The increase of reactive oxygen species with the advancement of age is responsible for the oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA, enhancing the risk of diseases. The antioxidant response and the activation of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation process represent the first defences activated by organisms at all life stages to counteract damage to cell structures and genomic material. The regulation of poly(ADP ribosyl)ation with age is little known in plants, especially in combination with antioxidant defences modulation. In this study, the relationships between poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant pool have been studied together with the photosynthetic apparatus efficiency in the Mediterranean species Cistus incanus L., examining leaves at different developmental stages: young, mature and senescent. The photosynthetic performance was evaluated by chlorophyll a fluorescence measurement, the total soluble and fat-soluble antioxidant capacity, as well as the activities of enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), were determined by spectrophotometer, PARP activity was assessed by radioactive labelling. The highest photochemical activity was observed in young leaves, together with the highest GST activity. With the progress of the ageing process, the non-enzymatic antioxidant pool (namely ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol) declined, reaching the lowest value in senescent leaves, whereas PARP activity rose significantly. The overall results indicate that the decline of photosynthetic apparatus efficiency during senescence is due to the reduction of specific defences against oxidative damages, which increase the damages to DNA, as demonstrated by PARP activity rise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
Chitosan Upregulates the Genes of the ROS Pathway and Enhances the Antioxidant Potential of Grape (Vitis vinifera L. ‘Touriga Franca’ and ’Tinto Cão’) Tissues
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110525 - 03 Nov 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Chitosan is an environmentally-friendly active molecule that has been explored for numerous agricultural uses. Its use in crop protection is well-known, however, other properties, such as bioactivity, deserve attention. Moreover, the modes of actions of chitosan remain to be elucidated. The present study [...] Read more.
Chitosan is an environmentally-friendly active molecule that has been explored for numerous agricultural uses. Its use in crop protection is well-known, however, other properties, such as bioactivity, deserve attention. Moreover, the modes of actions of chitosan remain to be elucidated. The present study assessed the levels of total phenolic compounds, the antioxidant potential, and the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging genes in the berries (skins and seeds), leaves, cluster stems, and shoots upon chitosan application on two red grapevine varieties (Touriga Franca and Tinto Cão). The application of chitosan on the whole vine before and after veraison led to the increased levels of polyphenols, anthocyanins, and tannins in Tinto Cão berries, and polyphenols and tannins in Touriga Franca berries, respectively. CUPric Reducing Antioxidant Capacity (CUPRAC) and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assays indicated an increase in the antioxidant potential of berries. With the exception of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), all the ROS pathway genes tested, i.e., iron-superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD), copper-zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutaredoxin (Grx), respiratory burst oxidase (Rboh), amine oxidase (AO), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO), were found up-regulated in chitosan-treated berries. Results from the analyses of leaves, stems, and shoots revealed that chitosan not only induced the synthesis of phenolic compounds but also acted as a facilitator for the transfer of polyphenols from the leaves to the berries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
Short-Term Low Temperature Induces Nitro-Oxidative Stress that Deregulates the NADP-Malic Enzyme Function by Tyrosine Nitration in Arabidopsis thaliana
Antioxidants 2019, 8(10), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8100448 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Low temperature (LT) negatively affects plant growth and development via the alteration of the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). Among RNS, tyrosine nitration, the addition of an NO2 group to a tyrosine residue, can modulate reduced nicotinamide-dinucleotide [...] Read more.
Low temperature (LT) negatively affects plant growth and development via the alteration of the metabolism of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). Among RNS, tyrosine nitration, the addition of an NO2 group to a tyrosine residue, can modulate reduced nicotinamide-dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-generating systems and, therefore, can alter the levels of NADPH, a key cofactor in cellular redox homeostasis. NADPH also acts as an indispensable electron donor within a wide range of enzymatic reactions, biosynthetic pathways, and detoxification processes, which could affect plant viability. To extend our knowledge about the regulation of this key cofactor by this nitric oxide (NO)-related post-translational modification, we analyzed the effect of tyrosine nitration on another NADPH-generating enzyme, the NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), under LT stress. In Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to short-term LT (4 °C for 48 h), a 50% growth reduction accompanied by an increase in the content of superoxide, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite, in addition to diminished cytosolic NADP-ME activity, were found. In vitro assays confirmed that peroxynitrite inhibits cytosolic NADP-ME2 activity due to tyrosine nitration. The mass spectrometric analysis of nitrated NADP-ME2 enabled us to determine that Tyr-73 was exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by peroxynitrite. The in silico analysis of the Arabidopsis NADP-ME2 protein sequence suggests that Tyr73 nitration could disrupt the interactions between the specific amino acids responsible for protein structure stability. In conclusion, the present data show that short-term LT stress affects the metabolism of ROS and RNS, which appears to negatively modulate the activity of cytosolic NADP-ME through the tyrosine nitration process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
Amelioration of the Oxidative Stress Generated by Simple or Combined Abiotic Stress through the K+ and Ca2+ Supplementation in Tomato Plants
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040081 - 30 Mar 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, or salinity are major causes of yield loss worldwide due to the oxidative burst generated under these conditions. Recent studies have revealed that plant response to a combination of different environmental stressors is unique and cannot be [...] Read more.
Abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, or salinity are major causes of yield loss worldwide due to the oxidative burst generated under these conditions. Recent studies have revealed that plant response to a combination of different environmental stressors is unique and cannot be deduced from the response developed to each stress when applied individually. Some studies have demonstrated that a different management of some nutrients in the irrigation solution may provide an advantage to the plants against abiotic stressors. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate if an increase in potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+) concentration in the nutrient solution may have a positive effect on the amelioration of oxidative stress which occurs under the combination of salinity and heat in tomato plants. Our results indicated that plants irrigated with an increase in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations in the irrigation solution from 7mM (K+) to 9.8 mM and from 4 mM (Ca2+) to 5.6 mM, respectively, induced a recovery of the biomass production compared to the plants treated with salinity or salinity + heat, and subsequently irrigated with the regular Hoagland solution. This was correlated with a better performance of all the photosynthetic parameters, a reduction in the foliar concentration of H2O2 and a lower lipid peroxidation rate, and with a better performance of the antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductactase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), and NADPH oxidase. Our results showed that these enzymes were differentially regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification efficiency under salinity and under the combination of salinity and heat, as compared to those plants irrigated with common Hoagland. An increase in K+ and Ca2+ in the irrigation solution also induced a lower Na+ accumulation in leaves and a higher K+/Na+ ratio. Thus, our study highlights the importance of the right management of the plant nutritional status and fertilization in order to counteract the deleterious effects of abiotic stress in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessArticle
Bifunctional Chloroplastic DJ-1B from Arabidopsis thaliana is an Oxidation-Robust Holdase and a Glyoxalase Sensitive to H2O2
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010008 - 01 Jan 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Members of the DJ-1 protein family are multifunctional enzymes whose loss increases the susceptibility of the cell to oxidative stress. However, little is known about the function of the plant DJ-1 homologs. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of oxidation on the structure and [...] Read more.
Members of the DJ-1 protein family are multifunctional enzymes whose loss increases the susceptibility of the cell to oxidative stress. However, little is known about the function of the plant DJ-1 homologs. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of oxidation on the structure and function of chloroplastic AtDJ-1B and studied the phenotype of T-DNA lines lacking the protein. In vitro oxidation of AtDJ-1B with H2O2 lowers its glyoxalase activity, but has no effect on its holdase chaperone function. Remarkably, upon oxidation, the thermostability of AtDJ-1B increases with no significant alteration of the overall secondary structure. Moreover, we found that AtDJ-1B transcript levels are invariable, and loss of AtDJ-1B does not affect plant viability, growth and stress response. All in all, two discrete functions of AtDJ-1B respond differently to H2O2, and AtDJ-1B is not essential for plant development under stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Molecular Mechanism of Oxidation of P700 and Suppression of ROS Production in Photosystem I in Response to Electron-Sink Limitations in C3 Plants
Antioxidants 2020, 9(3), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9030230 - 11 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Photosynthesis fixes CO2 and converts it to sugar, using chemical-energy compounds of both NADPH and ATP, which are produced in the photosynthetic electron transport system. The photosynthetic electron transport system absorbs photon energy to drive electron flow from Photosystem II (PSII) to [...] Read more.
Photosynthesis fixes CO2 and converts it to sugar, using chemical-energy compounds of both NADPH and ATP, which are produced in the photosynthetic electron transport system. The photosynthetic electron transport system absorbs photon energy to drive electron flow from Photosystem II (PSII) to Photosystem I (PSI). That is, both PSII and PSI are full of electrons. O2 is easily reduced to a superoxide radical (O2) at the reducing side, i.e., the acceptor side, of PSI, which is the main production site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in photosynthetic organisms. ROS-dependent inactivation of PSI in vivo has been reported, where the electrons are accumulated at the acceptor side of PSI by artificial treatments: exposure to low temperature and repetitive short-pulse (rSP) illumination treatment, and the accumulated electrons flow to O2, producing ROS. Recently, my group found that the redox state of the reaction center of chlorophyll P700 in PSI regulates the production of ROS: P700 oxidation suppresses the production of O2 and prevents PSI inactivation. This is why P700 in PSI is oxidized upon the exposure of photosynthesis organisms to higher light intensity and/or low CO2 conditions, where photosynthesis efficiency decreases. In this study, I introduce a new molecular mechanism for the oxidation of P700 in PSI and suppression of ROS production from the robust relationship between the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. The accumulated protons in the lumenal space of the thylakoid membrane and the accumulated electrons in the plastoquinone (PQ) pool drive the rate-determining step of the P700 photo-oxidation reduction cycle in PSI from the photo-excited P700 oxidation to the reduction of the oxidized P700, thereby enhancing P700 oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessReview
Regulation of Ascorbate-Glutathione Pathway in Mitigating Oxidative Damage in Plants under Abiotic Stress
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090384 - 09 Sep 2019
Cited by 22
Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is a usual phenomenon in a plant both under a normal and stressed condition. However, under unfavorable or adverse conditions, ROS production exceeds the capacity of the antioxidant defense system. Both non-enzymatic and enzymatic components of the antioxidant [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is a usual phenomenon in a plant both under a normal and stressed condition. However, under unfavorable or adverse conditions, ROS production exceeds the capacity of the antioxidant defense system. Both non-enzymatic and enzymatic components of the antioxidant defense system either detoxify or scavenge ROS and mitigate their deleterious effects. The Ascorbate-Glutathione (AsA-GSH) pathway, also known as Asada–Halliwell pathway comprises of AsA, GSH, and four enzymes viz. ascorbate peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and glutathione reductase, play a vital role in detoxifying ROS. Apart from ROS detoxification, they also interact with other defense systems in plants and protect the plants from various abiotic stress-induced damages. Several plant studies revealed that the upregulation or overexpression of AsA-GSH pathway enzymes and the enhancement of the AsA and GSH levels conferred plants better tolerance to abiotic stresses by reducing the ROS. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the research on AsA-GSH pathway in terms of oxidative stress tolerance in plants. We also focus on the defense mechanisms as well as molecular interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessReview
On the Origin and Fate of Reactive Oxygen Species in Plant Cell Compartments
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040105 - 17 Apr 2019
Cited by 12
Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as important signaling compounds of major importance in a number of developmental and physiological processes in plants. The existence of cellular compartments enables efficient redox compartmentalization and ensures proper functioning of ROS-dependent signaling pathways. Similar to [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as important signaling compounds of major importance in a number of developmental and physiological processes in plants. The existence of cellular compartments enables efficient redox compartmentalization and ensures proper functioning of ROS-dependent signaling pathways. Similar to other organisms, the production of individual ROS in plant cells is highly localized and regulated by compartment-specific enzyme pathways on transcriptional and post-translational level. ROS metabolism and signaling in specific compartments are greatly affected by their chemical interactions with other reactive radical species, ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes. A dysregulation of the redox status, as a consequence of induced ROS generation or decreased capacity of their removal, occurs in plants exposed to diverse stress conditions. During stress condition, strong induction of ROS-generating systems or attenuated ROS scavenging can lead to oxidative or nitrosative stress conditions, associated with potential damaging modifications of cell biomolecules. Here, we present an overview of compartment-specific pathways of ROS production and degradation and mechanisms of ROS homeostasis control within plant cell compartments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Open AccessReview
The Role of the Plant Antioxidant System in Drought Tolerance
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040094 - 08 Apr 2019
Cited by 35
Abstract
Water deficiency compromises plant performance and yield in many habitats and in agriculture. In addition to survival of the acute drought stress period which depends on plant-genotype-specific characteristics, stress intensity and duration, also the speed and efficiency of recovery determine plant performance. Drought-induced [...] Read more.
Water deficiency compromises plant performance and yield in many habitats and in agriculture. In addition to survival of the acute drought stress period which depends on plant-genotype-specific characteristics, stress intensity and duration, also the speed and efficiency of recovery determine plant performance. Drought-induced deregulation of metabolism enhances generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which in turn affect the redox regulatory state of the cell. Strong correlative and analytical evidence assigns a major role in drought tolerance to the redox regulatory and antioxidant system. This review compiles current knowledge on the response and function of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide under drought stress in various species and drought stress regimes. The meta-analysis of reported changes in transcript and protein amounts, and activities of components of the antioxidant and redox network support the tentative conclusion that drought tolerance is more tightly linked to up-regulated ascorbate-dependent antioxidant activity than to the response of the thiol-redox regulatory network. The significance of the antioxidant system in surviving severe phases of dehydration is further supported by the strong antioxidant system usually encountered in resurrection plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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Other

Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Biswas, M.S. et al. Inactivation of Carbonyl-Detoxifying Enzymes by H2O2 Is a Trigger to Increase Carbonyl Load for Initiating Programmed Cell Death in Plants. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 141
Antioxidants 2020, 9(4), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9040289 - 31 Mar 2020
Abstract
The author wishes to make the following correction to this paper [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
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