Special Issue "Oxidative Stress in Plant"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "ROS, RNS and RSS".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Juan B. Barroso

Department of Experimental Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, nitro fatty acids, Post-translational modifications, S-nitrosylation, nitration, protein oxidation, nitroalkylation, abiotic stress, plant immunity, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress.
Guest Editor
Dr. Mounira Chaki

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, signalling, nitrolipids, nitration, S-nitrosylation, nitroalkylation, biotic and abiotic stresses, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress
Guest Editor
Dr. Juan C. Begara-Morales

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universidad de Jaen, Jaen, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species, reactive oxygen species, antioxidants, nitro fatty acids, S-nitrosylation, nitration, protein oxidation, nitroalkylation, abiotic stress, plant immunity, oxidative stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants are exposed to different biotic and abiotic stresses leading to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are highly toxic and could cause impairment to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids that finally results in an oxidative stress. Excessive concentrations of ROS are strictly regulated by ROS scavenging pathways such as efficient enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defence systems that protect plant cells from oxidative stress damage. Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduce oxidative stress in plants. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals have emerged as the main ROS playing a key role as secondary messengers by regulating diverse function in plants; however its accumulation at high levels causes oxidative damage leading to cell death. Over the past decades significant progresses have been made to understand the role of ROS and its signalling behaviour in plants under stress.

This Special Issue aims to publish original research papers and reviews on aspects of oxidative stress in plants under different stress conditions. The topics covered in this issue will include ROS production and scavenging, ROS signalling in plants, involvement of ROS in cell death, and the role of plants enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants under stress conditions.

Dr. Juan B. Barroso
Dr. Mounira Chaki
Dr. Juan C. Begara-Morales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oxidative stress
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Superoxide radical
  • Hydrogen sulfide
  • Antioxidant systems
  • Signalling
  • Biotic stress
  • Abiotic stress

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Amelioration of the Oxidative Stress Generated by Simple or Combined Abiotic Stress through the K+ and Ca2+ Supplementation in Tomato Plants
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040081
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 30 March 2019
PDF Full-text (4982 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, or salinity are major causes of yield loss worldwide due to the oxidative burst generated under these conditions. Recent studies have revealed that plant response to a combination of different environmental stressors is unique and cannot be [...] Read more.
Abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, or salinity are major causes of yield loss worldwide due to the oxidative burst generated under these conditions. Recent studies have revealed that plant response to a combination of different environmental stressors is unique and cannot be deduced from the response developed to each stress when applied individually. Some studies have demonstrated that a different management of some nutrients in the irrigation solution may provide an advantage to the plants against abiotic stressors. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate if an increase in potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+) concentration in the nutrient solution may have a positive effect on the amelioration of oxidative stress which occurs under the combination of salinity and heat in tomato plants. Our results indicated that plants irrigated with an increase in K+ and Ca2+ concentrations in the irrigation solution from 7mM (K+) to 9.8 mM and from 4 mM (Ca2+) to 5.6 mM, respectively, induced a recovery of the biomass production compared to the plants treated with salinity or salinity + heat, and subsequently irrigated with the regular Hoagland solution. This was correlated with a better performance of all the photosynthetic parameters, a reduction in the foliar concentration of H2O2 and a lower lipid peroxidation rate, and with a better performance of the antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductactase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), and NADPH oxidase. Our results showed that these enzymes were differentially regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification efficiency under salinity and under the combination of salinity and heat, as compared to those plants irrigated with common Hoagland. An increase in K+ and Ca2+ in the irrigation solution also induced a lower Na+ accumulation in leaves and a higher K+/Na+ ratio. Thus, our study highlights the importance of the right management of the plant nutritional status and fertilization in order to counteract the deleterious effects of abiotic stress in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Bifunctional Chloroplastic DJ-1B from Arabidopsis thaliana is an Oxidation-Robust Holdase and a Glyoxalase Sensitive to H2O2
Antioxidants 2019, 8(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8010008
Received: 25 November 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 22 December 2018 / Published: 1 January 2019
PDF Full-text (3990 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Members of the DJ-1 protein family are multifunctional enzymes whose loss increases the susceptibility of the cell to oxidative stress. However, little is known about the function of the plant DJ-1 homologs. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of oxidation on the structure and [...] Read more.
Members of the DJ-1 protein family are multifunctional enzymes whose loss increases the susceptibility of the cell to oxidative stress. However, little is known about the function of the plant DJ-1 homologs. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of oxidation on the structure and function of chloroplastic AtDJ-1B and studied the phenotype of T-DNA lines lacking the protein. In vitro oxidation of AtDJ-1B with H2O2 lowers its glyoxalase activity, but has no effect on its holdase chaperone function. Remarkably, upon oxidation, the thermostability of AtDJ-1B increases with no significant alteration of the overall secondary structure. Moreover, we found that AtDJ-1B transcript levels are invariable, and loss of AtDJ-1B does not affect plant viability, growth and stress response. All in all, two discrete functions of AtDJ-1B respond differently to H2O2, and AtDJ-1B is not essential for plant development under stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
On the Origin and Fate of Reactive Oxygen Species in Plant Cell Compartments
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040105
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 31 March 2019 / Accepted: 13 April 2019 / Published: 17 April 2019
PDF Full-text (829 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as important signaling compounds of major importance in a number of developmental and physiological processes in plants. The existence of cellular compartments enables efficient redox compartmentalization and ensures proper functioning of ROS-dependent signaling pathways. Similar to [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as important signaling compounds of major importance in a number of developmental and physiological processes in plants. The existence of cellular compartments enables efficient redox compartmentalization and ensures proper functioning of ROS-dependent signaling pathways. Similar to other organisms, the production of individual ROS in plant cells is highly localized and regulated by compartment-specific enzyme pathways on transcriptional and post-translational level. ROS metabolism and signaling in specific compartments are greatly affected by their chemical interactions with other reactive radical species, ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes. A dysregulation of the redox status, as a consequence of induced ROS generation or decreased capacity of their removal, occurs in plants exposed to diverse stress conditions. During stress condition, strong induction of ROS-generating systems or attenuated ROS scavenging can lead to oxidative or nitrosative stress conditions, associated with potential damaging modifications of cell biomolecules. Here, we present an overview of compartment-specific pathways of ROS production and degradation and mechanisms of ROS homeostasis control within plant cell compartments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
The Role of the Plant Antioxidant System in Drought Tolerance
Antioxidants 2019, 8(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8040094
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 30 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6642 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Water deficiency compromises plant performance and yield in many habitats and in agriculture. In addition to survival of the acute drought stress period which depends on plant-genotype-specific characteristics, stress intensity and duration, also the speed and efficiency of recovery determine plant performance. Drought-induced [...] Read more.
Water deficiency compromises plant performance and yield in many habitats and in agriculture. In addition to survival of the acute drought stress period which depends on plant-genotype-specific characteristics, stress intensity and duration, also the speed and efficiency of recovery determine plant performance. Drought-induced deregulation of metabolism enhances generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which in turn affect the redox regulatory state of the cell. Strong correlative and analytical evidence assigns a major role in drought tolerance to the redox regulatory and antioxidant system. This review compiles current knowledge on the response and function of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide under drought stress in various species and drought stress regimes. The meta-analysis of reported changes in transcript and protein amounts, and activities of components of the antioxidant and redox network support the tentative conclusion that drought tolerance is more tightly linked to up-regulated ascorbate-dependent antioxidant activity than to the response of the thiol-redox regulatory network. The significance of the antioxidant system in surviving severe phases of dehydration is further supported by the strong antioxidant system usually encountered in resurrection plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Plant)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Dr. Jehad Shaikhali  

[email protected] 

Redox regulation of the mediator complex in plants in response to stress and development

Antioxidants EISSN 2076-3921 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top