Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2022) | Viewed by 19521

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Unit of Plastic Surgery, P. Valdoni Department of Surgery, Umberto I Polyclinic Hospital, Sapienza University, 00161 Rome, Italy
Interests: dermatological diseases; cardiovascular disease; oxidative stress
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin is the largest organ in the human body, and its main functions are to regulate moisture content and temperature within the body, provide protection from external microorganisms, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals, etc.

Oxidative stress (OS) is an intrinsic part of skin metabolism. In the skin, under normal conditions, small amounts of reactive oxidative species (ROS) are produced, which contribute to processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and cell apoptosis. The main exogenous factors that increase the production of ROS in the skin are ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke, various pollutants, exposure to different microorganisms, etc. Inflammatory processes and psychological stress are part of the endogenous factors that can lead to an altered balance between prooxidants and antioxidants. In this context, antioxidant systems play a defining role in counteracting the effects of oxidative stress. In the skin, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants are involved in the defense against ROSs. The level and activity of antioxidant agents are higher in the epidermis compared to the dermis. In the skin, the accumulation of ROS leads to the development of a chronic inflammatory process, fragmentation, and disorganization of collagen fibers, resulting in significant alterations in the functional status of the cell, changes that can underlie in some cases the development of a malignant process. High levels of ROS in the skin cause erythema, edema, and pain. In the development of skin diseases, oxidative stress may play the role of an initiator of the pathogenic processes responsible for the appearance of the disease or may be the result of the activity of inflammatory cells involved in pathogenesis.

For this purpose, we invite you to submit your latest research findings or a review article to this Special Issue, which will bring together current research concerning the linkage between OS and dermatological diseases. We welcome submissions concerning both basic research and clinical studies. We believe that this Special Issue on “Role of Oxidative Stress in Dermatological Diseases” will help to highlight the most recent advances on all aspects of this topic.

We look forward to your expert contribution and send our kindest regards. 

Dr. Pasquale Fino
Prof. Dr. Roberto Carnevale
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • antioxidant treatment
  • oxidative stress
  • autophagy
  • clinical studies
  • in vitro study and antioxidant treatment

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 2724 KiB  
Article
Ferroptosis Activation Contributes to the Formation of Skin Lesions in Psoriasis Vulgaris
by Siying Li, Xin Luo, Suhan Zhang, Yuwen Su, Min Deng, Yanshan Zhu, Peng Zhang, Ruifang Wu and Ming Zhao
Antioxidants 2023, 12(2), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12020310 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
(1) Background: Ferroptosis is a newly coined form of programmed cell death marked by lethal accumulation of lipid peroxidation and ferrous iron overload. A few studies on the specific mechanism of ferroptosis in the genesis and development of psoriasis are available. (2) Methods: [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Ferroptosis is a newly coined form of programmed cell death marked by lethal accumulation of lipid peroxidation and ferrous iron overload. A few studies on the specific mechanism of ferroptosis in the genesis and development of psoriasis are available. (2) Methods: Levels of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ferrous iron were measured by flow cytometry. Ultrastructure analysis was performed by transmission electron microscopy. Imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like mice were treated with a ferroptosis inducer. The expressions of mRNA of genes were measured by qRT-PCR. HaCaT cells were used to explore the function of Cyb561d2. (3) Results: In this work, we observed that levels of lipid ROS and ferrous iron in the epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris (PV) patients were increased. The existence of ferroptosis activation in the epidermis of individuals with PV was confirmed by transmission electron microscope both in patients with PV and psoriasis-like mice models. Intradermal injection of the ferroptosis inducer RSL3 in psoriasis-like mice significantly promoted and aggravated the development of psoriasis-like dermatitis, and the level of serum transferrin was also increased in PV samples. Moreover, abnormal expression of some genes related to iron metabolism was also proved in the epidermis of PV cases, among which Cyb561d2 was shown to promote ferrous iron overload and lipid peroxidation accumulation in HaCaT cells. (4) Conclusions: In summary, our study suggested that ferroptosis activation owing to iron overload may be a novel mechanism underlying the formation of skin lesions in individuals with PV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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17 pages, 3189 KiB  
Article
Protective Effect of the Hydrophilic Extract of Polypodium leucotomos, Fernblock®, against the Synergistic Action of UVA Radiation and Benzo[a]pyrene Pollutant
by María Gallego-Rentero, Jimena Nicolás-Morala, Miguel Alonso-Juarranz, Elisa Carrasco, Mikel Portillo-Esnaola, Azahara Rodríguez-Luna and Salvador González
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2185; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112185 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
Oxidative stress is a harmful effect induced on the skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) air pollutants. This effect is amplified by the additive damaging effect of the sun, especially through the UVA light component. Besides being one of the [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress is a harmful effect induced on the skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) air pollutants. This effect is amplified by the additive damaging effect of the sun, especially through the UVA light component. Besides being one of the main compounds that make up air pollution, BaP can also be found in tar, tobacco smoke, and various foods. In addition to its direct carcinogenic potential, BaP can act as a photosensitizer absorbing sunlight in the UVA range and thus generating ROS and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Fernblock® (FB) is an aqueous extract from the leaves of Polypodium leucotomos that has been proven to exert photoprotective and antioxidant effects on skin cells. In this study, we evaluate the potential of FB to prevent the damage induced by a combination of BaP and UVA light on human keratinocyte and mouse melanocyte cell lines (HaCaT and B16-F10, respectively). In particular, we have analyzed the capacity of FB to counteract the alterations caused on cellular morphology, viability, oxidative stress and melanogenic signaling pathway activation. Our data indicate that FB prevented cell damage and reduced oxidative stress and melanogenic signaling pathway activation caused by a combination of BaP and UVA light irradiation. Altogether, our findings support the fact that FB is able to prevent skin damage caused by the exposure to a combination of UVA and the air pollutant BaP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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13 pages, 561 KiB  
Article
The Role of Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis and Chronic Urticaria
by Sabina Galiniak, Mateusz Mołoń, Marek Biesiadecki, Agnieszka Bożek and Marta Rachel
Antioxidants 2022, 11(8), 1590; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11081590 - 16 Aug 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2691
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and chronic urticaria (CU) are common skin diseases with an increasing prevalence and pathogenesis that are not fully understood. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in AD and CU. The aim of the single-center cross-sectional study was [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) and chronic urticaria (CU) are common skin diseases with an increasing prevalence and pathogenesis that are not fully understood. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in AD and CU. The aim of the single-center cross-sectional study was to compare markers of oxidative stress in 21 patients with AD, and 19 CU patients. The products of protein oxidation, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and markers of lipid peroxidation were estimated in the serum. AD patients had a higher level of advanced protein oxidation products and a lower level of thiol groups than healthy participants. However, CU patients had statistically higher levels of AOPP and 3-nitrotyrosine than healthy subjects. The level of thiol groups and serum TAC decreased significantly in patients with CU. There was no difference in serum concentration of lipid peroxidation products, Amadori products, ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, and ability of albumin to binding cobalt between AD or CU patients compared to healthy subjects. We found a moderate positive significant correlation between AOPP and age in patients with AD. In patients with CU, TAC was negatively correlated with age. These results may shed light on the etiopathogenesis of AD or CU, and confirm an oxidative burden in these patients. Furthermore, our study could be useful in developing new therapeutic methods that include using antioxidants in dermatological diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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15 pages, 2830 KiB  
Article
Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Acne Effects of Hamamelis virginiana Bark in Human Keratinocytes
by Stefano Piazza, Giulia Martinelli, Urska Vrhovsek, Domenico Masuero, Marco Fumagalli, Andrea Magnavacca, Carola Pozzoli, Luisa Canilli, Massimo Terno, Marco Angarano, Mario Dell’Agli and Enrico Sangiovanni
Antioxidants 2022, 11(6), 1119; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11061119 - 5 Jun 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5024
Abstract
Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes) is recognized as one of the main triggers of the cutaneous inflammatory response in acne vulgaris, a chronic skin disorder with a multifactorial origin. Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana L.) is a plant widely used for skin [...] Read more.
Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes) is recognized as one of the main triggers of the cutaneous inflammatory response in acne vulgaris, a chronic skin disorder with a multifactorial origin. Witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana L.) is a plant widely used for skin inflammatory conditions, with some preliminary anti-inflammatory evidence on the skin, but lacking data on acne conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a glycolic extract from Hamamelis virginiana bark (HVE) versus C. acnes-induced inflammation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Phytochemical investigations of HVE identified hamamelitannin (HT) and proanthocyanidins as the most abundant compounds (respectively, 0.29% and 0.30% w/wextract). HVE inhibited C. acnes-induced IL-6 release (IC50: 136.90 μg/mL), by partially impairing NF-κB activation; however, no antibacterial or antibiofilm activities were found. In addition, HVE showed greater anti-inflammatory activity when TNF-α was used as a proinflammatory stimulus (IC50 of 38.93 μg/mL for IL-8 release), partially acting by antioxidant mechanisms, as shown for VEGF inhibition. The effects of HVE are primarily based on the proanthocyanidin content, as HT was found inactive on all the parameters tested. These results suggest further investigations of HVE in other inflammatory-based skin diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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Review

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22 pages, 1134 KiB  
Review
Microbiota, Oxidative Stress, and Skin Cancer: An Unexpected Triangle
by Barbara Azzimonti, Chiara Ballacchino, Paola Zanetta, Marie Angele Cucci, Chiara Monge, Margherita Grattarola, Chiara Dianzani, Giuseppina Barrera and Stefania Pizzimenti
Antioxidants 2023, 12(3), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12030546 - 21 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3780
Abstract
Mounting evidence indicates that the microbiota, the unique combination of micro-organisms residing in a specific environment, plays an essential role in the development of a wide range of human diseases, including skin cancer. Moreover, a persistent imbalance of microbial community, named dysbiosis, can [...] Read more.
Mounting evidence indicates that the microbiota, the unique combination of micro-organisms residing in a specific environment, plays an essential role in the development of a wide range of human diseases, including skin cancer. Moreover, a persistent imbalance of microbial community, named dysbiosis, can also be associated with oxidative stress, a well-known emerging force involved in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cutaneous malignancies. Although their interplay has been somewhat suggested, the connection between microbiota, oxidative stress, and skin cancer is a largely unexplored field. In the present review, we discuss the current knowledge on these topics, suggesting potential therapeutic strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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18 pages, 752 KiB  
Review
The Role of KEAP1-NRF2 System in Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis
by Tatsuya Ogawa and Yosuke Ishitsuka
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1397; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071397 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3100
Abstract
The Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with cap‘n’collar homology-associated protein 1 (KEAP1)-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2) system, a thiol-based sensor-effector apparatus, exerts antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects and maintains skin homeostasis. Thus, NRF2 activation appears to be a promising treatment option for various skin [...] Read more.
The Kelch-like erythroid cell-derived protein with cap‘n’collar homology-associated protein 1 (KEAP1)-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2) system, a thiol-based sensor-effector apparatus, exerts antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects and maintains skin homeostasis. Thus, NRF2 activation appears to be a promising treatment option for various skin diseases. However, NRF2-mediated defense responses may deteriorate skin inflammation in a context-dependent manner. Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are two common chronic inflammatory skin diseases caused by a defective skin barrier, dysregulated immune responses, genetic predispositions, and environmental factors. This review focuses on the role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in the pathophysiology of AD and psoriasis and the therapeutic approaches that utilize this system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Oxidative Stress in the Dermatological Diseases)
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