Special Issue "Delivery of Gaseous Signal Molecules"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "ROS, RNS and RSS".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Urara Hasegawa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA
Interests: Polymeric micelles; Gaseous signal molecules; Drug delivery system; Stimuli-responsive biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gaseous signal molecules such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and other gaseous molecules are produced in almost all tissues in the body and exert regulatory functions in various physiological and pathological processes. Despite the biological significance of these gases, the mechanisms of their biological actions are largely unknown and their therapeutic potential has not been well explored. This is partially due to the lack of gas delivery technologies, which mimics the endogenous production of these gaseous signal molecules in the body. These gases share several challenging characteristics such as high volatility, rapid diffusion, short half-lives under physiological conditions as well as complex dose-dependent biological activities. Therefore, there is a need to develop gas delivery systems that enable to deliver controlled amount of gaseous signal molecules for a specific period of time to target cells and tissues. 

This Special Issue welcomes original research papers and reviews focusing on gas delivery technologies, such as small gas donor compounds, biomaterials and medical devices, to expand our understanding of biological roles of gaseous signal molecules as well as to explore their therapeutic potential, which will lead to innovative approaches for the prevention and treatment of a wide variety of diseases.

Dr. Urara Hasegawa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nitric oxide
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Hydrogen sulfide
  • Gas donor compounds
  • Nanoparticles
  • Biomaterials
  • Medical devices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Inhibitory Effects of Slow-Releasing Hydrogen Sulfide Donors in the Mechanical Allodynia, Grip Strength Deficits, and Depressive-Like Behaviors Associated with Chronic Osteoarthritis Pain
Antioxidants 2020, 9(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9010031 - 29 Dec 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Osteoarthritis and its associated comorbidities are important clinical problems that have a negative impact on the quality of life, and its treatment remains unresolved. We investigated whether the systemic administration of slow-releasing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors, allyl isothiocyanate (A-ITC) and phenyl [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis and its associated comorbidities are important clinical problems that have a negative impact on the quality of life, and its treatment remains unresolved. We investigated whether the systemic administration of slow-releasing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors, allyl isothiocyanate (A-ITC) and phenyl isothiocyanate (P-ITC), alleviates chronic osteoarthritis pain and the associated emotional disorders. In C57BL/6 female mice with osteoarthritis pain induced by the intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate, we evaluated the effects of repeated administration of A-ITC and P-ITC on the (i) mechanical allodynia and grip strength deficits; (ii) emotional conducts; and (iii) glial activity and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), and antioxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase 1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, glutathione S-transferase mu 1 and alpha 1) in the hippocampus. The administration of A-ITC and P-ITC inhibited the mechanical allodynia, the grip strength deficits, and the depressive-like behaviors accompanying osteoarthritis. Both treatments inhibited microglial activation, normalized the upregulation of NOS2 and PI3K/p-Akt, and maintained high levels of antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes in the hippocampus. Data suggest that treatment with low doses of slow-releasing H2S donors might be an interesting strategy for the treatment of nociception, functional disability, and emotional disorders associated with osteoarthritis pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivery of Gaseous Signal Molecules)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nitric Oxide Nano-Delivery Systems for Cancer Therapeutics: Advances and Challenges
Antioxidants 2020, 9(9), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9090791 - 26 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in various physiological and pathological functions and processes in the human body. Therapeutic application of NO molecules has been investigated in various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infections. However, the extremely short half-life of NO, which [...] Read more.
Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in various physiological and pathological functions and processes in the human body. Therapeutic application of NO molecules has been investigated in various diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infections. However, the extremely short half-life of NO, which limits its clinical use considerably, along with non-specific distribution, has resulted in a low therapeutic index and undesired adverse effects. To overcome the drawbacks of using this gaseous signaling molecule, researchers in the last several decades have focused on innovative medical technologies, specifically nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems (DDSs), because these systems alter the biodistribution of the therapeutic agent through controlled release at the target tissues, resulting in a significant therapeutic drug effect. Thus, the application of nano-systems for NO delivery in the field of biomedicine, particularly in the development of new drugs for cancer treatment, has been increasing worldwide. In this review, we discuss NO delivery nanoparticle systems, with the aim of improving drug delivery development for conventional chemotherapies and controlling multidrug resistance in cancer treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivery of Gaseous Signal Molecules)
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Open AccessReview
Nitric Oxide-Releasing Polymeric Materials for Antimicrobial Applications: A Review
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110556 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 9
Abstract
Polymeric materials releasing nitric oxide have attracted significant attention for therapeutic use in recent years. As one of the gaseous signaling agents in eukaryotic cells, endogenously generated nitric oxide (NO) is also capable of regulating the behavior of bacteria as well as biofilm [...] Read more.
Polymeric materials releasing nitric oxide have attracted significant attention for therapeutic use in recent years. As one of the gaseous signaling agents in eukaryotic cells, endogenously generated nitric oxide (NO) is also capable of regulating the behavior of bacteria as well as biofilm formation in many metabolic pathways. To overcome the drawbacks caused by the radical nature of NO, synthetic or natural polymers bearing NO releasing moiety have been prepared as nano-sized materials, coatings, and hydrogels. To successfully design these materials, the amount of NO released within a certain duration, the targeted pathogens and the trigger mechanisms upon external stimulation with light, temperature, and chemicals should be taken into consideration. Meanwhile, NO donors like S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) and N-diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) have been widely utilized for developing antimicrobial polymeric agents through polymer-NO donor conjugation or physical encapsulation. In addition, antimicrobial materials with visible light responsive NO donor are also reported as strong and physiological friendly tools for rapid bacterial clearance. This review highlights approaches to delivery NO from different types of polymeric materials for combating diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, which hopefully can inspire researchers facing common challenges in the coming ‘post-antibiotic’ era. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Delivery of Gaseous Signal Molecules)
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