Special Issue "CoQ10 in Longevity"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Guillermo López Lluch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology, Pablo de Olavide University -CSIC-Junta de Andalucia, Sevilla, Spain
Interests: aging; metabolism; antioxidants; calorie restriction; physical activity; exercise; neurodegeneration; muscle; liver; immunology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is essential in cell metabolism and antioxidant protection in organisms. It has been associated with aging progression. Decrease in the levels of CoQ during aging has been suggested in many models and also in humans. Further, the redox ratio between reduced and oxidized form has been also associated with aging in humans. However, their role in aging and longevity is not completely clear. Being an essential component of aerobic metabolism in all the organisms and being a key component in membrane antioxidant system and in cholesterol oxidation protection, maintenance of CoQ levels can be related with longevity and with the progression of aging-related diseases. In this Special Issue we want to highlight the importance of CoQ in longevity and its role in the progression of aging-related diseases. Contributions including reviews about the importance of this essential factor are welcome.

Dr. Guillermo López Lluch
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coenzyme Q
  • Longevity
  • Aging
  • Metabolism
  • Mitochondria
  • Cholesterol
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Sarcopenia
  • Inmunosenescence
  • Model organisms

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
The Important Role of CoQ10 in Aging
Antioxidants 2019, 8(12), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8120570 - 20 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 854
Abstract
Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential lipid present in all cell membranes [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Co-Enzyme Q10 Supplementation Rescues Cumulus Cells Dysfunction in a Maternal Aging Model
Antioxidants 2019, 8(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8030058 - 08 Mar 2019
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2017
Abstract
Over the past four decades, due to cultural and social changes, women in the developed world have significantly delayed childbirth. This trend is even worse for patients who attend infertility clinics. It is well-known that live birth rates in women older than 35 [...] Read more.
Over the past four decades, due to cultural and social changes, women in the developed world have significantly delayed childbirth. This trend is even worse for patients who attend infertility clinics. It is well-known that live birth rates in women older than 35 are significantly lower than in those younger, both naturally and with assisted reproduction. Fertility decline is, in part, due to an increase in oocyte aneuploidy that leads to a reduced embryo quality, as well as an increased incidence of miscarriages and birth defects. Here we show that aging-associated malfunction is not restricted to the oocyte, as cumulus granulosa cells also display a series of defects linked to mitochondrial activity. In, both, human and mouse model, a decline in cumulus cell function due to increased maternal age is accompanied by a decreased expression of enzymes responsible for Coenzyme Q (CoQ) production, particularly Pdss2 and CoQ6. In an aged mouse model supplementation with Coenzyme Q10—a potent stimulator of mitochondrial function—restored cumulus cell number, stimulated glucose uptake, and increased progesterone production. CoQ10 supplementation might, thus, improve oocyte and cumulus cells quantity and quality, by improving the mitochondrial metabolism in females of advanced maternal age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)
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Open AccessArticle
CoQ10 Supplementation in Patients Undergoing IVF-ET: The Relationship with Follicular Fluid Content and Oocyte Maturity
Antioxidants 2018, 7(10), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7100141 - 13 Oct 2018
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2315
Abstract
Background: The target of the reduced fecundity with aging is the oocyte. The follicular fluid and its components are strongly linked with the environment of the maturing oocyte. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CoQ10 bioavailability in follicular fluids after [...] Read more.
Background: The target of the reduced fecundity with aging is the oocyte. The follicular fluid and its components are strongly linked with the environment of the maturing oocyte. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CoQ10 bioavailability in follicular fluids after oral supplementation and its possible implication in oocyte maturation. Methods: Fifteen female partners of infertile couples, aged 31–46, undergoing IVF-ET and taking 200 mg/day oral CoQ10 were compared to unsupplemented patients. CoQ10 content, its oxidative status and total antioxidant capacity were evaluated also in relation to oocyte maturation indexes. Results: CoQ10 supplementation produced a significant increase in follicular content and a significant improvement of its oxidative status. Follicular fluid total antioxidant capacity highlighted a significant decrease in patients supplemented with CoQ10, specially in women >35 years. CoQ10 supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in total antioxidant capacity of fluid from follicles containing mature oocyte, moreover CoQ10 oxidative status was also significantly reduced but in follicles containing immature oocyte. Conclusions: Our observation leads to the hypothesis that the oral supplementation of CoQ10 may improve follicular fluid oxidative metabolism and oocyte quality, specially in over 35-year-old women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)
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Open AccessArticle
Coenzyme Q10 Modulates Remodeling Possibly by Decreasing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome
Antioxidants 2018, 7(8), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7080099 - 25 Jul 2018
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1519
Abstract
The study aims to examine the effects of coenzyme Q10, (a bioenergetic antioxidant), on the indexes of left ventricular remodeling, oxidative damage, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with left ventricular dysfunction. In a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel [...] Read more.
The study aims to examine the effects of coenzyme Q10, (a bioenergetic antioxidant), on the indexes of left ventricular remodeling, oxidative damage, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with left ventricular dysfunction. In a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group study (a retrospective analysis of an earlier trial) in 55 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <50% after AMI, the effects of coenzyme Q10 (120 mg/day) or placebo were studied for 24 weeks. Two-dimensional echocardiography was performed at discharge, (approximately 5–10 days after admission) and at 6 months after AMI. The results revealed that wall thickness opposite the site of infarction decreased from (mean ± standard deviation (SD)) 12.2 ± 2.0 mm to 10.0 ± 1.8 mm with coenzyme Q10 compared with 12.8 ± 2.2 mm to 13.3 ± 2.3 mm with placebo (p < 0.01). Left ventricular mass changed from 236 ± 72 g to 213 ± 61 g with coenzyme Q10 compared with 230 ± 77 g to 255 ± 86 g with placebo (p < 0.01). Treatment with coenzyme Q10 also prevented alteration of sphericity index which is a ratio of the long and short axis of the left ventricle (which changed from 1.61 ± 0.28 to 1.63 ± 0.30 with coenzyme Q10 compared with 1.61 ± 0.32 to 1.41 ± 0.31 with placebo (p < 0.05)). Coenzyme Q10 also prevented alteration of the wall thickening abnormality at the infarct site, which changed from 9.4 ± 3.0 cm2 to 9.1 ± 2.8 cm2 compared with 10.1 ± 3.1 to 13.7 ± 4.2 cm2 with placebo (p < 0.05). End diastolic and systolic volumes also showed significant reduction with coenzyme Q10 compared to placebo. The serum level of ACE showed significant decline in the coenzyme Q10 group compared to the control group. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 early after AMI causes attenuation of left ventricular remodeling and decreases the serum ACE level in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Water-soluble CoQ10 as A Promising Anti-aging Agent for Neurological Dysfunction in Brain Mitochondria
Antioxidants 2019, 8(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8030061 - 11 Mar 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1863
Abstract
Mitochondrial function has been closely associated with normal aging and age-related diseases. Age-associated declines in mitochondrial function, such as changes in oxygen consumption rate, cytochrome c oxidase activity of complex IV, and mitochondrial coenzyme Q (CoQ) levels, begin as early as 12 to [...] Read more.
Mitochondrial function has been closely associated with normal aging and age-related diseases. Age-associated declines in mitochondrial function, such as changes in oxygen consumption rate, cytochrome c oxidase activity of complex IV, and mitochondrial coenzyme Q (CoQ) levels, begin as early as 12 to 15 months of age in male mouse brains. Brain mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by increased accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in the motor cortex and impairment of motor activities, which are similar characteristics of Parkinson’s disease. However, these age-associated defects are completely rescued by the administration of exogenous CoQ10 to middle-aged mice via its water solubilization by emulsification in drinking water. Further efforts to develop strategies to enhance the biological availability of CoQ10 to successfully ameliorate age-related brain mitochondrial dysfunction or neurodegenerative disorders may provide a promising anti-aging agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)
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Open AccessReview
Coenzyme Q10 and Degenerative Disorders Affecting Longevity: An Overview
Antioxidants 2019, 8(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8020044 - 16 Feb 2019
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 3021
Abstract
Longevity is determined by a number of factors, including genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors. A major factor affecting longevity is the development of degenerative disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease and liver disease, particularly where these occur as co-morbidities. In this [...] Read more.
Longevity is determined by a number of factors, including genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors. A major factor affecting longevity is the development of degenerative disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease and liver disease, particularly where these occur as co-morbidities. In this article, we review the potential role of supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for the prevention or management of these disorders. Thus, randomised controlled clinical trials have shown supplementation with CoQ10 or CoQ10 plus selenium reduces mortality by approximately 50% in patients with cardiovascular disease, or in the normal elderly population, respectively. Similarly, CoQ10 supplementation improves glycaemic control and vascular dysfunction in type II diabetes, improves renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease, and reduces liver inflammation in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The beneficial role of supplemental CoQ10 in the above disorders is considered to result from a combination of its roles in cellular energy generation, as an antioxidant and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CoQ10 in Longevity)
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