Special Issue "Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Michał Swieca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Interests: Low-processed food; pro-health properties; pre- and postharvest treatments; food storage; interaction of bioactive compounds; bioaccessibility; functional foods; food enzymology; food fortification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food is the most valuable source of components exhibiting antioxidant properties. These ingredients belong to different groups, e.g., carotenoids, vitamins, phenolic compounds, peptides, and essential oils, but their common nature includes different modes of antioxidant action. Antioxidants play an important role in homeostatic systems. They are responsible inter alia for maintaining the redox status, act as signaling compounds, or can be healing agents. There are also many in vivo studies of the key role of antioxidant activity in the treatment of many diseases such as cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, cancers, or neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities are usually related to the antioxidant properties.

In modern communities, non- and low-processed foods have become an important branch of the market. This group of products includes unprocessed ready-to-eat fruit and vegetables, sprouted grains, and nuts as well as minimally processed meals, e.g., mixed salads, juices, and smoothies. The composition and pro-health properties of food can be effectively shaped in each step of production; however, in the case of low-processed products, these modifications are limited to the pre- and postharvest treatments of components or final products (e.g., biofortification, elicitation) and establishment of the conditions of storage.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together valuable studies of tailoring the antioxidant activity in low-processed food products. We welcome original research and review articles addressing any pro-health properties of low-processed products and all related topics indicated below.

Dr. Michał Swieca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Low-processed food
  • Food fortification
  • Pro-health properties
  • Food storage
  • Antioxidants
  • Post-harvest treatments
  • Functional food
  • Pre-harvest treatments

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of the Physical State of Spray-Dried Flavonoid-Inulin Microparticles on Oxidative Stability of Lipid Matrices
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110520 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
The effect of the physical state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles (semi-crystalline/amorphous) on the oxidative stability of lipid matrices was studied. Epicatechin (E) and quercetin (Q) microparticles with inulin were formulated at two infeed temperatures (15 °C and 90 °C) by spray drying. X-ray diffraction [...] Read more.
The effect of the physical state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles (semi-crystalline/amorphous) on the oxidative stability of lipid matrices was studied. Epicatechin (E) and quercetin (Q) microparticles with inulin were formulated at two infeed temperatures (15 °C and 90 °C) by spray drying. X-ray diffraction analyses showed that flavonoid-inulin microparticles obtained at feed temperature of 15 °C were semi-crystalline (E-In-15, 61.2% and Q-In-15, 60%), whereas those at 90 °C were amorphous (Q-In-90, 1.73 and Q-In-90 2.30%). Semi-crystalline state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles enhanced the EE (68.8 and 67.8% for E and Q, respectively) compared to amorphous state (41.6 and 51.1% for E and Q, respectively). However, amorphous Q-microparticles showed the highest antioxidant activity both in methyl linoleate and sunflower oil, increasing the induction period and decreasing the polar compounds and polymer triglyceride formation during long-term oxidation study. Therefore, the physical state of spray-dried flavonoid-inulin microparticles may determine their antioxidant activity in lipid matrices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Open AccessArticle
Ozonation of Hot Red Pepper Fruits Increases Their Antioxidant Activity and Changes Some Antioxidant Contents
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090356 - 01 Sep 2019
Abstract
The effect of treatment of pepper fruits with gaseous ozone and storage time following the ozonation process on changes in the content of lipophilic fraction is analyzed for the first time in this paper. The aim of the present study was to assess [...] Read more.
The effect of treatment of pepper fruits with gaseous ozone and storage time following the ozonation process on changes in the content of lipophilic fraction is analyzed for the first time in this paper. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of ozone treatment on the composition of lipophilic compound fraction and its antioxidant activity (AA). Pepper fruits of cv. Cyklon were ozonated for 1 and 3 h immediately after harvesting. Then, the fruits were stored for 30 days under refrigeration conditions. The total content of phenolic compounds and the AA of the lipophilic fraction isolated from the pericarp and placenta of the fruits were investigated after 10, 20, and 30 days of storage. Additionally, quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection analysis of individual phenolic compounds was performed. The results revealed that the content and activity of secondary metabolites varied during storage, with the highest values recorded on the 20th day after harvest, both in control and ozonated fruits, regardless of the ozone dosage used. Treatment of the fruits with ozone for 3 h, but not for 1 h, exhibited a positive effect on the phenolic composition and AA during the prolonged storage of pepper fruits. Three hours of ozonation seems to be the appropriate time to increase the persistence of pepper fruits during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Open AccessArticle
A New Black Elderberry Dye Enriched in Antioxidants Designed for Healthy Sweets Production
Antioxidants 2019, 8(8), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8080257 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
The aim of the study was to obtain a dye from black elder fruits and flowers and to study their potential in production of jellies with high antioxidant activity. Three dyes were produced by lyophilization of aqueous extracts: (1) fruits dye (F), (2) [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to obtain a dye from black elder fruits and flowers and to study their potential in production of jellies with high antioxidant activity. Three dyes were produced by lyophilization of aqueous extracts: (1) fruits dye (F), (2) flowers dye (FL), and (3) fruits and flowers dye (F + FL). Their polyphenol profiles were compared by means of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The antioxidant activity [ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and DPPH radicals scavenging test and total phenolics were compared by spectrophotometric methods. Jellies were produced from agar and gelatin with the addition of three obtained dyes, and their antioxidant water- and lipid soluble fractions were tested with a Photochem device. Results indicated that black elder fruits are rich in anthocyanins, especially cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside (7.56 mg/g d.w.), while flowers are rich in polyphenols, especially chlorogenic acid (2.82 mg/g d.w.) and rutin (4.04 mg/g d.w.). FL dye exhibited higher antioxidant activity compared to F dye (for about 30–40%), regardless of the used method, whereas F + FL dye was characterized by intermediate antioxidant activity. Jellies produced with the addition of FL dye had better antioxidant properties but unattractive color and unpleasant taste, but the use of F + FL dye created a product of favorable organoleptic properties and antioxidant activity comparable to jellies with F dye addition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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