Special Issue "Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Extraction and Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Michał Swieca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Interests: food fortification; pro-health properties; nutritional quality; bioaccessibility; functional foods; antioxidant-rich additives; glucose homeostasis; low-processed food; nutrition
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food is the most valuable source of components exhibiting antioxidant properties. These ingredients belong to different groups, e.g., carotenoids, vitamins, phenolic compounds, peptides, and essential oils, but their common nature includes different modes of antioxidant action. Antioxidants play an important role in homeostatic systems. They are responsible inter alia for maintaining the redox status, act as signaling compounds, or can be healing agents. There are also many in vivo studies of the key role of antioxidant activity in the treatment of many diseases such as cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, cancers, or neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities are usually related to the antioxidant properties.

In modern communities, non- and low-processed foods have become an important branch of the market. This group of products includes unprocessed ready-to-eat fruit and vegetables, sprouted grains, and nuts as well as minimally processed meals, e.g., mixed salads, juices, and smoothies. The composition and pro-health properties of food can be effectively shaped in each step of production; however, in the case of low-processed products, these modifications are limited to the pre- and postharvest treatments of components or final products (e.g., biofortification, elicitation) and establishment of the conditions of storage.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together valuable studies of tailoring the antioxidant activity in low-processed food products. We welcome original research and review articles addressing any pro-health properties of low-processed products and all related topics indicated below.

Dr. Michał Swieca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Low-processed food
  • Food fortification
  • Pro-health properties
  • Food storage
  • Antioxidants
  • Post-harvest treatments
  • Functional food
  • Pre-harvest treatments

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food
Antioxidants 2020, 9(10), 975; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9100975 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 473
Abstract
Food is the most valuable source of components exhibiting antioxidant properties [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)

Research

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Article
Natural-Based Antioxidant Extracts as Potential Mitigators of Fruit Browning
Antioxidants 2020, 9(8), 715; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080715 - 07 Aug 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
Fruit enzymatic browning (EB) inhibition continues to be a challenge in the Food Industry. This physiological disorder results mainly from the oxidation of natural phenolic compounds by polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POX) leading to the formation of brown pigments. EB can be controlled [...] Read more.
Fruit enzymatic browning (EB) inhibition continues to be a challenge in the Food Industry. This physiological disorder results mainly from the oxidation of natural phenolic compounds by polyphenoloxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POX) leading to the formation of brown pigments. EB can be controlled with the application of antioxidants, reducing/inhibiting the activity of these oxidative enzymes. In this study, strawberry tree (leaves and branches) and apple byproduct were the natural-based extracts (NES) selected, as potential tissue browning inhibitors, within a first screening of fifteen natural-based extracts with antioxidant properties. Phenolic profile, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of the selected extracts were also performed as well as their depletion effect on the oxidative enzyme’s activity and browning inhibiton in fresh-cut pears. Strawberry tree extracts (leaves and branches) revealed higher total phenolic content (207.97 ± 0.01 mg GAE.gNES−1 and 104.07 ± 16.38 mg GAE.gNES−1, respectively), confirmed by the plethora of phenolic compounds identified by LC-ESI-UHR-QqTOF-HRMS and quantified by HPLC. This phytochemical composition was reflected in the low IC50 against PPO and POX obtained. Despite the lower phenolic content (6.76 ± 0.11 mg GAE.gNES−1) and antioxidant activity (IC50 = 45.59 ± 1.34 mg mL−1), apple byproduct extract showed potential in delaying browning. This study highlights the opportunity of byproducts and agricultural wastes extracts as novel anti-browning agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
Effects of Darkness and Light Spectra on Nutrients and Pigments in Radish, Soybean, Mung Bean and Pumpkin Sprouts
Antioxidants 2020, 9(6), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9060558 - 26 Jun 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
Fresh sprouts are an important source of antioxidant compounds and contain useful phytonutrients in the human diet. Many factors, such as the time of germination and types of light, influence the physiological processes and biosynthetic pathways in sprouts. The effect of red, blue [...] Read more.
Fresh sprouts are an important source of antioxidant compounds and contain useful phytonutrients in the human diet. Many factors, such as the time of germination and types of light, influence the physiological processes and biosynthetic pathways in sprouts. The effect of red, blue and white light vs. dark conditions on the quality parameters in different sprout species after 5 d of germination was evaluated. Total ascorbate, soluble proteins, sugars, phenolic compounds, and pigments, such as carotenoids, chlorophylls, and anthocyanins, were investigated in radishes, soybeans, mung beans, and pumpkin sprouts. The light treatments increased the contents of vitamin C and the various pigments in all sprouts, conversely, they increased the soluble proteins and sugars, including d-glucose, d-fructose and sucrose, in soybeans and pumpkins, respectively. The dark treatment prevented the decrease in dry matter due to the lighting, while the red light induced an increase in polyphenols in soybean. These results suggest that the nutritional content of different sprouts grown under different light conditions depend on the dark or specific spectral wavelength used for their growth. The manuscript may increase the knowledge on light use for the industrialized food production aiming at preserving the phytonutrient content of vegetables, increasing the consumer health, or developing tailored diets for specific nutritional needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
Soluble Phenolic Composition Tailored by Germination Conditions Accompany Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Wheat
Antioxidants 2020, 9(5), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9050426 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 991
Abstract
Knowledge on the specific variation in the phenolic composition of wheat defined by germination conditions and its relationship with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sprouts would be useful to improve the functional value of wheat-derived products. Variation in soluble phenolic composition, antioxidant and [...] Read more.
Knowledge on the specific variation in the phenolic composition of wheat defined by germination conditions and its relationship with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sprouts would be useful to improve the functional value of wheat-derived products. Variation in soluble phenolic composition, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of wheat was examined in a range of germination temperature (12–21 °C) and time (1–7 d). Response surface methodology was applied for building lineal and quadratic models to find optimal germination conditions to improve nutraceutical value of wheat sprouts using the desirability (D) function. Phenolics were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. In vitro biochemical methods and lipopolysaccharide stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were used to determine antiradical and anti-inflammatory activities of wheat sprouts. Accumulation of soluble phenolic acids, flavone C-glycosides and lignans in sprouts was positively influenced by germination temperature and time. Increased concentration of individual polyphenols was directly associated with improved ability of sprouts for radical scavenging and reduction of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 in macrophages. Optimal desirability (D = 0.89) for improved nutraceutical value of wheat sprouts was achieved at 21 °C for 7 d. This information would be useful for food industry aiming at producing wheat-based products with better nutritional and healthy properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
Effect of Basil Leaves and Wheat Bran Water Extracts on Antioxidant Capacity, Sensory Properties and Microbiological Quality of Shredded Iceberg Lettuce during Storage
Antioxidants 2020, 9(4), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9040355 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 848
Abstract
The effect of basil leaf (BLE) and wheat bran (WBE) extracts (potent anti-browning agents), on the phenolic content, antioxidant potential, microbiological quality, and consumer quality of shredded lettuce during storage were studied. Treatment of lettuce with increasing concentrations of BLE proportionally increased the [...] Read more.
The effect of basil leaf (BLE) and wheat bran (WBE) extracts (potent anti-browning agents), on the phenolic content, antioxidant potential, microbiological quality, and consumer quality of shredded lettuce during storage were studied. Treatment of lettuce with increasing concentrations of BLE proportionally increased the total phenolic content and antioxidant properties. Compared to the control, the treatment enhanced the antiradical properties. This was especially visible during the analysis of the chemical extracts, while this effect was not retained in the potentially bioaccessible fraction. In the lettuce stored for 8 days, the highest reducing potential and ability to quench radicals were observed in samples treated with 1% BLE—33 mg Trolox equivalent/g d.m. and 2.8 mg Trolox equivalent/g d.m., respectively. Compounds exhibiting antiradical properties were easily bioaccessible in vitro. There was no negative effect of the treatments on the consumer quality. Most importantly, after 8 days of storage, lettuce treated with the studied extract, except 10% WBE, had higher microbiological quality. After 8-day storage, the coliforms count was reduced by 84% and 88% in samples treated with 0.5% BLE and 10% WBE, respectively. In conclusion, treatments of shredded lettuce with BLE and WBE maintain or even improve its quality during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
Influence of the Physical State of Spray-Dried Flavonoid-Inulin Microparticles on Oxidative Stability of Lipid Matrices
Antioxidants 2019, 8(11), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8110520 - 30 Oct 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 817
Abstract
The effect of the physical state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles (semi-crystalline/amorphous) on the oxidative stability of lipid matrices was studied. Epicatechin (E) and quercetin (Q) microparticles with inulin were formulated at two infeed temperatures (15 °C and 90 °C) by spray drying. X-ray diffraction [...] Read more.
The effect of the physical state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles (semi-crystalline/amorphous) on the oxidative stability of lipid matrices was studied. Epicatechin (E) and quercetin (Q) microparticles with inulin were formulated at two infeed temperatures (15 °C and 90 °C) by spray drying. X-ray diffraction analyses showed that flavonoid-inulin microparticles obtained at feed temperature of 15 °C were semi-crystalline (E-In-15, 61.2% and Q-In-15, 60%), whereas those at 90 °C were amorphous (Q-In-90, 1.73 and Q-In-90 2.30%). Semi-crystalline state of flavonoid-inulin microparticles enhanced the EE (68.8 and 67.8% for E and Q, respectively) compared to amorphous state (41.6 and 51.1% for E and Q, respectively). However, amorphous Q-microparticles showed the highest antioxidant activity both in methyl linoleate and sunflower oil, increasing the induction period and decreasing the polar compounds and polymer triglyceride formation during long-term oxidation study. Therefore, the physical state of spray-dried flavonoid-inulin microparticles may determine their antioxidant activity in lipid matrices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
Ozonation of Hot Red Pepper Fruits Increases Their Antioxidant Activity and Changes Some Antioxidant Contents
Antioxidants 2019, 8(9), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8090356 - 01 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1059
Abstract
The effect of treatment of pepper fruits with gaseous ozone and storage time following the ozonation process on changes in the content of lipophilic fraction is analyzed for the first time in this paper. The aim of the present study was to assess [...] Read more.
The effect of treatment of pepper fruits with gaseous ozone and storage time following the ozonation process on changes in the content of lipophilic fraction is analyzed for the first time in this paper. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of ozone treatment on the composition of lipophilic compound fraction and its antioxidant activity (AA). Pepper fruits of cv. Cyklon were ozonated for 1 and 3 h immediately after harvesting. Then, the fruits were stored for 30 days under refrigeration conditions. The total content of phenolic compounds and the AA of the lipophilic fraction isolated from the pericarp and placenta of the fruits were investigated after 10, 20, and 30 days of storage. Additionally, quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography diode array detection analysis of individual phenolic compounds was performed. The results revealed that the content and activity of secondary metabolites varied during storage, with the highest values recorded on the 20th day after harvest, both in control and ozonated fruits, regardless of the ozone dosage used. Treatment of the fruits with ozone for 3 h, but not for 1 h, exhibited a positive effect on the phenolic composition and AA during the prolonged storage of pepper fruits. Three hours of ozonation seems to be the appropriate time to increase the persistence of pepper fruits during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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Article
A New Black Elderberry Dye Enriched in Antioxidants Designed for Healthy Sweets Production
Antioxidants 2019, 8(8), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8080257 - 31 Jul 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
The aim of the study was to obtain a dye from black elder fruits and flowers and to study their potential in production of jellies with high antioxidant activity. Three dyes were produced by lyophilization of aqueous extracts: (1) fruits dye (F), (2) [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to obtain a dye from black elder fruits and flowers and to study their potential in production of jellies with high antioxidant activity. Three dyes were produced by lyophilization of aqueous extracts: (1) fruits dye (F), (2) flowers dye (FL), and (3) fruits and flowers dye (F + FL). Their polyphenol profiles were compared by means of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The antioxidant activity [ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and DPPH radicals scavenging test and total phenolics were compared by spectrophotometric methods. Jellies were produced from agar and gelatin with the addition of three obtained dyes, and their antioxidant water- and lipid soluble fractions were tested with a Photochem device. Results indicated that black elder fruits are rich in anthocyanins, especially cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside (7.56 mg/g d.w.), while flowers are rich in polyphenols, especially chlorogenic acid (2.82 mg/g d.w.) and rutin (4.04 mg/g d.w.). FL dye exhibited higher antioxidant activity compared to F dye (for about 30–40%), regardless of the used method, whereas F + FL dye was characterized by intermediate antioxidant activity. Jellies produced with the addition of FL dye had better antioxidant properties but unattractive color and unpleasant taste, but the use of F + FL dye created a product of favorable organoleptic properties and antioxidant activity comparable to jellies with F dye addition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designing the Antioxidant Properties of Low-Processed Food)
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