Metabolic Profiling for Microbial Resistance

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 11831

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: microbiology; molecular biology; drug discovery

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Guest Editor
Environmental Metabolomics and Proteomics, Land & Water, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Ecoscience Precinct, Dutton Park, QLD 4160, Australia
Interests: metabolomics; environmental multi-omics; pesticide analysis; systems biology; environmental science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Infectious diseases continue to be a major public health issue. The emergence of new diseases, the re-emergence of old diseases and the increased rates of resistance to antimicrobial agents, such as antibiotics, have led to a great demand for new drugs with novel modes of actions. The World Health Organisation has declared that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) “is an increasingly serious threat to global public health that requires action across all government sectors and society”. Current estimates indicate that without effective measures 10 million people will die from AMR by 2050 – greater than the total number of cancer deaths today. Thus, new strategies are needed to combat AMR. Increased understanding of how AMR develops, new methods to rapidly identify resistant microbes and the development of new drugs with novel modes of actions are urgently required if we are to make an impact. Metabolomics presents an opportunity to apply new technologies to better understand the problems associated with AMR and to develop new and more effective solutions. This special issue will bring together current information relevant to AMR and illustrate how innovative metabolomics approaches can help us to address a major health problem. We invite you to be part of this exciting project.

Prof. Enzo Palombo
Dr. David J. Beale
Dr. Konstantinos A. Kouremenos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metabolic profiling
  • metabolomics
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • drug discovery
  • antimicrobial therapies.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2100 KiB  
Article
Towards the Identification of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infections Using Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis—A Pilot Study
by Keith Hewett, Natalia Drabińska, Paul White, Matthew B. Avison, Raj Persad, Norman Ratcliffe and Ben de Lacy Costello
Antibiotics 2020, 9(11), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9110797 - 11 Nov 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2176
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is an unprecedented threat to modern medicine. The analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from bacteria potentially offers a rapid way to determine antibiotic susceptibility in bacteria. This study aimed to find the optimal conditions to obtain the maximum number of [...] Read more.
Antibiotic resistance is an unprecedented threat to modern medicine. The analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from bacteria potentially offers a rapid way to determine antibiotic susceptibility in bacteria. This study aimed to find the optimal conditions to obtain the maximum number of VOCs detected which next allowed the assessment of differences in VOC profiles between susceptible and resistant isolates of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections. The analysis of VOCs in the headspace above the bacterial cultures allowed the distinguishing of resistant and susceptible bacteria based on the abundance of six VOCs with 85.7% overall accuracy. The results of this preliminary study are promising, and with development could lead to a practical, faster diagnostic method for use in routine microbiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Profiling for Microbial Resistance)
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Review

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16 pages, 2640 KiB  
Review
Recent Development of Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Methods through Metabolic Profiling of Bacteria
by Chen Chen and Weili Hong
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10030311 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3696
Abstract
Due to the inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics, the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing and have become a major threat to human health. A key factor in the treatment of bacterial infections and slowing down the emergence of antibiotic [...] Read more.
Due to the inappropriate use and overuse of antibiotics, the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing and have become a major threat to human health. A key factor in the treatment of bacterial infections and slowing down the emergence of antibiotic resistance is to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of infecting bacteria rapidly to prescribe appropriate drugs and reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Current phenotypic AST methods based on the detection of bacterial growth are generally reliable but are too slow. There is an urgent need for new methods that can perform AST rapidly. Bacterial metabolism is a fast process, as bacterial cells double about every 20 to 30 min for fast-growing species. Moreover, bacterial metabolism has shown to be related to drug resistance, so a comparison of differences in microbial metabolic processes in the presence or absence of antimicrobials provides an alternative approach to traditional culture for faster AST. In this review, we summarize recent developments in rapid AST methods through metabolic profiling of bacteria under antibiotic treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Profiling for Microbial Resistance)
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16 pages, 1083 KiB  
Review
Nanomotion Detection-Based Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing
by Sandor Kasas, Anton Malovichko, Maria Ines Villalba, María Elena Vela, Osvaldo Yantorno and Ronnie G. Willaert
Antibiotics 2021, 10(3), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10030287 - 10 Mar 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5141
Abstract
Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) could play a major role in fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. Recently, it was discovered that all living organisms oscillate in the range of nanometers and that these oscillations, referred to as nanomotion, stop as soon the organism dies. This [...] Read more.
Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) could play a major role in fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. Recently, it was discovered that all living organisms oscillate in the range of nanometers and that these oscillations, referred to as nanomotion, stop as soon the organism dies. This finding led to the development of rapid AST techniques based on the monitoring of these oscillations upon exposure to antibiotics. In this review, we explain the working principle of this novel technique, compare the method with current ASTs, explore its application and give some advice about its implementation. As an illustrative example, we present the application of the technique to the slowly growing and pathogenic Bordetella pertussis bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Profiling for Microbial Resistance)
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