Special Issue "10th Anniversary of Antibiotics–Recent Advances in Antimicrobial Peptides"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antimicrobial Peptides".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zhijian Cao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. State Key Laboratory of Virology, Modern Virology Research Center, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
2. Hubei Province Engineering and Technology Research, Center for Fluorinated Pharmaceuticals, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
Interests: antimicrobial peptides; virus infection and prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The efficacy of antibiotics has been challenged in recent decades through the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and associated threat for humans and the other living organisms. Antibacterial peptides are part of the arsenal of host defense peptides that are present in a variety of more or less complex prokaryotic and eucaryotic life forms. Because of their particular antibacterial potential, they are currently emerging as candidate therapeutic drugs against both pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including those resistant to conventional antibiotics. This Special Issue commemorating the 10th anniversary of the journal Antibiotics deals with all aspects of antibacterial peptides (from natural or non-natural sources), from their discovery to their evolution, structural/functional characterization, as well as their evaluation in clinical trials. Potential contributors from all countries are strongly encouraged to submit their works in this important field of scientific research.

The topic of this Special Issue is devoted to antimicrobial peptides (AMP). Some AMPs might be the next generation of antibiotics.

Dr. Jean-Marc Sabatier
Prof. Dr. Zhijian Cao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial peptides
  • Antibacterial
  • Antibiotics
  • Structure–activity relationships
  • Bacteriocins
  • Drug design
  • Peptide engineering
  • Bacterial resistance

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Design, Synthesis and Antifungal Activity of Stapled Aurein1.2 Peptides
Antibiotics 2021, 10(8), 956; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10080956 - 09 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Aurein1.2 is a 13-residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria aurea. In order to improve its stabilities, the helical contents and corresponding biological activities of Aurein1.2 (a series of stapled analogues) were synthesized, and their potential antifungal activities were [...] Read more.
Aurein1.2 is a 13-residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria aurea. In order to improve its stabilities, the helical contents and corresponding biological activities of Aurein1.2 (a series of stapled analogues) were synthesized, and their potential antifungal activities were evaluated. Not surprisingly, the stapled Aurein1.2 peptides showed higher proteolytic stability and helicity than the linear counterpart. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ten stapled peptides against six strains of common pathogenic fungi was determined by the microscale broth dilution method recommended by CLSI. Of them, Sau-1, Sau-2, Sau-5, and Sau-9 exhibited better inhibitory effects on the fungi than the linear peptide. These stapled Aurein1.2 peptides may serve as the leading compounds for further optimization and antifungal therapy. Full article
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Article
Molecular Cloning and Functional Identification of the Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Ctri9594 from the Venom of the Scorpion Chaerilus tricostatus
Antibiotics 2021, 10(8), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10080896 - 23 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Scorpion venom is a mixture of bioactive peptides, among which neurotoxins and antimicrobial peptides serve especially vital functions. Scorpion venom peptides in Buthidae species have been well described, but toxic peptides from non-Buthidae species have been under-investigated. Here, an antimicrobial peptide gene, Ctri9594, [...] Read more.
Scorpion venom is a mixture of bioactive peptides, among which neurotoxins and antimicrobial peptides serve especially vital functions. Scorpion venom peptides in Buthidae species have been well described, but toxic peptides from non-Buthidae species have been under-investigated. Here, an antimicrobial peptide gene, Ctri9594, was cloned and functionally identified from the venom of the scorpion Chaerilus tricostatus. The precursor nucleotide sequence of Ctri9594 is 199 nt in length, including a 43 nt 5′ UTR, 115 nt 3′ UTR and 210 nt ORF. The ORF encodes 69 amino acid residues, containing a 21 aa signal peptide, 14 aa mature peptide, 3 aa C-terminal posttranslational processing signal and 31 aa propeptide. Multiple sequence alignment and evolutionary analyses show that Ctri9594 is an antimicrobial peptide in scorpion venom. The mature peptide of Ctri9594 was chemically synthesized with a purity greater than 95% and a molecular mass of 1484.4 Da. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) indicate that the synthesized mature peptide of Ctri9594 has inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus thuringensis, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus) but not Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or a fungus (Candida albicans). The antimicrobial mechanism of Ctri9594 is inferred to be related to its amphiphilic α-helix structure. Full article
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Article
Super-Cationic Peptide Dendrimers—Synthesis and Evaluation as Antimicrobial Agents
Antibiotics 2021, 10(6), 695; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10060695 - 10 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Microbial infections are a major public health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been demonstrated to be a plausible alternative to the current arsenal of drugs that has become inefficient due to multidrug resistance. Herein we describe a new AMP family, namely the super-cationic [...] Read more.
Microbial infections are a major public health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been demonstrated to be a plausible alternative to the current arsenal of drugs that has become inefficient due to multidrug resistance. Herein we describe a new AMP family, namely the super-cationic peptide dendrimers (SCPDs). Although all members of the series exert some antibacterial activity, we propose that special attention should be given to (KLK)2KLLKLL-NH2 (G1KLK-L2KL2), which shows selectivity for Gram-negative bacteria and virtually no cytotoxicity in HepG2 and HEK293. These results reinforce the validity of the SCPD family as a valuable class of AMP and support G1KLK-L2KL2 as a strong lead candidate for the future development of an antibacterial agent against Gram-negative bacteria. Full article
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Review

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Review
Antimicrobial Peptides: A Potent Alternative to Antibiotics
Antibiotics 2021, 10(9), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10091095 - 10 Sep 2021
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Abstract
Antimicrobial peptides constitute one of the most promising alternatives to antibiotics since they could be used to treat bacterial infections, especially those caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Many antimicrobial peptides, with various activity spectra and mechanisms of actions, have been described. This review focuses [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial peptides constitute one of the most promising alternatives to antibiotics since they could be used to treat bacterial infections, especially those caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Many antimicrobial peptides, with various activity spectra and mechanisms of actions, have been described. This review focuses on their use against ESKAPE bacteria, especially in biofilm treatments, their synergistic activity, and their application as prophylactic agents. Limitations and challenges restricting therapeutic applications are highlighted, and solutions for each challenge are evaluated to analyze whether antimicrobial peptides could replace antibiotics in the near future. Full article
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Review
Beehive Products as Antibacterial Agents: A Review
Antibiotics 2021, 10(6), 717; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10060717 - 15 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Honeybees are one of the most marvelous and economically beneficial insects. As pollinators, they play a vital role in every aspect of the ecosystem. Beehive products have been used for thousands of years in many cultures for the treatment of various diseases. Their [...] Read more.
Honeybees are one of the most marvelous and economically beneficial insects. As pollinators, they play a vital role in every aspect of the ecosystem. Beehive products have been used for thousands of years in many cultures for the treatment of various diseases. Their healing properties have been documented in many religious texts like the Noble Quran and the Holy Bible. Honey, bee venom, propolis, pollen and royal jelly all demonstrated a richness in their bioactive compounds which make them effective against a variety of bacterial strains. Furthermore, many studies showed that honey and bee venom work as powerful antibacterial agents against a wide range of bacteria including life-threatening bacteria. Several reports documented the biological activities of honeybee products but none of them emphasized on the antibacterial activity of all beehive products. Therefore, this review aims to highlight the antibacterial activity of honey, bee venom, propolis, pollen and royal jelly, that are produced by honeybees. Full article
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