Special Issue "Nutritional Quality Assessment in Milk and Dairy Products"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Cattle".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 2453

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aneta Brodziak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Quality Assessment and Processing of Animal Products, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Bioeconomy, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: milk; organic production; dairy products; quality; bioactive compounds; whey proteins; vitamins; peptides; chromatographic analysis; food safety
Prof. Dr. Joanna Barłowska
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Quality Assessment and Processing of Animal Products, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Bioeconomy, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: milk; local breeds; animal welfare; milk production; nutritional value of milk; technological parameters; cheese; regional food; traditional food

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,


Recent years have seen growing awareness among consumers, accompanied by changes in their dietary preferences. Due to the growing incidence of diseases of civilization, interest in functional food is increasing, as is demand for low-processed food products. The latter are generally produced locally on a small scale (often using raw materials obtained from local animal breeds), using traditional processing methods. These products are distinguished by higher nutritional value and better sensory attributes than mass-produced food products. An increasing amount of food produced at small processing facilities, where the primary goal is high nutritional quality and health benefits, is appearing on the market.


Milk and dairy products are among the most important components of the human diet. No other food product is equal to milk in terms of nutritional value, and its composition is considered a physiological standard to which the nutrients supplied by other products and dishes are compared. Dairy products are a source of proteins of high biological quality, lipids, and carbohydrates (mainly lactose). Moreover, milk is a valuable source of bioactive substances with a beneficial effect on the human body, such as specific proteins, peptides, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids, fat- and water-soluble vitamins, macro- and microelements, enzymes, and hormones. However, despite its many valuable nutrients and biologically active substances, milk also contains substances that can cause food intolerance—immunological (i.e., allergies), or non-immunological, causing gastrointestinal disorders.


The quality of milk is determined by numerous factors, which may be genetic (breed, species, and individual traits), physiological (health condition, including of the mammary gland, age, and stage of lactation), and environmental (diet, production season, housing conditions, and welfare). It should be remembered, however, that the quality of milk has a direct and crucial effect on the quality of dairy products, mainly cheese. In recent years, the advantages of traditional (including organic) feeding of dairy animals using pasture forage have been rediscovered. Pasture forage has a beneficial effect on the technological parameters and nutritional value of milk and on its content of functional components believed to have a beneficial effect on human health. In intensive systems, various feed additives in the diet of dairy animals have been shown to increase the nutritional value of milk. Another question that has taken on particular importance is animal welfare. With the intensification of milk production, animal welfare declines, and stress responses to various factors appear. Stressful conditions are known to adversely affect lactation and thus milk yield and quality, while also leading to reproductive disorders. This necessitates multifaceted monitoring of the quality of raw milk, which is crucial to the quality of finished dairy products.


Accurate verification of the quality of raw milk and dairy products requires a wide spectrum of analytical methods, including instrumental methods which are increasingly advanced and precise.


We are convinced that the proposed research problem concerning various factors determining the quality of milk and dairy products, as well as methods of assessing them, will expand the current state of knowledge in this field.
This is evidenced by all the publications selected for this Special Issue.

Dr. Aneta Brodziak

Prof. Joanna Barłowska

Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk
  • various species of animals
  • local breeds
  • animal welfare
  • production system
  • dairy products
  • regional products
  • quality
  • nutritional value
  • technological suitability
  • bioactive compounds
  • methods of analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Chemical Composition, Fatty Acid Profile, and Lipid Quality Indices in Commercial Ripening of Cow Cheeses from Different Seasons
Animals 2022, 12(2), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12020198 - 14 Jan 2022
Viewed by 462
Abstract
The aim of the study was to compare and demonstrate whether commercial rennet ripening cheeses available on the market in summer and winter differ in their chemical composition, fatty acid profile, content of cis9trans11 C18:2 (CLA) acid and other trans [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to compare and demonstrate whether commercial rennet ripening cheeses available on the market in summer and winter differ in their chemical composition, fatty acid profile, content of cis9trans11 C18:2 (CLA) acid and other trans isomers of C18:1 and C18:2 acid and whether they are characterized by different values of lipid quality assessment indices. The experimental material consisted of rennet ripening of cheeses produced from cow’s milk available in the Polish market. The first batch contained cheeses produced in winter and purchased from the market between May and June. The second batch contained cheeses produced in summer and purchased between November and December. Chemical composition was analyzed by FoodScan apparatus. The gas chromatography (GC) method was used to determine the content of fatty acids. Results obtained in the presented study indicate that the chemical composition, content of fatty acids trans isomers, and lipid quality indices varied between summer and winter cheeses. The summer cheeses were richer sources of MUFA and PUFA compared to winter cheeses. Summer cheeses were also characterized by lower content of SFA, higher content n − 3, lower n − 6/n − 3 ratio, and higher content of DFA. Higher contents of CLA and trans C18:1 and C18:2 were found in summer cheeses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Quality Assessment in Milk and Dairy Products)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Use of Olkuska Sheep Milk for the Production of Symbiotic Dairy Ice Cream
Animals 2022, 12(1), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12010070 - 29 Dec 2021
Viewed by 449
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using Olkuska sheep milk for the production of ice cream with probiotics and prebiotics. The study examined the effect of the storage and type of bacteria used for the fermentation of ice [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using Olkuska sheep milk for the production of ice cream with probiotics and prebiotics. The study examined the effect of the storage and type of bacteria used for the fermentation of ice cream mixes and partial replacement of inulin with apple fiber on the physicochemical properties, viability of probiotic cultures and organoleptic properties of sheep’s milk ice cream stored at −22 °C for 21 days. The addition of apple fiber reduced the pH value of ice cream mixes before fermentation. In ice cream mixes and ice cream with apple fiber, the lactic acid content was higher by 0.1–0.2 g L−1 than in their equivalents with inulin only. These differences persisted during the storage of the ice cream. After fermentation of the ice mixes, the bacterial cell count ranged from 10.62 log cfu g−1 to 12.25 log cfu g−1. The freezing process reduced the population of probiotic bacteria cells in ice cream with inulin from 0.8 log cfu g−1 in ice cream with Lactobacillus acidophilus, 1.0 log cfu g−1 in ice cream with Lacticaseibacillus paracasei and 1.1 log cfu g−1 in ice cream with Lacticaseibacilluscasei. Freezing the varieties with apple fiber also resulted in a reduction of viable bacterial cells from 0.8 log cfu g−1 in ice cream with L. paracasei and Lb. acidophilus to 1 log cfu g−1 in ice cream with L. casei, compared to the results after fermentation. The highest percentage overrun was determined in ice cream with L. paracasei and Lb. acidophilus. Ice cream with L. casei was characterized by significantly lower overrun on the 7th and 21st days of storage. Although L. paracasei ice cream had the highest overrun, it did not cause a significant reduction in the probiotic population during storage. After seven days of storage, the first drop differed significantly depending on the type of bacteria used for fermentation of the mixture and the addition of apple fiber. L. casei ice cream had a longer first drop time than L. paracasei and Lb. acidophilus ice cream. Partial replacement of inulin with apple fiber resulted in a significant darkening of the color of ice cream mixes. Depending on the type of bacteria used for fermentation, the addition of apple fiber decreased the value of the L* parameter. Ice cream mixes and ice cream with inulin and apple fiber were characterized by a high proportion of yellow. Partial replacement of inulin with apple fiber reduced the hardness of ice cream compared to inulin-only ice cream. Moreover, the panelists found that ice cream with inulin was characterized by a sweeter taste than ice cream with apple fiber. Moreover, the addition of apple fiber favorably increased the flavor and aroma perception of the mango-passion fruit. Therefore, the milk of Olkuska sheep could be successfully used for the production of symbiotic dairy ice cream. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Quality Assessment in Milk and Dairy Products)
Article
Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus sp. Isolated from Cheeses
Animals 2022, 12(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12010036 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 829
Abstract
S. aureus and some species of coagulase-negative staphylococci, including S. chromogenes and S. simulans, commonly cause intramammary infections. However, little attention was paid to the antimicrobial resistance of these species with respect to their occurrence in dairy products, for example, popular sheep [...] Read more.
S. aureus and some species of coagulase-negative staphylococci, including S. chromogenes and S. simulans, commonly cause intramammary infections. However, little attention was paid to the antimicrobial resistance of these species with respect to their occurrence in dairy products, for example, popular sheep and goat cheeses made from unpasteurized milk. The aim of this study was to investigate such sheep and goat cheeses for the occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of the relevant staphylococci species. The staphylococcal isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction (130 isolates) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The most common species of S. aureus (56 isolates) were identified, as well as S. chromogenes (16 isolates) and S. simulans (10 isolates). Antimicrobial resistance to penicillin, oxacilin, ceftaroline, teicoplanin, gentamicin, erythromycin, tetracycline and ofloxacin was subsequently determined in these species using the agar dilution method. The highest resistance was confirmed in all species, especially to penicillin (91%) and erythromycin (67%). The highest sensitivity was confirmed to ofloxacin (83%). Due to the high incidence of penicillin and oxacilin-resistant staphylococci, the mecA gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction, which was confirmed only in S. aureus isolates (19%). Our study shows that the tested strains (77%) were resistant to more than one antibiotic at a time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Quality Assessment in Milk and Dairy Products)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Bioactive status of milk obtained from native breed of cows in organic and conventional dairy herds
Authors: Monika Sobczuk-Szul
Affiliation: Uniwersytet Warminsko-Mazurski w Olsztyniedisabled, Olsztyn WM, Poland
Abstract: Organic dairy farmers are looking for animals which will be suitable for organic systems. This system is highly dependent on the environment and require animals well adapted to local conditions. Despite of the productive performance of local breeds, their milk has higher nutritional value than milk produced in intensive systems. On the other side, cows used in organic farms are often the same as in conventional systems and most often there are Holstein-friesian breed. In last years there is increasing numbers of consumers who are looking for food with greater nutritional value, a lack of additives, and health benefits. The objective of our study was to compare the content of selected bioactive proteins, mineral composition and vitamins, which largely determine the bioactive status of milk, in milk obtained from Polish Holstein-friesian and Polish black and white cows in organic and conventional dairy herds.

Title: Effect of Lactoferrin Addition on the Properties of Yoghurt
Authors: Anna Jańczuk; Aneta Brodziak; Jolanta Król; Tomasz Czernecki; Mariusz Florek; Łukasz Wlazło
Affiliation: University of Life Sciences in Lublin

Back to TopTop