Topical Collection "Veterinary Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine"

A topical collection in Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This collection belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Editors

Prof. Dr. David Levine
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Physical Therapy, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN 37403, USA
Interests: canine rehabilitation and physical therapy; orthopedic rehabilitation; neurological rehabilitation; manual therapy; infection control; gait analysis
Dr. Anna Bergh
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Agricultural Sciences, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: veterinary rehabilitation; sport medicine; outcome measures of physical dysfunction; pain assessment and treatment; functional anatomy
Dr. Yves Samoy
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Medical Imaging and Small Animal Orthopedics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: small animal arthroscopy and orthopaedics; small animal physiotherapy; sports medicine; rehabilitation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Darryl Millis
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
Interests: gait analysis; physical rehabilitation; sports medicine; osteoarthritis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Heli Katariina Hyytiäinen
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 57 (Viikintie 49), 00014 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: animal physiotherapy; sport medicine; outcome measures of physical dysfunction; pain assessment and treatment; functional anatomy
Dr. Elin Hernlund
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE 75007 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: horses; musculoskeletal; lameness in horses; orthopedic pain

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sports medicine and rehabilitation comprise a well-established discipline in human medicine, and the  benefits have been clearly documented and established in the medical literature. Awareness of this field in veterinary medicine has been rapidly growing, and the techniques used in human sports medicine and rehabilitation have been adapted for veterinary use. The growing interest in this field among veterinarians has led to the formation of new specialty colleges, such as the American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation and the European College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation.

There is a clear need, and a significant interest on the part of the veterinary profession, to better understand the role of sports medicine and rehabilitation following injury, surgery, and illness, and to improve patient outcomes by incorporating this specialty. Objective outcome measures of physical dysfunction and pain are of great importance, in order to select the optimal treatments and to assess treatment effectiveness. Evidence-based veterinary rehabilitation and sports medicine require knowledge of these outcome measures, as well as the mechanisms of action and efficacy for different treatment protocols in specific diagnoses. The aim of this Collection is to publish original research papers or reviews concerning veterinary rehabilitation and sports medicine for both equine and small animal practice. We hope this information can provide a better understanding of the evidence related to assessment methods, treatment techniques, and interventions utilized.

We invite you to share your recent findings through this Topical Collection.

Prof. Dr. David Levine
Dr. Anna Bergh
Dr. Yves Samoy
Prof. Dr. Darryl Millis
Dr. Heli Katariina Hyytiäinen
Dr. Elin Hernlund
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • veterinary medicine
  • rehabilitation
  • physiotherapy
  • outcome measures
  • physical dysfunction
  • pain
  • assessment
  • sports medicine

Published Papers (4 papers)

2021

Review
A Systematic Review of Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine: “Miscellaneous Therapies”
Animals 2021, 11(12), 3356; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11123356 - 24 Nov 2021
Viewed by 819
Abstract
There is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM). There is, however, an uncertainty of the efficacy of these methods. Therefore, the aim of this systematic literature review is to assess the evidence for clinical efficacy of 24 CAVM therapies [...] Read more.
There is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM). There is, however, an uncertainty of the efficacy of these methods. Therefore, the aim of this systematic literature review is to assess the evidence for clinical efficacy of 24 CAVM therapies used in cats, dogs, and horses. A bibliographic search, restricted to studies in cats, dogs, and horses, was performed on Web of Science Core Collection, CABI, and PubMed. Relevant articles were assessed for scientific quality, and information was extracted on study characteristics, species, type of treatment, indication, and treatment effects. Of 982 unique publications screened, 42 were eligible for inclusion, representing nine different CAVM therapies, which were aromatherapy, gold therapy, homeopathy, leeches (hirudotherapy), mesotherapy, mud, neural therapy, sound (music) therapy, and vibration therapy. For 15 predefined therapies, no study was identified. The risk of bias was assessed as high in 17 studies, moderate to high in 10, moderate in 10, low to moderate in four, and low in one study. In those studies where the risk of bias was low to moderate, there was considerable heterogeneity in reported treatment effects. Therefore, the scientific evidence is not strong enough to define the clinical efficacy of the 24 CAVM therapies. Full article
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Article
A Questionnaire Study on the Use of Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine for Horses in Sweden
Animals 2021, 11(11), 3113; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11113113 - 30 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 470
Abstract
Complementary or alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) includes treatment methods with limited scientific evidence. Swedish veterinarians are legally obliged to base treatments and recommendations on science or well-documented experience, but most CAVM methods are not well documented in animals. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Complementary or alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) includes treatment methods with limited scientific evidence. Swedish veterinarians are legally obliged to base treatments and recommendations on science or well-documented experience, but most CAVM methods are not well documented in animals. The aim of this study was to explore the use of CAVM in Swedish horses. Electronic questionnaires were distributed to horse owners, equine veterinary practitioners and CAVM therapists. Of the 204 responding horse owners, 83% contacted a veterinarian first in case of lameness, while 15% contacted a CAVM therapist. For back pain, 52% stated a CAVM therapist as their first contact and 45% a veterinarian. Only 10–15% of the respondents did not use any CAVM method for prevention or after injury. Of the 100 veterinarians who responded, more than half did not use CAVM themselves but 55% did refer to people who offer this service. Of the 124 responding CAVM therapists, 72% recommended their clients to seek veterinary advice when needed, 50% received referrals from a veterinarian, and 25% did not collaborate with a veterinarian. The two most common methods used by the respondents in all three categories were stretching and massage. Most veterinarians and therapists were not content with the current lack of CAVM regulation. Full article
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Review
A Systematic Review of Musculoskeletal Mobilization and Manipulation Techniques Used in Veterinary Medicine
Animals 2021, 11(10), 2787; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11102787 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1073
Abstract
Mobilization and manipulation techniques are often used in small animal and equine practice; however, questions remain concerning indications, dosing and efficacy. A bibliographic search was performed to identify peer-reviewed publications from 1980 to 2020 that evaluated the clinical effects of musculoskeletal mobilization and [...] Read more.
Mobilization and manipulation techniques are often used in small animal and equine practice; however, questions remain concerning indications, dosing and efficacy. A bibliographic search was performed to identify peer-reviewed publications from 1980 to 2020 that evaluated the clinical effects of musculoskeletal mobilization and manipulation techniques in dogs, cats and horses. The search strategy identified 883 papers for review. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. The clinical indications, dosages, outcome parameters, and reported efficacy within each publication were recorded and categorized for comparison with scientific quality assessed according to a standardized grading system. Fourteen articles were included in this systematic review of which 13 were equine and one was a canine study. Seven of these were cohort studies and seven were randomized controlled clinical trials. The canine study involved carpal immobilization-remobilization and all equine studies focused on the effects of passive mobilization (n = 5) or manipulation (n = 8) of the axial skeleton. Study quality was low (n = 4), moderate (n = 7), and high (n = 3) and included a wide array of outcome parameters with varying levels of efficacy and duration of therapeutic effects, which prevented further meta-analysis. Therefore, it was difficult to draw firm conclusions despite all studies reporting positive effects. Optimal technique indications and dosages need to be determined to improve the standardization of these treatment options. Full article
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Article
Comparison of the Effect of High-Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) on Skin Surface Temperature and Vein Diameter in Pigmented and Non-Pigmented Skin in Healthy Racehorses
Animals 2021, 11(7), 1965; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11071965 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1503
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess differences in the influence of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) on the skin surface temperature and vein diameter of the lateral fetlock joint region in a group of racehorses with pigmented and non-pigmented skin in the [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess differences in the influence of high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) on the skin surface temperature and vein diameter of the lateral fetlock joint region in a group of racehorses with pigmented and non-pigmented skin in the treatment area. Twenty Thoroughbreds were divided into two equal groups: pigmented and non-pigmented skin groups. Each horse received the same HILT treatment. Just before and immediately after HILT, thermographic examination was performed to measure the skin surface temperature and ultrasonographic examination assessed the lateral digital palmar vein diameter. After HILT, the pigmented skin surface temperature increased, while the non-pigmented skin surface temperature decreased, and the difference between both groups was significant (p < 0.001). The vein diameter increased after HILT in horses with pigmented and non-pigmented skin, but the difference between both groups was not significant (p = 0.14). In conclusion, melanin content in the epidermis plays an important role in light energy absorption and photothermal effects. The vein diameter changes after HILT application indicated that the increase in vessel diameter may partly depend on photothermal mechanisms occurring in irradiated tissue. Further research is necessary to describe the physiological and clinical effects of HILT performed on pigmented and non-pigmented skin. Full article
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